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BUSINESS
January 24, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
E-cigarettes, those battery-powered nicotine vapor delivery systems that are infiltrating the airwaves, schoolyards, and public spaces, are threatening to undo a decades-long campaign to stigmatize smoking. That's according to an article in the latest New England Journal of Medicine . Anti-smoking activists, the article reports, fear that e-cigs will lead to the "renormalization" of smoking. Their concern is that the rise of e-cigs will interfere with the tobacco "endgame" -- the global elimination of all tobacco use -- by returning the habit of smoking from the social margins to which it has been relegated.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1988
Isn't it about time that adults take responsibility for their own lives? Up to now they either blame their parents or the tobacco companies for their failures . . . both in life and in death! MARJORIE L. SCHWARTZ Los Angeles
WORLD
October 3, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
India banned smoking in public places, leaving public health officials with a tough task: getting the nation's estimated 120 million smokers to stub out their cigarettes. As more countries have clamped down on smoking in recent years, Indians have freely puffed away at playgrounds, railway stations, sidewalk cafes and even hospitals. No more; and a violator will get a $5 fine. For years, anti-smoking laws in the nation of nearly 1.2 billion people have been widely ignored. And tobacco companies have fought the government to keep warnings off boxes.
HEALTH
July 21, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Tobacco company rep David Howard waxes enthusiastic when he talks about a new product his employer, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., has developed: a pellet of finely cured tobacco, binders and flavoring that dissolves in the mouth in 10 minutes. Under test market in two U.S. cities — Denver and Charlotte, N.C. — Camel Orbs will join two dissolvable tobacco lozenges already on the market if it graduates to broader distribution. And Howard is optimistic it will. "These products provide smokers with an option to enjoy the pleasure of nicotine without bothering others," Howard said.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
Tobacco companies lost a court fight to overturn new restrictions on advertising in places where cigarettes are sold in Britain. Justice Richard McCombe of the High Court rejected the companies' argument that the measure was draconian and disproportionate. The restrictions, which come into force Dec. 21, severely limit the number, size, location and content of promotional materials at tobacco "points of sale," including stores, pubs and clubs. Ads must include a prominent health warning.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1990 | From Times wire services
Major American tobacco companies are manipulating trade laws and pressuring U.S. trade agencies in developing countries to ensure that markets for their products remain open, a top U.S. health official said today.
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