Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTns Media Intelligence
IN THE NEWS

Tns Media Intelligence

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 25, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
U.S. advertising spending saw its biggest drop in seven years as companies cut marketing budgets to weather the economic slowdown. Ad spending fell 3.7% in the second quarter from a year earlier, the biggest decline since 2001, market researcher TNS Media Intelligence said. Advertisers are shifting to the Internet, cable television and syndicated TV to target specific audiences, TNS said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 26, 2010 | Dan Neil
The Super Bowl, which apparently is some sort of sporting event on Feb. 7, is a unique media happening: a moment when the nation comes together to adjudicate the meaning of advertising and to ratify its absurd, over-scaled importance in our culture. Yes, advertising has multiplexed and gone online, become socialized, product-integrated and user-generated. But the Super Bowl still creates the biggest single audience of the year. How advertisers choose to speak to that audience is the nearest thing we have to an instant cultural personality test.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
September 11, 2009 | Joe Flint
If you don't like the message, get a new messenger. Worried that more people are seeing their programs than is being reported, a consortium of 14 major media companies, advertisers and agencies is teaming up in an effort to develop new methods to measure how people watch their favorite TV shows. Among those participating in the venture are Time Warner Inc., Viacom Inc., CBS Corp., NBC Universal, Walt Disney Co., News Corp., Procter & Gamble Co., AT&T Inc., Unilever and advertising giant WPP Group.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2010 | By Joe Flint >>>
Want to buy a commercial to welcome Jay Leno back as host of NBC's "The Tonight Show"? It'll run you only about $35,000. If that sounds like a lot, a few years ago that ad time would have gone for $50,000. For all the hype about the futures of Leno and Conan O'Brien, the era when a comedian could be crowned the undisputed "king of late night" is, like the price of a 30-second spot in one of their shows, on the ebb -- and with it, the economics underpinning late-night TV. The world that O'Brien entered when he began his first late-night show 16 years ago is radically different from the one that will greet him when he returns to the air. Those changes are likely to shape everything from where O'Brien lands to how much he will be paid and the format of the show -- band or no band?
BUSINESS
January 4, 2010 | By Meg James
With less than five weeks to go before the game, CBS has only four commercial spots left to sell during the Super Bowl broadcast -- demonstrating that advertisers once again will elbow each other to get into TV's biggest event of the year. But will they always rush onto the field of sponsorship? One of the NFL's biggest sponsors, PepsiCo, sent a shudder through the television industry last month when it said it was benching its soft drink ads after 23 years and tens of millions of dollars of air time during the championship games.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2009 | Joe Flint
The first talent auditions for the ninth season of the Fox juggernaut "American Idol" are still two weeks away, but there is already a beauty contest going on behind the scenes. Negotiations on a new contract for Simon Cowell, the show's linchpin, chief prosecutor and animating force, are progressing quickly and could be concluded as early as this week.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2010 | Dan Neil
The Super Bowl, which apparently is some sort of sporting event on Feb. 7, is a unique media happening: a moment when the nation comes together to adjudicate the meaning of advertising and to ratify its absurd, over-scaled importance in our culture. Yes, advertising has multiplexed and gone online, become socialized, product-integrated and user-generated. But the Super Bowl still creates the biggest single audience of the year. How advertisers choose to speak to that audience is the nearest thing we have to an instant cultural personality test.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2010 | By Joe Flint >>>
Want to buy a commercial to welcome Jay Leno back as host of NBC's "The Tonight Show"? It'll run you only about $35,000. If that sounds like a lot, a few years ago that ad time would have gone for $50,000. For all the hype about the futures of Leno and Conan O'Brien, the era when a comedian could be crowned the undisputed "king of late night" is, like the price of a 30-second spot in one of their shows, on the ebb -- and with it, the economics underpinning late-night TV. The world that O'Brien entered when he began his first late-night show 16 years ago is radically different from the one that will greet him when he returns to the air. Those changes are likely to shape everything from where O'Brien lands to how much he will be paid and the format of the show -- band or no band?
BUSINESS
March 9, 2004 | From Reuters
U.S. advertising spending rose 6.1% in 2003 to $128 billion, laying the foundation for an ad industry turnaround after a multiyear slump, tracking firm TNS Media Intelligence/CMR said. Online spending rose 15.7% to $6.4 billion, cable television spending grew 15.6% and Spanish-language television spending rose 12.8%, TNS said. Local newspaper ad spending rose 13.4% to make it the single largest media category at $22.8 billion, as measured by TNS. Network TV lagged behind with 1.8% growth at $20.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2006 | From Reuters
U.S. advertising spending grew more slowly than expected in the first quarter, hurt by cutbacks in the auto industry as it took steps to reverse huge losses, according to tracking firm TNS Media Intelligence. Ad spending rose 5.2% in the first three months of the year to $34.9 billion, trailing a forecast of 5.5% growth, according to TNS, which projects 5.4% growth for all of 2006. Spending by automakers and car dealerships account for more than 10% of U.S. ad revenue.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2010 | By Meg James
With less than five weeks to go before the game, CBS has only four commercial spots left to sell during the Super Bowl broadcast -- demonstrating that advertisers once again will elbow each other to get into TV's biggest event of the year. But will they always rush onto the field of sponsorship? One of the NFL's biggest sponsors, PepsiCo, sent a shudder through the television industry last month when it said it was benching its soft drink ads after 23 years and tens of millions of dollars of air time during the championship games.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2009 | Joe Flint
If you don't like the message, get a new messenger. Worried that more people are seeing their programs than is being reported, a consortium of 14 major media companies, advertisers and agencies is teaming up in an effort to develop new methods to measure how people watch their favorite TV shows. Among those participating in the venture are Time Warner Inc., Viacom Inc., CBS Corp., NBC Universal, Walt Disney Co., News Corp., Procter & Gamble Co., AT&T Inc., Unilever and advertising giant WPP Group.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2009 | Joe Flint
The first talent auditions for the ninth season of the Fox juggernaut "American Idol" are still two weeks away, but there is already a beauty contest going on behind the scenes. Negotiations on a new contract for Simon Cowell, the show's linchpin, chief prosecutor and animating force, are progressing quickly and could be concluded as early as this week.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
U.S. advertising spending saw its biggest drop in seven years as companies cut marketing budgets to weather the economic slowdown. Ad spending fell 3.7% in the second quarter from a year earlier, the biggest decline since 2001, market researcher TNS Media Intelligence said. Advertisers are shifting to the Internet, cable television and syndicated TV to target specific audiences, TNS said.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. advertising spending is seen as "challenged" for the rest of the year after falling 0.3% in the first half to $72.6 billion, TNS Media Intelligence said. It was the first time U.S. advertising spending has fallen for two consecutive quarters since 2001, TNS said. TV ad spending dragged the market, falling 2.4% to $31.6 billion. Newspaper spending fell 5.8% to $12.9 billion. Radio spending fell 2.7% to $5.1 billion. The declines offset gains from Internet display ad spending, which rose 17.
NATIONAL
August 10, 2004 | Maria L. La Ganga, Times Staff Writer
Although Sen. John F. Kerry has essentially stopped advertising, the Democratic National Committee and like-minded organizations kept the presidential candidate's mess- age on television in battleground states and spent more than twice as much as the Bush campaign during the first week of August. President Bush surged back to the airwaves after the Democratic National Convention, spending nearly $4.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|