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Tissue Transplants

NEWS
June 24, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As expected, President Bush on Tuesday vetoed legislation that would have overturned a federal ban on fetal tissue research, saying that such work is "inconsistent with our nation's deeply held beliefs" and that many Americans find it "morally repugnant."
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NEWS
November 26, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In three separate studies released today, researchers report the most convincing evidence yet that the controversial technique of implanting tissues from aborted fetuses into the brains of Parkinson's disease patients can produce significant improvements in mobility and quality of life.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first, she thought it was a bad case of jet lag. Then her vision began to blur, and she got lost on the walk to the nearby post office. Her handwriting became childlike, and she was tormented by hallucinogenic nightmares. Within four months of her first headache, Takako Tani quite literally lost her mind to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, or CJD, the human form of the fatal brain-wasting malady known as "mad cow" disease. It was 1996. She was 41.
NEWS
August 8, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move almost certain to reignite the smoldering battle over fetal tissue research, Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles) intends to introduce legislation to overturn the ban on federal funding for such work. Scientists believe that fetal tissue research holds extraordinary promise for the treatment of an array of serious illnesses, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, Huntington's disease, leukemia and spinal cord injuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Two types of experimental surgical procedures have significantly improved the conditions of patients with Parkinson's disease, surgeons said here Wednesday. Two teams of researchers independently reported that in a total of 11 patients, grafts of fetal tissue obtained during abortions sharply reduced tremors and rigidity and increased control of limb functions.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With abortion rights advocates riding a wave of favorable public opinion in California, anti-abortion lobbyists and lawmakers are quietly devising a legislative strategy they hope will turn the tables and put the pro-choice side on the spot. The opponents of abortion realize that a majority of Californians, asked in the abstract, favor a woman's right to choose abortion.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court, hearing a pivotal case from the emerging field of biotechnology, was asked Tuesday to grant medical patients a broad new right to share in profits from the commercial use of their bodily tissues. The lawyer for a leukemia survivor whose cancerous spleen was removed and used in research urged the justices to open the way for a landmark lawsuit that pits a patient's claim over surgically removed organs against the asserted interests of scientific research.
NEWS
January 23, 1993 | KAREN TUMULTY and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With a stroke of a pen, President Clinton marked the 20th anniversary of Roe vs. Wade on Friday by dismantling a series of Ronald Reagan and George Bush Administration abortion restrictions, only hours after tens of thousands of anti-abortion demonstrators rallied across the street from the White House.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Bob Orth had been a telephone lineman in Santa Rosa for more than 20 years when he started developing symptoms of Parkinson's disease. By the time he had been on the job 30 years, he felt forced to retire "because I wasn't doing the job properly anymore." In retirement, the situation worsened. Parkinson's "plays games with you," he said Wednesday. "Sometimes you are almost normal, other times you are very bad.
NEWS
March 26, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday let stand the ruling of a California court that a hospital patient does not own rights to tissues taken from his body, even if they prove immensely valuable to scientists. The high court action ends a financial threat to the burgeoning field of biotechnology. By genetically altering human cells, medical researchers have been able to produce new treatments for a variety of ailments including cancer, diabetes, hepatitis and ulcers.
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