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Tissue Transplants

NEWS
May 27, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Health and Human Services Secretary Otis R. Bowen on Tuesday called a controversial moratorium on fetal tissue research--first imposed while he was secretary--a "mistake" and urged speedy approval of legislation that would overturn it. He also opposed as "medically unworkable" a compromise proposal by President Bush to encourage the research as long as it was conducted only with tissue obtained through ectopic pregnancies and miscarriages rather than through elective abortions.
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NEWS
May 19, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The White House is expected to launch a last-minute attempt today to derail expected congressional action on legislation that would overturn a federal ban on fetal-tissue research. The action is likely to come in an order by President Bush to establish a national bank and registry for tissue obtained from ectopic pregnancies and miscarriages.
NEWS
February 10, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
An amputee who received a transplanted hand from a cadaver at a Kentucky hospital said that the joy of seeing his new left hand replaced the horror he had felt since waking from amputation surgery in 1985. "My first impression was, 'Wow, 13 years has just evaporated,' " Matthew Scott said at a news conference at Jewish Hospital in Louisville, Ky., where the 15-hour operation to attach a new hand was completed Jan. 25.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1990 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A revolutionary, one-time treatment to eliminate organ transplant rejection could be tested in kidney recipients within the next year, a Stanford University researcher reported here last week. The process uses proteins called monoclonal antibodies to trick the immune system into recognizing foreign tissue as its own. It would eliminate the need for lifelong therapy with anti-rejection drugs that are themselves harmful to the body. Speaking at an American Heart Assn. science writers' meeting, Dr.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
For the first time, scientists have been able to convert muscle tissue into bones of a precise shape, potentially providing an important new source of bone for grafts and wound repairs. Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis and the National Institutes of Health combined muscle tissue from the legs of rats with finely ground bone powder, added a synthetically produced growth factor and injected the mixture into a rubber mold.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As expected, President Bush on Tuesday vetoed legislation that would have overturned a federal ban on fetal tissue research, saying that such work is "inconsistent with our nation's deeply held beliefs" and that many Americans find it "morally repugnant."
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In three separate studies released today, researchers report the most convincing evidence yet that the controversial technique of implanting tissues from aborted fetuses into the brains of Parkinson's disease patients can produce significant improvements in mobility and quality of life.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first, she thought it was a bad case of jet lag. Then her vision began to blur, and she got lost on the walk to the nearby post office. Her handwriting became childlike, and she was tormented by hallucinogenic nightmares. Within four months of her first headache, Takako Tani quite literally lost her mind to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, or CJD, the human form of the fatal brain-wasting malady known as "mad cow" disease. It was 1996. She was 41.
NEWS
August 8, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move almost certain to reignite the smoldering battle over fetal tissue research, Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles) intends to introduce legislation to overturn the ban on federal funding for such work. Scientists believe that fetal tissue research holds extraordinary promise for the treatment of an array of serious illnesses, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, Huntington's disease, leukemia and spinal cord injuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Two types of experimental surgical procedures have significantly improved the conditions of patients with Parkinson's disease, surgeons said here Wednesday. Two teams of researchers independently reported that in a total of 11 patients, grafts of fetal tissue obtained during abortions sharply reduced tremors and rigidity and increased control of limb functions.
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