Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTissue Transplants
IN THE NEWS

Tissue Transplants

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1994 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kaitlin Symsek, who was born missing a heart valve and couldn't walk or crawl until she received a valve transplant, will cut the ribbon today at the grand opening of the American Red Cross Western Regional Tissue Center in Costa Mesa. "We were very, very lucky that at the time she needed (a heart valve) one was even available," said Kaitlin's mother, Debby Symsek.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 5, 1994 | From Associated Press
The federal government Tuesday approved the first grant for fetal tissue research since President Clinton lifted a five-year ban on studies using cells from aborted fetuses. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke is giving $4.5 million to three institutions to study the effects of implanting fetal tissue into the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease. Dr. Patricia Grady, head of the federal institute, called the research promising.
NEWS
December 11, 1993 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration, reacting to concern in Congress, moved Friday to guarantee the safety of human tissue and bones used in 450,000 transplant operations in the United States each year. FDA Commissioner David A. Kessler said that the agency was issuing interim rules on an emergency basis after finding evidence that some "tissue brokers" may be dealing in infectious body parts, principally cadavers from Eastern Europe and Russia.
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A research clinic in Santa Barbara has entered into an agreement to import fetal tissue from Russia to transplant into diabetics. The agreement by the Sansum Clinic reflects U.S. researchers' frustrations over difficulties in obtaining fetal tissue for research purposes, despite President Clinton's recent lifting of a moratorium on the use of such tissue. This is the first agreement of its kind between U.S. researchers and Russian authorities.
NEWS
January 26, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS and THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Dr. Edward Oldfield remembers the fall weekend in 1987 when he and Dr. Robert Plunkett, a fellow neurosurgeon at the National Institutes of Health, were preparing to take a historic step--performing the world's first fetal-cell transplant on a patient suffering from Parkinson's disease. Instead, less than 48 hours before the scheduled brain surgery on a middle-aged patient, the operation was canceled as a five-year moratorium began on federal aid for fetal-tissue research.
NEWS
January 23, 1993 | KAREN TUMULTY and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With a stroke of a pen, President Clinton marked the 20th anniversary of Roe vs. Wade on Friday by dismantling a series of Ronald Reagan and George Bush Administration abortion restrictions, only hours after tens of thousands of anti-abortion demonstrators rallied across the street from the White House.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In three separate studies released today, researchers report the most convincing evidence yet that the controversial technique of implanting tissues from aborted fetuses into the brains of Parkinson's disease patients can produce significant improvements in mobility and quality of life.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American physician, frustrated that the Bush Administration has stymied research on clinical uses of human fetal tissue, is helping to open a center in Moscow to treat myriad illnesses--from Down's syndrome to third-degree burns--with fetal tissue. Some of Dr. Eugene Molner's fellow American doctors have expressed skepticism over the treatments' effectiveness.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Bob Orth had been a telephone lineman in Santa Rosa for more than 20 years when he started developing symptoms of Parkinson's disease. By the time he had been on the job 30 years, he felt forced to retire "because I wasn't doing the job properly anymore." In retirement, the situation worsened. Parkinson's "plays games with you," he said Wednesday. "Sometimes you are almost normal, other times you are very bad.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|