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FOOD
March 2, 2011 | By Amy Scattergood, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Almost half a century ago, in an epiphanic moment of marketing genius, Kellogg's is credited with inventing the Pop-Tart. Your very own individually wrapped piece of pie. In a toaster. Since that happy occasion, the Pop-Tart has become a part, literally, of the pop culture landscape: Milton the talking toaster, if you watched commercials in the '70s, or more recently last year's Times Square Pop-Tart pop-up shop. Devotees of the Pop-Tart may also remember an old Dave Barry story, in which the humorist set a strawberry Pop-Tart on fire in his toaster, just to prove he could.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
May 18, 2013
A by-no-means exhaustive list of resources follows. Please send us your favorites. Celiac Disease Foundation , based in Studio City. Information, seminars and product shows, children's summer camp. Mayo Clinic . Information on health and gluten-free products. The site http://www.findmeglutenfree.com lists restaurants by location and posts articles and more. It's one of several celiac centers around the country. The William K. Warren Medical Research Center for Celiac Disease , UC San Diego.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1989
It was particularly mind-boggling to me to read that "Voyager performed flawlessly years after its projected life span." Now that my fifth electric toaster in 10 years is conking out, I wish NASA would diversify. BOB CANNING Los Angeles
BUSINESS
April 19, 2013 | By Roger Vincent
The humble toaster isn't the first product most people would associate with counterfeiting, but nearly 15,000 of the commonplace kitchen appliances were seized by federal authorities at the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles in March. The generic-looking toasters arrived from China bearing counterfeit Underwriters Laboratories safety markings, the Department of Homeland Security said. The commonly seen UL seal cannot be secured without the approval of Underwriters Laboratories, an Illinois company founded in 1894.
MAGAZINE
July 23, 1995
Thanks for featuring Albert Valdez and his toaster lamps in "Toast of the Town" (Palm Latitudes, June 25). Please note, however, that Art O'Rama is not a product-placement facility, as was indicated, but is a consulting agency that provides film, TV and music-video productions with original artworks. PATTEE STAYROOK Santa Monica
HEALTH
June 27, 2011 | By Kathleen Clary Miller, Special to the Los Angeles Times
You would have to be in solitary confinement to have not seen that TV commercial for the iPhone that tells you that "if you don't have an iPhone" you can't download music, you can't pay for your coffee, can't easily purchase an airline ticket.... Or, as my daughter Kate called to tell me, you can't overcome OCD. Kate was diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder some years ago. Medication tempers the symptoms but does not entirely remove the underlying anxiety. Even under the cloud of Zoloft, her brain still spins — especially, for her, when it comes to making sure the door is in fact locked and the coffee maker actually turned off. She cannot sleep at night without checking doors and windows a dozen times.
NATIONAL
December 25, 2009 | By Sara Olkon
Suja Thomas, who wears holey socks, isn't giving her husband anything for Christmas. When Scott Bahr proposed to Thomas in spring 2008, he offered her a red plastic heart in place of an engagement ring. The couple's intense frugality is by design. Their idea is to save as much as possible in order to give more to those in need. This Christmas, the pair raised the stakes: Thomas and Bahr pledged to give up to $50,000 of their own money to five charities by matching donations from others.
HEALTH
May 18, 2013
A by-no-means exhaustive list of resources follows. Please send us your favorites. Celiac Disease Foundation , based in Studio City. Information, seminars and product shows, children's summer camp. Mayo Clinic . Information on health and gluten-free products. The site http://www.findmeglutenfree.com lists restaurants by location and posts articles and more. It's one of several celiac centers around the country. The William K. Warren Medical Research Center for Celiac Disease , UC San Diego.
HOME & GARDEN
May 6, 2000 | RALPH KOVEL and TERRY KOVEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Industrial design and the antiques of commerce are becoming important areas of collecting. The history of commerce and industry, lifestyles, eating habits or even methods of transportation and communication can be explained by looking at "things" of the past. Cooking began with an open fire and eventually moved indoors to a fireplace, then to a stove. The stove was then updated with electricity or gas. These new appliances and others gained some acceptance during the first decade of the 1900s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1986 | PERRY C. RIDDLE
Al Lyon may be known to his neighbors in Van Nuys as Mr . Fixit, but audiences knew him as the Gooey Gob or the Mad Man From Mars during his touring days as an ad - lib comic and musician. At 75 , Lyon still fixes an occasional toaster and keeps his customers laughing. When I started Mr. Fixit about 20 years ago in Studio City, I had a lot of tools. I had more tools than junk. Now I have more junk than tools. I've saved everything I've had, man, pieces and parts.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2011 | David Lazarus
Either Cynthia Elkins, a Woodland Hills employment lawyer, has been burning up the phone lines trying to fix the situation in the Middle East, or she's a pretty obvious victim of fraud. It's hard to draw any other conclusions after more than $20,000 in calls to places like Israel, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, the Palestinian territories and elsewhere in the region appeared on her AT&T bill. "I'm a local attorney," Elkins, 51, told me. "I don't have an international practice. I don't know anyone in these countries.
HEALTH
June 27, 2011 | By Kathleen Clary Miller, Special to the Los Angeles Times
You would have to be in solitary confinement to have not seen that TV commercial for the iPhone that tells you that "if you don't have an iPhone" you can't download music, you can't pay for your coffee, can't easily purchase an airline ticket.... Or, as my daughter Kate called to tell me, you can't overcome OCD. Kate was diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder some years ago. Medication tempers the symptoms but does not entirely remove the underlying anxiety. Even under the cloud of Zoloft, her brain still spins — especially, for her, when it comes to making sure the door is in fact locked and the coffee maker actually turned off. She cannot sleep at night without checking doors and windows a dozen times.
FOOD
March 2, 2011 | By Amy Scattergood, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Almost half a century ago, in an epiphanic moment of marketing genius, Kellogg's is credited with inventing the Pop-Tart. Your very own individually wrapped piece of pie. In a toaster. Since that happy occasion, the Pop-Tart has become a part, literally, of the pop culture landscape: Milton the talking toaster, if you watched commercials in the '70s, or more recently last year's Times Square Pop-Tart pop-up shop. Devotees of the Pop-Tart may also remember an old Dave Barry story, in which the humorist set a strawberry Pop-Tart on fire in his toaster, just to prove he could.
NATIONAL
December 25, 2009 | By Sara Olkon
Suja Thomas, who wears holey socks, isn't giving her husband anything for Christmas. When Scott Bahr proposed to Thomas in spring 2008, he offered her a red plastic heart in place of an engagement ring. The couple's intense frugality is by design. Their idea is to save as much as possible in order to give more to those in need. This Christmas, the pair raised the stakes: Thomas and Bahr pledged to give up to $50,000 of their own money to five charities by matching donations from others.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2009 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles
Celebrity chef Wolfgang Puck isn't known for burning much of anything. But his retail products are gaining a fiery reputation. About 1,500 Wolfgang Puck Toaster Oven Toasters have been recalled by W.P. Appliances Inc. and the Consumer Product Safety Commission. The reason? The toaster part of the Toaster Oven Toaster can remain on after the toast pops up, causing the elements to overheat and then catch fire, commission spokesman Scott Wolfson said Monday. W.P.
FOOD
October 15, 2008
THE "Worth It? Not Worth It?" (Oct. 8) article by Russ Parsons and Amy Scattergood about the kitchen equipment they consider a good value prompted more than 100 responses at latimes.com/food and in e-mail. Many readers took issue about whether toasters and mini food processors are indeed not worth it. -- OVERALL I agree with most of your selections. But I have had a mini Krups food processor for over 10 years and have used it probably 10 times more than my big processor.
MAGAZINE
June 3, 1990 | Amy Wallace, Amy Wallace is a reporter for the San Diego edition of The Times.
EVERYBODY IN LA JOLLA knew the Brodericks. Daniel T. Broderick III and his wife, Betty, seemed to have a classic society-page marriage. Dan was a celebrity in local legal circles. Armed with degrees from both Harvard Law School and Cornell School of Medicine, the prominent malpractice attorney was aggressive, persuasive and cunning--a $1-million-a-year lawyer at the top of his game.
FOOD
September 26, 1991 | JOAN DRAKE, TIMES FOOD MANAGING EDITOR
Toaster ovens use less energy than conventional ovens and don't heat up the kitchen as much as a full-size oven. They're handy for heating small amounts of food and take a minimum amount of counter space. These are some of the reasons toaster-oven-broilers have remained popular for 30-odd years--even in this age of the microwave oven. The models haven't changed a great deal through the years, but just how well do the multiple functions of these appliances actually perform? To find out, we borrowed four popular brands from the manufacturers for testing.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2008 | From Times Wires Services
About 210,000 General Electric toasters, manufactured in China and imported by Wal-Mart Stores Inc., are being recalled because they can short circuit and pose a fire or shock hazard, according to the retailer and the Consumer Product Safety Commission. The company has received 140 reports of incidents, but no reports of injuries. The toasters were sold at Wal-Mart stores around the country between September 2007 and July 2008. More information: (800) 638-2772 or www.cpsc.gov.
OPINION
September 26, 2006 | Dalton Conley, DALTON CONLEY is chairman of New York University's sociology department and an advisor to the Aspen Institute's Initiative on Financial Security.
IF YOU ARE OLD enough, you might remember when banks offered customers a free toaster if they opened a savings account. If you are on the younger side, you may have seen advertisements for a free iPod or even $50 cash back for new customers. Banks know that establishing the financial relationship is key and that, once you have been reeled in, they can get you to maintain an account as well as cross-market other products.
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