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Tissue Transplants

NEWS
November 26, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American physician, frustrated that the Bush Administration has stymied research on clinical uses of human fetal tissue, is helping to open a center in Moscow to treat myriad illnesses--from Down's syndrome to third-degree burns--with fetal tissue. Some of Dr. Eugene Molner's fellow American doctors have expressed skepticism over the treatments' effectiveness.
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NEWS
November 26, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Bob Orth had been a telephone lineman in Santa Rosa for more than 20 years when he started developing symptoms of Parkinson's disease. By the time he had been on the job 30 years, he felt forced to retire "because I wasn't doing the job properly anymore." In retirement, the situation worsened. Parkinson's "plays games with you," he said Wednesday. "Sometimes you are almost normal, other times you are very bad.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House failed Wednesday to override President Bush's veto of legislation that would have ended a ban on fetal tissue research but supporters immediately introduced another bill aimed at allowing the work to proceed unimpeded. In an override vote of 271 to 156, supporters fell more than a dozen votes short of the two-thirds majority needed to enact the measure over the President's objection. So far, Congress has failed to override any of the President's vetoes.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As expected, President Bush on Tuesday vetoed legislation that would have overturned a federal ban on fetal tissue research, saying that such work is "inconsistent with our nation's deeply held beliefs" and that many Americans find it "morally repugnant."
NEWS
June 5, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Senate voted 85 to 12 Thursday to lift a government ban on the use of aborted fetuses in disease research, setting the stage for an expected veto by President Bush. The same measure passed the House last week on a 260-148 vote, which, unlike the Senate tally, is short of the two-thirds necessary to override the veto. Its supporters said fetal tissue holds the promise of new treatments for Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, diabetes and spinal cord injuries.
NEWS
May 29, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House approved legislation Thursday that would overturn a federal ban on fetal tissue research, but, in a politically significant victory for the Bush Administration, the vote fell short of the number needed to override an almost certain presidential veto. Although many supporters were absent for the vote, opponents--who object to the research because it involves tissue obtained through elective abortions--attracted three more votes than the one-third needed to sustain a veto.
NEWS
May 27, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Health and Human Services Secretary Otis R. Bowen on Tuesday called a controversial moratorium on fetal tissue research--first imposed while he was secretary--a "mistake" and urged speedy approval of legislation that would overturn it. He also opposed as "medically unworkable" a compromise proposal by President Bush to encourage the research as long as it was conducted only with tissue obtained through ectopic pregnancies and miscarriages rather than through elective abortions.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The White House is expected to launch a last-minute attempt today to derail expected congressional action on legislation that would overturn a federal ban on fetal-tissue research. The action is likely to come in an order by President Bush to establish a national bank and registry for tissue obtained from ectopic pregnancies and miscarriages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Two types of experimental surgical procedures have significantly improved the conditions of patients with Parkinson's disease, surgeons said here Wednesday. Two teams of researchers independently reported that in a total of 11 patients, grafts of fetal tissue obtained during abortions sharply reduced tremors and rigidity and increased control of limb functions.
NEWS
April 3, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate lifted a federal ban on fetal tissue transplant research, with a majority that could override a threatened presidential veto. A bill covering the issue was approved 87 to 10 and was sent to a conference committee. The House passed a similar measure in July. The Ronald Reagan and George Bush administrations imposed the moratorium on grounds that using the tissue for human transplants would cause an increase in the number of abortions.
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