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Tobacco Industry Executives

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NEWS
June 2, 1994
Doonesbury is fanciful satire. Truth is, no tobacco industry executives have been indicted.
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NEWS
October 22, 1997
Daniel E. Provost III, 78, a tobacco industry executive who got Arthur Godfrey and Ronald Reagan to endorse Chesterfield cigarettes. Provost joined the J. Walter Thompson advertising agency in 1948 and was assigned to the Liggett account until his retirement in 1984 as the tobacco company's chief spokesman. He was a power in the early days of television when cigarette companies sponsored programs. People such as Godfrey and Perry Como were important Chesterfield spokesmen.
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NEWS
May 31, 1994
Editor's note: Doonesbury is fanciful satire. Truth is, no tobacco industry executives have been indicted.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Consumer activist Ralph Nader has asked the Justice Department to investigate recent across-the-board price increases by the cigarette industry, contending they appear to "constitute a conscious case of price-fixing." Nader made the request in a letter to Joel Klein, assistant attorney general in charge of the antitrust division. Nader's letter notes that late on Friday, Aug. 29, Philip Morris, the nation's leading cigarette manufacturer, announced it was raising its price by 7 cents a pack.
NEWS
May 23, 1994
Doonesbury is fanciful satire. Truth is, no tobacco industry executives have been indicted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1997
A powerful anti-smoking commercial that aired briefly across the state in late 1994 featured footage of tobacco industry executives testifying under oath before a House committee. One after another, they maintained they did not believe tobacco was addictive. The spot ended with an announcer asking, "Do they think we're stupid?" An executive of the R.J.
NEWS
September 8, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A probe of possible perjury charges against several tobacco executives has been expanded into a far-reaching Justice Department investigation, officials said. The probe will look into whether industry executives systematically made false or misleading statements to Congress and government agencies in 1994 about the addictive nature of tobacco and about industry practices. About a dozen tobacco company employees have been subpoenaed to testify before a Washington grand jury.
NEWS
June 6, 1994
Doonesbury is fanciful satire. Truth is, no tobacco industry executives have been indicted.
NEWS
May 31, 1994
Editor's note: Doonesbury is fanciful satire. Truth is, no tobacco industry executives have been indicted.
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