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Titanic

SPORTS
November 14, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
NFL tonight INDIANAPOLIS (6-3) AT TENNESSEE (4-5) TV: NFL Network, 5:30 PST. Line: Colts by 3. Over/under: 421/2. Sam Farmer's pick: Nothing like the smelling salts of a 30-point loss to St. Louis to jar the Colts awake. They have a chance here to open a three-game lead in the AFC South, and they aren't going to let a backup quarterback beat them. Colts 24, Titans 17
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SCIENCE
October 25, 2013 | By Monte Morin
New images captured by NASA's Cassini spacecraft reveal a land of liquid methane and ethane lakes spotting the north pole of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge released the new images this week, saying that a fortunate coincidence of seasonal change and spacecraft positioning made the pictures possible. "The view from Cassini's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer gives us a holistic view of an area that we'd only seen in bits and pieces before and at lower resolution," read a statement from Jason Barnes, a participating scientist at the University of Idaho, Moscow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
Kenneth Stanley "Bud" Adams, owner of the Tennessee Titans and one of the founders of the American Football League, was found dead Monday at his Houston home. He was 90. Adams, an eccentric Texas oilman, lived alone and reportedly had not been seen since Saturday. He died of natural causes, the Titans announced. A sharply controversial figure in Houston, Adams moved the Oilers to Tennessee after the 1997 season because he could not strike a deal for a new, publicly funded stadium to replace the aging Astrodome.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2013 | By David Ng
A violin that was played by a musician on the Titanic as the ship sank in 1912 has been sold at auction for more than $1.7 million, more than triple expectations. The instrument sold at a Saturday auction in Britain for £1.1 million, or about $1.78 million. It had been estimated that the selling price would be between £200,000 and £300,000. Henry Aldridge and Son, the British auction house that specializes in Titanic-related memorabilia and that held the auction, said the instrument was discovered in 2006, and was played by second-class passenger Wallace Hartley, who was one of hundreds who perished on the tragic night of April 14, 1912.
WORLD
October 19, 2013 | By Henry Chu, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
LONDON -- The violin believed to have belonged to the bandleader on the Titanic fetched nearly $1.45 million at auction Saturday, becoming far and away the most expensive piece of memorabilia associated with the ocean liner ever to be sold. The British auction house Henry Aldridge & Son had originally expected the battered-looking instrument to sell for a third of that amount. But the legend surrounding the fiddle, its embodiment of the heroic self-sacrifice of a band that famously kept playing as the ill-fated ship met its watery doom, boosted bidding to stratospheric levels.
WORLD
October 17, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - It's probably a myth that he played the hymn “Nearer, My God, to Thee” as the great ship sank, but the battered, seawater-damaged violin believed to have belonged to the bandleader on the Titanic is to go on auction this weekend. The instrument is likely to fetch the highest amount ever for a piece of Titanic memorabilia - up to nearly half a million dollars, the English auction house Henry Aldridge & Son said Thursday. For many devotees of the Titanic and of the movies it spawned, the story of the orchestra continuing to play to comfort or distract terrified passengers remains an emotional touchstone, the epitome of courage, calm and defiance in the face of impending doom.
SPORTS
October 12, 2013 | Sam Farmer
Six weeks ago, Alterraun Verner had no guarantees he'd be a starting cornerback for the Tennessee Titans. Today, he's made as big an impact as any defensive player in the NFL. What are the odds of that? Actually, Verner could calculate those for you. He was a math major at UCLA who went back to school a year after he was drafted and finished his degree. "I wanted to knock it out as soon as I could," Verner said by phone this week, during a break from preparations for Sunday's game at Seattle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2013 | Steve Chawkins
Donkey Kong, Super Mario Brothers, Legend of Zelda: For Hiroshi Yamauchi, the hits kept coming - but he enjoyed none of them. "I have better things to do" than play video games, he told interviewers. Yamauchi, a gruff and uncompromising businessman who autocratically transformed Nintendo from a purveyor of playing cards to a gaming gargantuan, died in Japan on Thursday of pneumonia, his company said. He was 85. He ran the company for 52 years, until his retirement in 2002.
SCIENCE
August 29, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
You don't need to worry about walking on thin ice on Titan. The icy shell that encapsulates Saturn's largest moon is tougher and thicker than previously thought, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature. Like Earth's crust, Titan's icy surface floats atop a dense ocean. Earlier studies have suggested this outer layer is thin and flexible. But new data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft point to an extremely thick, rigid shell with massive underwater “roots.” While analyzing Cassini's latest gravity and topography measurements, astrophysicists at UC Santa Cruz and other institutions  noticed something unusual.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
This weekend, audiences will get the chance to watch Steve Jobs, a man they've spent decades seeing in the news or their mind's eye, on the big screen, looking a little like a famous actor. “Jobs,” Joshua Michael Stern's take on the late icon, hits theaters after earlier premiering at the Sundance Film Festival, as Ashton Kutcher puts his best bare foot forward as the Apple founder. So it goes for actors these days. Older actors want to play monarchs and presidents. Younger performers once wanted to play rock stars.
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