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Tissue Transplants

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Two types of experimental surgical procedures have significantly improved the conditions of patients with Parkinson's disease, surgeons said here Wednesday. Two teams of researchers independently reported that in a total of 11 patients, grafts of fetal tissue obtained during abortions sharply reduced tremors and rigidity and increased control of limb functions.
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NEWS
January 23, 1990 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With abortion rights advocates riding a wave of favorable public opinion in California, anti-abortion lobbyists and lawmakers are quietly devising a legislative strategy they hope will turn the tables and put the pro-choice side on the spot. The opponents of abortion realize that a majority of Californians, asked in the abstract, favor a woman's right to choose abortion.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court, hearing a pivotal case from the emerging field of biotechnology, was asked Tuesday to grant medical patients a broad new right to share in profits from the commercial use of their bodily tissues. The lawyer for a leukemia survivor whose cancerous spleen was removed and used in research urged the justices to open the way for a landmark lawsuit that pits a patient's claim over surgically removed organs against the asserted interests of scientific research.
NEWS
January 23, 1993 | KAREN TUMULTY and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With a stroke of a pen, President Clinton marked the 20th anniversary of Roe vs. Wade on Friday by dismantling a series of Ronald Reagan and George Bush Administration abortion restrictions, only hours after tens of thousands of anti-abortion demonstrators rallied across the street from the White House.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Bob Orth had been a telephone lineman in Santa Rosa for more than 20 years when he started developing symptoms of Parkinson's disease. By the time he had been on the job 30 years, he felt forced to retire "because I wasn't doing the job properly anymore." In retirement, the situation worsened. Parkinson's "plays games with you," he said Wednesday. "Sometimes you are almost normal, other times you are very bad.
NEWS
March 26, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday let stand the ruling of a California court that a hospital patient does not own rights to tissues taken from his body, even if they prove immensely valuable to scientists. The high court action ends a financial threat to the burgeoning field of biotechnology. By genetically altering human cells, medical researchers have been able to produce new treatments for a variety of ailments including cancer, diabetes, hepatitis and ulcers.
WORLD
August 2, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A German farmer who lost his arms in an accident has been successfully fitted with two new limbs in what is believed to be the first complete double arm transplant, his surgeons said. Reiner Gradinger, medical director at the Munich University Clinic, said doctors spent 15 hours last week attaching the arms to a 54-year-old man who had lost his just below the shoulder six years ago. "The reattachment appears up to now to have proceeded optimally," Gradinger said, adding the patient was recovering well.
WORLD
October 9, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A German farmer who received the world's first complete double arm transplant said incredulity gave way to joy when he woke from surgery and saw he had arms again. Karl Merk, 54, lost his arms just below the shoulders in a combine accident six years ago. He told reporters at the Munich University Clinic, "It was really overwhelming when I saw that I had arms again." Merk is recovering well nearly three months after his operation and can perform simple tasks such as opening doors and turning on lights.
WORLD
November 19, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Doctors have given a woman a new windpipe with tissue grown from her own bone marrow's stem cells, eliminating the need for anti-rejection drugs. The case of tuberculosis patient Claudia Castillo, a 30-year-old Colombian living in Barcelona, was published online today in the medical journal the Lancet. Scientists and doctors in Italy and Britain stripped the cells off a donor windpipe, leaving only a tube of connective tissue, and produced millions of cartilage and tissue cells from Castillo's marrow to cover it. Once they were in place, the trachea was transplanted into Castillo in June.
SCIENCE
September 17, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Israeli researchers have transplanted frozen, then thawed ovaries into sheep and then harvested functioning eggs. Two human pregnancies have been reported after transplantation of frozen ovarian tissues but not intact ovaries. Both cases have been clouded by the possibility that the women's damaged ovarian tissue had recovered and provided the eggs for the pregnancy.
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