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December 24, 2008 | BLOOMBERG NEWS
London's National Gallery and the National Galleries of Scotland, which are campaigning to buy a $73.7-million Titian painting for the U.K. national collections, said they would announce the outcome in January. "There has been very good progress in both fundraising and the negotiation of terms for this important acquisition," the museums said in a press release Tuesday. "Our efforts to bring the campaign to a successful conclusion continue, and we will not be making any further announcements until January."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Suzanne Muchnic
"It's not about more. It's about better," says Scott Schaefer, the J. Paul Getty Museum's senior curator of paintings, a few days before his retirement. "The Getty's collections are meant to be small even though they are meant to be great. We have added 70 pictures; we have also deaccessioned 70 pictures. So the collection is the same size as when I started - about 430 paintings and pastels - but it's better," he says. As Schaefer prepares to leave his corner office at the Getty Center as well as the galleries he has visited almost daily, he leaves an impressive record of exhibitions organized under his purview.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2012 | By Nicholas Delbanco
Titian His Life Sheila Hale Harper Collins: 832 pp., $39.99 This is a long book about a long life, a large volume about a large talent. Titian, its titular subject, was the most celebrated painter of his time. He died in his beloved Venice, Italy, on Aug. 27, 1576. The death certificate listed the cause of his demise as fever and age as 103. Like so much else about the artist, however, the date of his birth remains uncertain; it's more likely he died in his late 80s. Even his name is subject to variation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2012 | By Nicholas Delbanco
Titian His Life Sheila Hale Harper Collins: 832 pp., $39.99 This is a long book about a long life, a large volume about a large talent. Titian, its titular subject, was the most celebrated painter of his time. He died in his beloved Venice, Italy, on Aug. 27, 1576. The death certificate listed the cause of his demise as fever and age as 103. Like so much else about the artist, however, the date of his birth remains uncertain; it's more likely he died in his late 80s. Even his name is subject to variation.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A British aristocrat is offering two public art galleries a $92-million bargain -- a Renaissance painting by the Italian artist Titian that has been on display in Britain for 200 years but now could be sold overseas. "Diana and Actaeon," one of Titian's greatest works, is estimated to be worth $275 million on the open market. Its owner, the duke of Sutherland, has offered it to major public galleries for a third of that price. The National Galleries of Scotland and London's National Gallery launched a public appeal Thursday for funds to buy the painting.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
The J. Paul Getty Museum has added another star picture to its increasingly high-profile collection. The new acquisition is "Venus and Adonis," a passionate love scene painted around 1555-1560 by Venetian Renaissance master Tiziano Vecellio, known as Titian. The painting will go on view in about a year after restoration and cleaning. "We're elated to have a picture of such beauty and emotional power," said museum director John Walsh, in a statement issued by the Getty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1991 | LOUISE SWEENEY, THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
When Titian painted, even royalty bowed to him. J. Carter Brown, director of the National Gallery of Art, delights in telling about it: "There are the stories of the Hapsburg (Holy Roman) Emperor Charles V leaning down and picking up a paintbrush from the floor to hand it to Titian. When you think of the stratification of European society at the time, that is an extraordinary homage." The magnificent show "Titian: Prince of Painters," at the National Gallery through Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2004
I've been deeply inspired by Mark Swed's article ("The Sound of America," Jan. 25) lauding modern composer John Cage and his "4'33"," four minutes and 33 seconds of total silence, as "an extraordinary experience."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2001
I was interested by Scott Schaefer's reference to the recently sold Berggruen Cezanne as "a B-level painting" in Suzanne Muchnic's article about his purchase of a Monet for the Getty Museum ("A High 'Light' for the Getty," July 9). If I remember my art history studies and some of the reading I have done since then, Monet has always been considered the lightweight of the Impressionists--especially when compared to Cezanne. I would be interested to learn the letter grades Schaefer would give to LACMA's Van Dyck and Titian, which he purchased.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Suzanne Muchnic
"It's not about more. It's about better," says Scott Schaefer, the J. Paul Getty Museum's senior curator of paintings, a few days before his retirement. "The Getty's collections are meant to be small even though they are meant to be great. We have added 70 pictures; we have also deaccessioned 70 pictures. So the collection is the same size as when I started - about 430 paintings and pastels - but it's better," he says. As Schaefer prepares to leave his corner office at the Getty Center as well as the galleries he has visited almost daily, he leaves an impressive record of exhibitions organized under his purview.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2012
Money raised for Titian Two major British art galleries have raised 45 million pounds ($72 million) to buy a Renaissance masterpiece that has been in the United Kingdom for 200 years and keep it on public display — a purchase announced Thursday as a substantial cultural victory in tough economic times. Britain's National Gallery contributed nearly $40 million to buy Titian's "Diana and Callisto," which it will own jointly with the National Galleries of Scotland. The rest of the money came from an art charity, lottery profits and private donors.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2011 | By Molly Selvin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Geraldine James' face — those high cheekbones, sky-blue eyes and, what one London theater critic called her "Titian locks" — might look vaguely familiar. James is 61 now but still recognizable as Sarah Layton, the pivot point and conscience of "The Jewel in the Crown. " The 14-part "Masterpiece Theater" drama on the last days of British rule in India drew wide acclaim and a huge U.S. audience when it aired in 1984, thrusting the then-thirtysomething actress to the top rank of her profession.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2009 | Stanley Meisler
Suits of armor were once so finely wrought that an attacking lance would glance off their smooth metal harmlessly. But then, as the Middle Ages moved into the Renaissance, European kings demanded that the craftsmen finish the armor with elaborate decoration. All the engraving and embossing upset the surface of the armor. A lance would no longer slip away. But that did not matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2008 | BLOOMBERG NEWS
London's National Gallery and the National Galleries of Scotland, which are campaigning to buy a $73.7-million Titian painting for the U.K. national collections, said they would announce the outcome in January. "There has been very good progress in both fundraising and the negotiation of terms for this important acquisition," the museums said in a press release Tuesday. "Our efforts to bring the campaign to a successful conclusion continue, and we will not be making any further announcements until January."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2008 | Christopher Knight, ART CRITIC
L.A.'s reticence about respecting the history of art produced in Southern California seemed to turn a corner in 2008. Ambitious and provocative exhibitions at venues large and small were joined by insightful publications and a documentary, "The Cool School." A batch of coordinated shows, scheduled for 2011, at 15 area institutions to explore postwar historical developments was also announced by the Getty Foundation, which is making $2.8 million in grants for the effort, on top of the $2.7 million already awarded to museums and libraries for archival work.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A British aristocrat is offering two public art galleries a $92-million bargain -- a Renaissance painting by the Italian artist Titian that has been on display in Britain for 200 years but now could be sold overseas. "Diana and Actaeon," one of Titian's greatest works, is estimated to be worth $275 million on the open market. Its owner, the duke of Sutherland, has offered it to major public galleries for a third of that price. The National Galleries of Scotland and London's National Gallery launched a public appeal Thursday for funds to buy the painting.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2012
Money raised for Titian Two major British art galleries have raised 45 million pounds ($72 million) to buy a Renaissance masterpiece that has been in the United Kingdom for 200 years and keep it on public display — a purchase announced Thursday as a substantial cultural victory in tough economic times. Britain's National Gallery contributed nearly $40 million to buy Titian's "Diana and Callisto," which it will own jointly with the National Galleries of Scotland. The rest of the money came from an art charity, lottery profits and private donors.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2011 | By Molly Selvin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Geraldine James' face — those high cheekbones, sky-blue eyes and, what one London theater critic called her "Titian locks" — might look vaguely familiar. James is 61 now but still recognizable as Sarah Layton, the pivot point and conscience of "The Jewel in the Crown. " The 14-part "Masterpiece Theater" drama on the last days of British rule in India drew wide acclaim and a huge U.S. audience when it aired in 1984, thrusting the then-thirtysomething actress to the top rank of her profession.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A painting displayed at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va., will be included next month in a Paris museum's show of great portraits by the Italian Renaissance master Titian. The owners of the oil portrait of the Duke of Mantua, dating to 1539 or 1540, hope the trip could restore the work's tarnished reputation and add tens of millions of dollars to its market value.
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