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NEWS
November 4, 2012
"When is the best time to buy and plant freesia bulbs?" That was the question that came into our Garden Clinic from Moorpark reader Alan Dorfman. For an answer we turned to Alan Uchida, a third-generation nurseryman at Bellefontaine Nursery , which his family has run in Pasadena since 1939. Uchida's response: Freesia bulbs are actually thick underground stems called corms. They are best planted in the fall. Two types of hybrids, Dutch and Tecolote, are usually sold as single or double flowers in bright red, pink or yellow, as well as white.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2012 | By Cindy Chang, Los Angeles Times
In the nearly two decades since Californians voted to bar undocumented immigrants from utilizing public schools and hospitals, the state's electorate has become increasingly tolerant toward people who are in the country illegally, although it remains tough on border security and enforcement, a new USC Dornsife/ Los Angeles Times poll shows. The shift is partly explained by the growing clout of Latinos, who now make up 20% of California voters. But the attitudes of whites also appear to have changed.
SPORTS
October 21, 2012 | By Mike Bresnahan
Jack Nicholson wasn't in his courtside seat. Denzel Washington, Magic Johnson and Dyan Cannon weren't there, either. They missed the good, the bad and the Dwight. Dwight Howard was mostly solid in his Lakers debut, dominant at times and sprinkling in just enough mistakes to remind everybody he went 197 days without playing a game. Howard had 19 points, 12 rebounds, four blocked shots and five turnovers in almost 33 minutes as the Lakers lost to Sacramento, 99-92, in an exhibition game Sunday night at Staples Center.
OPINION
October 14, 2012 | By David N. Myers
In August 2009, an Israeli academic and political activist by the name of Neve Gordon published an Op-Ed article in the Los Angeles Times in which he reluctantly called for a gradual international boycott against his own nation. Gordon felt that such dramatic action was required to overcome the deep structural inequities between Jews and Arabs in Israeli society and the occupied territories, and to force the government back toward the goal of a two-state solution. Three years later, Gordon's academic home, the Department of Politics and Government of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, is on the verge of being closed down by the Israeli Council for Higher Education, a highly unusual act in Israel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2012 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
In two days, Southern Californians will get to celebrate "Good Wednesday. " This is not a religious event, but a day when the scorching, humid temperatures that have afflicted the region for the better part of two months is expected to break. After near triple-digit heat in downtown Los Angeles, the region will see temperatures in the more tolerable mid-80s, with a deeper migration of sea breezes, said Ryan Kittell, a meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Oxnard. It'll be a break from an August and September that largely flipped the script on a year that had actually been cooler than normal through July.
WORLD
September 16, 2012 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - Pope Benedict XVI closed a three-day visit to Lebanon on Sunday with an impassioned plea for peace, reconciliation and interreligious harmony, the themes that have dominated his discourse here. "I will appeal to all of you to be peacemakers, wherever you find yourselves," Benedict told several hundred thousand worshipers in an open-air seaside Mass, the culminating event of his trip. "In a world where violence constantly leaves behind its grim trail of death and destruction, to serve justice and peace is urgently necessary for building a fraternal society, for building fellowship.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2012 | By Karen Wada
The show: "One Person Crying: Women and War" at the Museum of Tolerance The concept : War is often seen as the domain of men, but L.A.-based photographer Marissa Roth wants to draw attention to its devastating, often long-lasting effect on women. "Whether you are in Bosnia or Belfast or Phnom Penh," she says, "women are dealing with the aftermath: how to grieve, how to keep the family together, how to keep food on the table. " What you'll see: Roth's portraits of mothers, widows, survivors and activists that were taken over 28 years and represent the social, emotional and physical effects of a dozen conflicts from World War II to the war in Iraq.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2012 | Gale Holland
Ian White was taking his toddler son up into the hills above Altadena when he spotted the long-lost gravestone of abolitionist Owen Brown in a dirt patch off the trail. Owen Brown survived the ill-fated Harper's Ferry raid led by his radical abolitionist father John Brown and later retreated to a hilltop rancho in Altadena. When he died in 1889, he received a hero's funeral. His lonely grave site is in the scrub on a hill above Altadena named Little Round Top, after the strategic hill at the battle of Gettysburg.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By James Rainey
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Mitt Romney must be wondering what he has to do to win the love of conservative stalwart William Kristol. The Republican presidential candidate might have thought he would earn some degree of insulation from Kristol's ideological and tactical arrows when he picked Kristol-favorite Paul Ryan as his vice presidential candidate. No such luck. Kristol, the Weekly Standard editor and onetime chief of staff to Vice President Dan Quayle, fired off a couple more salvos in what has been a long-running barrage against Romney; the most recent shots coming after what was supposed to be the Republican's Unity Conclave (read: Convention)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Josh Garcia got his first police citation in sixth grade for spray-painting graffiti at his middle school. Then came four more tickets for truancy and violating curfew. The worst was at Roosevelt High in Boyle Heights, where he got caught with brass knuckles and was sentenced to weekend detention in Central Juvenile Hall - a scary experience, he said. By senior year, Garcia had had so many run-ins with the law and fallen so far behind in school that he failed to pass the high school exit exam or earn enough credits to graduate.
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