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Tissue Transplants

BUSINESS
August 1, 1991 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
Pioneering medical research frequently provokes ethical controversies. But no research initiative in American medicine has evoked more genuine dishonesty or more hypocrisy than the use of fetal tissue transplants to help treat victims of Parkinson's disease, diabetes and other crippling illnesses. This controversy offers a shameful example of medical innovation mismanagement. At the center of this controversy are the products of abortion: dead fetuses.
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NEWS
May 19, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
An organ transplant company reported Saturday that two people who received tissue from an AIDS-infected man have preliminarily tested positive for the deadly virus. A spokesman for LifeNet Transplantation Services, the agency that distributed the man's tissue and organs, said the two had received particularly risky "fresh-frozen" tissue grafts, which were not treated with alcohol for fear that the chemical might kill the cells. A third recipient has been identified and will be tested, he said.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Health officials continued to search Friday for 50 or more transplant recipients who may have received organs, tissue or bone grafts from a donor whose infection with the AIDS virus had gone undetected. While the potential danger of AIDS infection from organ transplants is not unknown, this is believed to be the largest number of patients affected by a single donor, federal health officials said.
NEWS
April 26, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new director of the National Institutes of Health said Thursday that while she continues to believe that it is acceptable to use fetal tissue for biomedical research, she will abide by the ban on federal funding for such work "without hesitation." Dr. Bernadine P.
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The first fetal-to-fetal tissue transplant in the United States demonstrates how physicians and parents are willing to test the boundaries of medical knowledge in an attempt to cure fatal childhood diseases. The deceptively simple experimental procedure was performed in May, 1990, by Dr. R. Nathan Slotnick of the UC Davis School of Medicine who said this week he was "still in limbo" about whether it was successful.
NEWS
April 16, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Texas couple who described themselves as anti-abortion told congressmen Monday, in often emotional testimony, why they decided to undergo a fetus-to-fetus tissue transplant in attempting to save their unborn child. "We do not agree with abortion," said the Rev. Guy Walden, a Baptist minister from Houston, his voice breaking at times. But "we believed that . . . this would be consistent with a pro-life, anti-abortion position." Theirs was the first public report of such surgery.
NEWS
March 26, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday let stand the ruling of a California court that a hospital patient does not own rights to tissues taken from his body, even if they prove immensely valuable to scientists. The high court action ends a financial threat to the burgeoning field of biotechnology. By genetically altering human cells, medical researchers have been able to produce new treatments for a variety of ailments including cancer, diabetes, hepatitis and ulcers.
NEWS
January 8, 1991 | Associated Press
Calling the government "bankrupt in dealing with ethical issues," two medical societies announced plans Monday to establish a private board to review research that uses the tissues of aborted fetuses. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Fertility Society said a board of 15 citizens would set guidelines for research in transplanting of fetal tissue and for studies involving test-tube embryos.
OPINION
October 28, 1990
Thank you for bringing up the subject of fetal tissue transplants. Unfortunately, it was little more than another example of media bias against unborn children. Out of 61 inches of print, a mere 1 inch is given to the pro-life side, a token comment by Dr. John Wilke, president of the National Right to Life Committee. While I sympathize with those who suffer from Parkinson's, I also grieve for the lives of the unborn who die from abortion. I am diminished by their wrongful deaths.
NEWS
October 17, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don Nelson didn't think of himself as a pioneer on that November day nearly two years ago when the Denver surgical team began to numb his head in preparation for brain-transplant surgery. The former factory manager, then 52, knew only that the ravages of more than two decades of Parkinson's disease had left him abruptly paralyzed several times a day. "I had no alternative," he says. "Nothing else was working."
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