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BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | By Pat Benson
Anyone can go to their local television station and ask to see how much candidates paid for political advertisements. Now, the Federal Communications Commission wants to put that information online for everyone to see. Entertainment reporter Joe Flint says broadcasters aren't happy about that. He explains why in this video. The FCC is voting on the proposal Friday.   ALSO: Fed upgrades economic outlook Economy adds more jobs, but are they good jobs?
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NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Patt Morrison
Finally, instead of TMZ, is America saying TMI? Too much information about a celebrity? The NBC news accounts of Philip Seymour Hoffman's “secret diaries” - two volumes found in his apartment - are getting some surprising pushback. The Times' story on the NBC exclusive cites Twitter comments about the diaries - not their contents but NBC's revealing them - as “pretty tacky that anon police are offering news orgs Philip Seymour Hoffman's diary.” And so on: “simply nauseatingly intrusive” and “just despicable.” The Times' story itself attracted a comment in the same vein: “This is a ridiculous invasion of privacy ... he did not shoot up a school, murder his wife ... he killed himself, why do they need to know what's in his diary?
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BUSINESS
June 15, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Too bad ICANN didn't register .D'oh or .TMI itself. In the second recent big glitch in the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers' process to expand domains beyond the era of .com, the domain name administrator inadvertently revealed a little too much information when it posted details about the previously secret names submitted. The information online included the mailing addresses and contact information of some applicants, details that were to remain private.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Too bad ICANN didn't register .D'oh or .TMI itself. In the second recent big glitch in the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers' process to expand domains beyond the era of .com, the domain name administrator inadvertently revealed a little too much information when it posted details about the previously secret names submitted. The information online included the mailing addresses and contact information of some applicants, details that were to remain private.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1998 | E. Scott Reckard
A Superior Court judge has approved a $14-million settlement for educators who lost millions of dollars in retirement savings in the collapse of the Newport Beach company that handled their investments, Teachers Management & Investment Corp. Judge John C. Woolley late Friday approved a $14-million settlement with the accounting firm KPMG Peat Marwick and Comerica Bank-California. TMI previously settled for $4 million.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1998 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Educators who lost their retirement savings in the 1994 collapse of Teachers Management & Investment Corp. can't blame the company or its advisors for most of the losses, a receiver said Thursday. Dennis B. Schmucker of San Diego said 20,000 teachers and administrators statewide lost more than $200 million in real estate partnerships put together by TMI. Unfortunately for them, Schmucker said, "the biggest chunk of the loss was caused by the decline in the real estate market."
BUSINESS
March 5, 1996 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teachers Management & Investment Corp., which is under criminal investigation over the loss of more than $100 million in teachers' retirement funds, is trying to prevent investors from cooperating with authorities. As part of the company's effort to settle a civil fraud lawsuit, TMI has proposed that the 20,000 teacher-investors statewide stop voluntarily cooperating with state and federal authorities in the criminal investigation.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1994
Regarding the lawsuit against the present TMI management ("A Hard Investment Lesson," Sept. 19), my wife and I have been longtime investors in Teachers Management & Investment Corp. We realized even in the heady days of real estate offerings that real estate, regardless of the market, is by its very nature the least liquid of all investments. Also along with high profits and some tax write-offs there will be losses. It should be obvious to investors that 100% investment of one's retirement money into real estate is not a balanced investment portfolio.
NEWS
February 22, 1985
Some nuclear fuel melted in the reactor core during the 1979 accident at Three Mile Island, scientists disclosed in Middletown, Pa. Recent studies of rubble taken from the core show that temperatures reached about 5,100 degrees Fahrenheit, said Harold Burton, TMI project manager for EG&G Idaho. Previous examinations had indicated a maximum temperature of 4,700 degrees. But Burton and officials for GPU Nuclear Corp.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | By Pat Benson
Anyone can go to their local television station and ask to see how much candidates paid for political advertisements. Now, the Federal Communications Commission wants to put that information online for everyone to see. Entertainment reporter Joe Flint says broadcasters aren't happy about that. He explains why in this video. The FCC is voting on the proposal Friday.   ALSO: Fed upgrades economic outlook Economy adds more jobs, but are they good jobs?
NEWS
September 23, 2010
Finding out you have cancer is never fun. But having to sort through information about the disease, possible treatments and the repercussions of each can seriously compound the nightmare. To ease that process, National Comprehensive Cancer Network on Thursday released the first two of a series of guides for patients dealing with cancer. These are meant to be user-friendly versions of the network's cancer guidelines for clinicians. The guides, one for breast cancer and one for lung cancer, go through several topics, among them: how to deal with cancers caught at different stages; chemotherapy; recurrent cancer; and what constitutes follow-up.
TRAVEL
July 5, 2009 | CATHARINE HAMM
Question: What's the recommended information to include (and not to include) on one's luggage tags? I know people say you should put your cellphone number on them, but I don't keep mine turned on. Richard Wylie Torrance Answer: Vacations are all about doing things you don't usually do, so maybe this is the time to think about turning on the cellphone. And it's definitely time for travelers to rethink the luggage tag.
HEALTH
April 14, 2008 | By Anna Gosline, Special to The Times
MY MATERNAL grandmother had Alzheimer's disease. Before she died, she forgot our names, our faces and, eventually, how to speak and think.But my grandfather's heartbreak was the most painful to witness. I remember watching the two of them on the sofa together in the months before she died. My grandfather, a sometimes severe man not overly disposed to expressions of tender emotion, cooed into my grandmother's ear: "My bride, oh my bride. I love you. Do you hear me? I love you. " She just stared down blankly, folding napkins.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1998 | E. Scott Reckard
A Superior Court judge has approved a $14-million settlement for educators who lost millions of dollars in retirement savings in the collapse of the Newport Beach company that handled their investments, Teachers Management & Investment Corp. Judge John C. Woolley late Friday approved a $14-million settlement with the accounting firm KPMG Peat Marwick and Comerica Bank-California. TMI previously settled for $4 million.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1998 | James S. Granelli
Comerica Bank-California said it will not be paying any of the $14-million settlement that educators statewide reached two weeks ago with the bank and the KPMG Peat Marwick accounting firm. Comerica was a defendant in the case stemming from the 1994 collapse of Teachers Management & Investment Corp. only because it acquired Metrobank in Los Angeles. Metrobank earlier had acquired National Bank of Long Beach, the original target of allegations.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1987
Dr. Patrick F.Cadigan has been named chairman of the board for Technology Marketing Inc. of Irvine, replacing George H. Wells, who has retired from the position. Wells, one of the founders of the computer company, was president and chief executive officer since the company's inception in 1969, except for two years as vice chairman and one year as chairman of the board. He remains a director. Cadigan, a private investor and business consultant, became a director of TMI in 1987.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Patt Morrison
Finally, instead of TMZ, is America saying TMI? Too much information about a celebrity? The NBC news accounts of Philip Seymour Hoffman's “secret diaries” - two volumes found in his apartment - are getting some surprising pushback. The Times' story on the NBC exclusive cites Twitter comments about the diaries - not their contents but NBC's revealing them - as “pretty tacky that anon police are offering news orgs Philip Seymour Hoffman's diary.” And so on: “simply nauseatingly intrusive” and “just despicable.” The Times' story itself attracted a comment in the same vein: “This is a ridiculous invasion of privacy ... he did not shoot up a school, murder his wife ... he killed himself, why do they need to know what's in his diary?
BUSINESS
January 23, 1998 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Educators who lost their retirement savings in the 1994 collapse of Teachers Management & Investment Corp. can't blame the company or its advisors for most of the losses, a receiver said Thursday. Dennis B. Schmucker of San Diego said 20,000 teachers and administrators statewide lost more than $200 million in real estate partnerships put together by TMI. Unfortunately for them, Schmucker said, "the biggest chunk of the loss was caused by the decline in the real estate market."
BUSINESS
January 23, 1998 | James S. Granelli
Educators who lost their retirement savings in the 1994 collapse of Teachers Management & Investment Corp. will get back about 23 cents on the dollar, a court-appointed receiver said. Dennis B. Schmucker of San Diego said teachers and administrators who had invested $280 million in real estate partnerships put together by TMI probably will receive only about $65 million back from settlements and property sales.
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