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Todd Zeile

SPORTS
May 16, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fred Claire has handled scores of deals during his tenure in charge of Dodger player personnel. The longtime executive vice president has made trades big and small--good and bad. But during the past decade, Claire's stamp has been on every deal the Dodgers have done. Until the biggest in franchise history. Claire acknowledged Friday night that he wasn't the point man on the seven-player deal that sent all-star catcher Mike Piazza to the Florida Marlins.
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SPORTS
December 10, 1996 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been the black hole of the Dodger organization, the deficiency that has nagged the franchise since long before it moved to Los Angeles. The Dodgers have had 22 different opening-day third basemen since moving from Brooklyn in 1958. They have used 24 third basemen since the end of the 1986 season. "It's not like we traded away anybody," said Fred Claire, executive vice president. "In fact, we've given a lot of young people opportunities at third. So it's strange.
SPORTS
September 24, 1998 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Todd Zeile--former Dodger, former Florida Marlin and current Texas Ranger third baseman--learned a valuable lesson this season. Again. "I feel I could stay [with Texas]," Zeile said. "But then, I felt I was going to stay in Los Angeles for a while. The only sure thing is a no-trade clause." Gee, after seven teams in four seasons, you'd think that one would be etched in his mind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1997 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, Times Staff Writer
There still are days when Dodger third baseman Todd Zeile wakes up, looks down at his bed, walks around his home, looks into his garage, peers out the front door, and wonders if this is really true. Wow, to be home again. Zeile, born in Van Nuys, a graduate of Hart High School in Newhall, a student at UCLA, and now living in Newhall, finally has returned home to play baseball. "It feels like I've spent 10 years in professional baseball trying to become a Dodger," Zeile says.
SPORTS
March 10, 1998 | JASON REID
Little went right for Todd Zeile at the beginning of last season, so he changed his approach in the off-season. He focused on baseball earlier than usual, hoping to improve his performance. So far, Zeile has had impressive results. Zeile hit his second and third home runs in the Dodgers' 6-4, 10-inning loss to the New York Mets on Monday at Vero Beach, Fla. "No big deal, just another wasted display of power," said Zeile, who is batting .355--11 for 31--with three homers and four runs batted in.
SPORTS
May 16, 1998 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Todd Zeile should have known better. Now in his 10th big league season, he should have known that, according to an old baseball superstition, the surest way to get shipped out of town is to set down roots. Buy a house and be assured you won't be living in it long. Sure enough, Zeile, born in the San Fernando Valley and living with his wife and two kids in Valencia, just moved into a house in Westlake Village. Of course, Zeile knows all about moving.
SPORTS
October 24, 2000 | JASON REID
Todd Zeile left the Texas Rangers in the off-season, joining the New York Mets. The veteran infielder signed a three-year, $17.34-million contract, hoping to help the Mets win a World Series championship. The Mets trail the New York Yankees, 2-0, in the best-of-seven series, and Zeile has had a frustrating experience. But the first baseman said playing for the Mets has been even better than he expected, despite their World Series problems.
SPORTS
April 5, 1997 | HELENE ELLIOTT
In an effort to get third baseman Todd Zeile going offensively after his 0-for-10 start, Dodger Manager Bill Russell dropped Zeile down a notch in the batting order before Friday's game and moved Todd Hollandsworth up. Zeile batted seventh against Pirate right-hander Esteban Loaiza and Hollandsworth batted sixth. "I put him in seventh because he's been pressing and trying to do too much or whatever," Russell said. "We're going to try something different.
SPORTS
August 22, 1997 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There were 35 minutes between games of Thursday's doubleheader at Shea Stadium. Dodger third baseman Todd Zeile used the time wisely. He fumed. He stewed. He fussed. He unleashed a river of adrenaline. By the time the second game had begun, Zeile was like a bull released from his pen. The result? Zeile smacked two singles to drive in three runs in the Dodgers' 4-3 victory over the New York Mets, giving the Dodgers a split of the two games. New York won the first game, 3-1.
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