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Titouan Lamazou

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March 16, 1990 | DAN BYRNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Titouan Lamazou crossed the finish line in almost no wind shortly after midnight today, completing a circumnavigation in 109 days and winning the Globe Challenge solo sailing race. In so doing, Lamazou broke every record for sailing circumnavigation, solo or otherwise. He broke the solo record of 150 days, Bermuda to Bermuda, set by Dodge Morgan in 1986. He also broke the 136-day mark set by Philippe Jeantot in the 1987 BOC Challenge solo around-the-world race. That race has three stops.
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March 16, 1990 | DAN BYRNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Titouan Lamazou crossed the finish line in almost no wind shortly after midnight today, completing a circumnavigation in 109 days and winning the Globe Challenge solo sailing race. In so doing, Lamazou broke every record for sailing circumnavigation, solo or otherwise. He broke the solo record of 150 days, Bermuda to Bermuda, set by Dodge Morgan in 1986. He also broke the 136-day mark set by Philippe Jeantot in the 1987 BOC Challenge solo around-the-world race. That race has three stops.
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October 23, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
New Zealand's Peter Blake and Britain's Robin Knox-Johnston will lead a bid to win the Jules Verne Challenge Trophy and $1 million by sailing around the world in less than 80 days, beginning next January from the English Channel. The record for a nonstop circumnavigation under sail is 109 1/2 days, set by France's Titouan Lamazou in a 59-foot monohull in 1989-90. Blake and Knox-Johnston will sail an 85-foot catamaran.
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November 28, 1989 | DAN BYRNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
American Mike Plant was leading the 13-boat fleet Monday, 24 hours after the start of the Globe Challenge nonstop solo sailing race around the world. As the 60-footers headed west by southwest in a 15-knot easterly wind, Plant, of Newport, R.I. aboard Duracell, was trailed by favorite Philippe Jeantot aboard Credit Agricole in second place and Titouan Lamazou on Ecureuil Aquitaine in third. All three are veterans of the 1986-87 BOC Challenge solo around-the-world race.
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September 1, 1986 | United Press International
A yacht involved in a collision at the start of a 27,500-mile solo race around the world restarted Sunday as 23 other boats from 10 countries completed the first 100 miles in the second annual BOC Challenge. Thursday's Child, piloted by American Warren Luhrs, was hit in the stern Saturday by Ecureuil D'Aquitane, skippered by Frenchman Titouan Lamazou. Lamazou was trying to avoid a small craft when it hit Thursday's Child. Luhrs was towed to port with rudder damage and a broken antennae.
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May 4, 1987 | DAN BYRNE, Dan Byrne, a former news editor with the Los Angeles Times, was among the finishers of the first BOC Challenge in May, 1983
The three lead boats in the solo around-the-world sailing race are inside a 40-mile circle as as they close on Newport and the end of the eight-month BOC Challenge. France's Titouan Lamazou, aboard Ecureuil d'Aquitaine, remained in the lead at week's end--just 23 nautical miles ahead of Jean Yves Terlain, aboard UAP Pour Medicins Sans Frontieres.
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May 8, 1987 | DAN BYRNE, Dan Byrne, a former news editor for The Times, was among the finishers of the first BOC Challenge in May, 1983
South African John Martin, aboard Tuna Marine, crossed the finish line at Brenton Reef Tower Thursday to become the first to finish the 27,500-mile solo sailboat race around the world. Martin, 32, a lieutenant commander in the South African Navy, finished the 5,000-nautical-mile leg from Rio de Janeiro in 26 days 50 minutes. That was 2 days 16 hours faster than Frenchman Philippe Jeantot's fourth-leg time in 1983.
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