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Tolerance

ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti sat alone in a front-row folding chair before the start of a news conference at the Simon Wiesenthal Center's Museum of Tolerance. He had just emerged from the museum's brand-new Anne Frank exhibition, which opens to the public Tuesday, and was visibly moved. "It was incredibly powerful," Garcetti said. "It's one of those visceral and transcendent exhibits - it hits you in the heart and the gut. " Gov. Jerry Brown also took time out of his schedule to attend the Monday VIP ribbon-cutting of "Anne," an interactive and fully immersive experience that honors the life and legacy of the teenager, who died in a Nazi concentration camp but left behind a diary that gave voice to the 1.5 million Jewish children murdered in the Holocaust.
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WORLD
August 18, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim and Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO - The leader of Egypt's military declared Sunday that he would not tolerate further violence as his security forces moved to suppress any fresh street protests after bloody days that saw more than 800 people killed, many of them supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted President Mohamed Morsi. The Islamist movement that ruled Egypt for a year until it was toppled by the military last month faced a defining moment as hundreds more of its members were arrested, with the interim government freezing its financial assets and vilifying it as a terrorist organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Vladimir Putin could learn a thing or two from Johnny Cummings, the openly gay mayor of the tiny but tolerant coal town of Vicco, Ky . On Wednesday night “The Colbert Report” profiled Cummings, the politician and hairdresser who helped Vicco become the smallest town in America with an ordinance on the books banning discrimination based on sexual orientation. The segment was part of the recurring feature “People Who Are Destroying America” (which, in true Colbertian fashion, tends to spotlight people doing anything but)
OPINION
August 7, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
At nine prisons across California, more than 500 inmates continuing a hunger strike they began July 8 to protest what they call cruel and inhumane conditions, and this action - the third hunger strike in two years - must surely lead many Californians to wonder: Why should we care? What concern is it to peaceful and law-abiding citizens that people convicted of serious crimes experience deprivation? Is their fate not deserved? We should care. Our treatment of prisoners, even the most dangerous and irredeemable, is a fundamental expression of American values.
OPINION
August 2, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In the next two decades about 78 million baby boomers in the U.S. will turn 65. As they age, a portion of them will be cared for by their families, and others will no doubt enter facilities for the elderly. But many will rely on a growing cadre of domestic in-home workers. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the demand for the kind of personal-care aides who can help cook, clean and bathe the elderly and disabled is expected to grow by 70% from 2010 to 2020. Today, these caregivers often labor in conditions that would not be tolerated in any other industry.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2013 | By Martin Eichner
Question: My company owns and manages several large rental communities. After very strong encouragement from our local police department, I agreed to establish a "zero tolerance" policy for criminal activity by any of our residents. If a police call to one of our properties results in a police report naming a resident, or if it results in a resident being arrested, that action constitutes the "one and final strike" against the resident. That resident and anyone else living in the same unit will be immediately evicted.
SPORTS
June 13, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Oy, camping! My backpack is the size of a Honda Fit. It has 54 pockets, 27 zippers and a functioning spleen. It weighs as much as a 9-by-12 rug with a dead Soprano rolled up inside. To shed it at the end of a long hike is the sweetest thing imaginable. We have backpacked eight miles into the wilderness, no world record but nothing to sneeze at either, eight miles straight up a broken escalator. Eight miles from the nearest bucket of ice or cheeseburger, medium rare. Me, I get too far from cheeseburgers and I start to panic a little, my breath coming in short, troubled bursts.
OPINION
June 1, 2013
Re "Uncoupling the hookup culture," Opinion, May 28 As a sexuality educator and author, I applaud Bob Laird's article. But I do have one concern. He stated that Boston University religion professor and author Donna Freitas "denigrates abstinence education. " Although she does have concerns, she has also written about its benefits. Stating that she denigrates abstinence education feeds into the terrible myths about virginity that perpetuate the hookup culture Laird decries.
WORLD
May 24, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- Residents of Stockholm braced for more violence Friday after five consecutive nights of rioting that have rocked the Swedish capital and shaken the Scandinavian country's self-image as a tolerant, liberal place. Since Sunday, sections of northwestern and southern Stockholm have lighted up with the glow of fires started by rock-throwing rioters apparently protesting a fatal shooting by police last week. Schools, shops, a library and about 150 vehicles have been set ablaze during the nightly rampages, which some commentators say are rooted in feelings of despair and disenfranchisement among the city's poor and its growing immigrant population.
WORLD
May 24, 2013 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - The streets of Stockholm were quieter late Friday after five consecutive nights of rioting that rocked the Swedish capital and shook the Scandinavian country's self-image as a tolerant, liberal place. Since Sunday, sections of northwest and south Stockholm have been lighted up with the glow of fires started by rock-throwing rioters, apparently protesting a fatal shooting by police last week. Schools, shops, a library and about 150 vehicles were set ablaze during the nightly rampages, which some commentators say are rooted in feelings of despair and disenfranchisement among the city's poor and its growing immigrant population.
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