Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTom Candiotti
IN THE NEWS

Tom Candiotti

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
October 8, 1991 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The one, Jack Morris, was thought by some to be through, his stuff and stamina left in the 1980s, when he was baseball's winningest pitcher. The other, Tom Candiotti, seemed destined to spend another long summer in the cellar with the Cleveland Indians. But tonight, when the Minnesota Twins play the Toronto Blue Jays in the opening game of the best-of-seven series for the American League pennant, the redeemed Morris and revived Candiotti will be the starting pitchers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 2, 2000 | TIM BROWN
The Angels released veteran knuckleballer Tom Candiotti after Saturday's exhibition game and purchased the contracts of left-hander Kent Mercker and infielder Benji Gil, moves that brought their roster to the required 25. Though he pitched decently, particularly in relief, Candiotti would have kept young pitchers Mike Fyhrie or Lou Pote out of the major leagues. Both made the opening-day roster.
Advertisement
SPORTS
July 31, 1994 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the flamethrowers and the precision artists, there exists a pitcher of another kind, the oft-overlooked knuckleballer, whose success can sometimes be spoiled by something as trivial as a broken fingernail. Tom Candiotti is the only knuckleball pitcher remaining in the major leagues, a legacy that extends to the few who came before him, but who will come after him? "I'm a dinosaur," Candiotti says.
SPORTS
March 19, 2000 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The beauty of spring training for knuckleball pitchers in Arizona is that you can give up seven runs on 12 hits in five innings, as Angel right-hander Tom Candiotti did in a 9-3 Cactus League loss to the Arizona Diamondbacks on Saturday, and laugh about it afterward. "I hope you guys had more fun than me," Candiotti joked when approached by reporters. "Everyone knows once you get out of this climate, the knuckleball works better."
SPORTS
February 11, 1989
The Cleveland Indians avoided an arbitration hearing by signing pitcher Tom Candiotti, who was 14-8 with a 3.28 earned-run average last season. Candiotti had sought $560,000 in his arbitration case and the club had offered $470,000.
SPORTS
August 15, 1993 | JIM MURRAY
Picture if you will somebody coming into a room to find Mozart tinkling on a piano and exploding, "Amadeus! How many times I got to tell you, stick to the accordion. You'll never get anywhere with those little night music shticks." Or supposing they found Heifetz drawing a bow across his violin and shouted, "No, no, no, Jascha! Enough with the Bruch concertos, you gotta play some hoedown music for the square dances. That's where the money is."
SPORTS
June 19, 1994 | TIM KAWAKAMI
Ramon Martinez started Saturday's game against Colorado in place of scheduled starting pitcher Tom Candiotti, who was scratched about 4 p.m. because of a sore toe on his right foot. "(Candiotti) wanted to try it, but there's no sense in doing that, maybe hurt something else," pitching coach Ron Perranoski said. "I asked Ramon if he'd be OK, and he said yeah." Martinez started Saturday on his regular four days of rest, and Pedro Astacio is scheduled to pitch today, also on four days' rest.
SPORTS
December 15, 1995 | BOB NIGHTENGALE
While the Dodgers moved closer to signing free-agent starter Tom Candiotti to a two-year contract, they re-signed third baseman Dave Hansen and left-handed reliever Mark Guthrie to one-year deals. "I hope it all works out in the next couple of days," said Candiotti, who also is being pursued by the Toronto Blue Jays. Guthrie, the Dodgers' top left-handed reliever, signed for $870,000.
SPORTS
June 2, 1994 | MARYANN HUDSON
Tom Candiotti was examined Wednesday by Robert Watkins for a neck pain he has had the last month and learned he has inflammation. "It doesn't affect my arm strength, but it did affect how I was throwing before, when I wasn't getting my arm up. And Ron (Perranoski) saw that and we made some adjustments," said Candiotti, who is being treated. "You might have noticed my grimacing out there on the mound, because it makes it uncomfortable to keep my arm up. It's easier to not come over the top.
SPORTS
March 1, 1992 | BILL PLASCHKE
Tom Candiotti has been told that he no longer will pitch regular batting practice. "Because they want to give the hitters a chance, I will only face two hitters, a righty and a lefty, in simulated games," said Candiotti, who pitched his first simulated game Friday. "I guess I can't blame them." Such games also give him a chance to work with Mike Scioscia on catching a knuckleball under game conditions. "It's not easy," Scioscia said. "It's going to take a little working together.
SPORTS
August 28, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Red Sox's domination of Oakland began with their opening-day win over Tom Candiotti and ended with Candiotti's victory Thursday night. The Athletics, who entered the game with a 1-9 record and .204 batting average against Boston, won, 6-3, behind a 13-hit attack and a strong six-inning performance by Candiotti. Candiotti (10-14) won for the fifth time in his last six starts. He began the season with a 2-0 loss to Boston's Pedro Martinez in which the Athletics managed only four hits.
SPORTS
August 6, 1998 | From Associated Press
Hideki Irabu gave up only two hits Wednesday night at Oakland. Both were costly. Tom Candiotti threw some pitches that wouldn't have gotten a ticket on the expressway outside Oakland Alameda Coliseum, but they were good enough to baffle New York in the Athletics' 3-1 victory that averted a four-game New York Yankee sweep. Candiotti's knuckleball held New York to four hits and gave him his second victory in a row after he had lost nine of 10 decisions.
SPORTS
March 3, 1998 | Ross Newhan
The knuckleball tends to lose movement in the dry air of Arizona, so Tom Candiotti went to the hard stuff. The former Dodger pitcher considered Brett Butler's rip of Mike Piazza and said, "I guess when you're out of baseball you can say stuff like that, but you would think he'd have the time now to look at himself in the mirror. "If you went to Mike, he'd probably tell you that Brett Butler was a lot of the problem and a lot of people probably would." Suddenly, "March madness" has a new meaning.
SPORTS
December 9, 1997 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Dodgers moved to fill their hole at shortstop Monday, reacquiring free agent Jose Vizcaino, as expected, and seemingly completing their major off-season acquisitions. Terms of the three-year deal were not released, but baseball sources said Vizcaino, 29, received a package worth $9.5 million--$3 million in 1998 and '99 and $3.5 million in 2000. He made $2.8 million with the San Francisco Giants last season. Also Monday, former Dodger pitcher Tom Candiotti agreed to a two-year, $6.
SPORTS
October 29, 1997 | JASON REID
Beginning an off-season of change for the Dodgers, pitching coach Dave Wallace on Tuesday accepted the position of assistant to the general manager of the New York Mets. Wallace, the Dodger pitching coach since 1995, accepted the front-office job to be closer to his home in Massachusetts, baseball sources said. Wallace couldn't be reached for comment.
SPORTS
September 14, 1997 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Are the Dodgers choking? "It seems to me," one club employee said, watching the players eat in the clubhouse, "that nobody is having trouble digesting their food." Maybe not, but it's pretty tough for them to swallow a few other things lately, such as their 5-1 loss to the Houston Astros on Saturday night at the Astrodome, the Dodgers' fifth defeat in a row and eighth in their last 11 games. Talk about hard to digest.
SPORTS
September 12, 1997 | STEVE SPRINGER
Opponent--Houston Astros, three games. * Site--Astrodome. * Tonight--5. * TV--Channel 5 today, Saturday and Sunday. * Radio--KABC (790), KWKW (1330). * Records--Dodgers 81-65, Astros 73-72. * Record vs. Astros--3-5. DODGERS' CHAN HO PARK (13-6, 3.31 ERA) vs. ASTROS' SHANE REYNOLDS (6-10, 4.42 ERA) * Update--This is the start of a seven-game trip that includes two in St. Louis and a two-game showdown in San Francisco next Wednesday and Thursday.
SPORTS
October 29, 1997 | JASON REID
Beginning an off-season of change for the Dodgers, pitching coach Dave Wallace on Tuesday accepted the position of assistant to the general manager of the New York Mets. Wallace, the Dodger pitching coach since 1995, accepted the front-office job to be closer to his home in Massachusetts, baseball sources said. Wallace couldn't be reached for comment.
SPORTS
September 12, 1997 | STEVE SPRINGER
Opponent--Houston Astros, three games. * Site--Astrodome. * Tonight--5. * TV--Channel 5 today, Saturday and Sunday. * Radio--KABC (790), KWKW (1330). * Records--Dodgers 81-65, Astros 73-72. * Record vs. Astros--3-5. DODGERS' CHAN HO PARK (13-6, 3.31 ERA) vs. ASTROS' SHANE REYNOLDS (6-10, 4.42 ERA) * Update--This is the start of a seven-game trip that includes two in St. Louis and a two-game showdown in San Francisco next Wednesday and Thursday.
SPORTS
September 8, 1997 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pressure of playing in his hometown was getting to Todd Zeile. He found no relief at third base. He found no relief at home plate But ultimately, he found it in his own home. From his own wife. Zeile learned to relax and have days such as Sunday, when his first-inning grand slam sent the Dodgers on their way to a 9-5 victory over the Florida Marlins at Dodger Stadium in front of a crowd of 36,757.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|