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Tom Clancy

ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1989 | JAY SHARBUTT
Stage 15, Paramount Studios, a typical Hollywood day. Sean Connery of Scotland is being made up to play a Soviet navy officer. Producer Mace Neufeld is praying for bad weather for an important sea shot near San Pedro. Co-star Sam Neill is rehearsing. The set is a 16-ton mock-up of a Soviet sub's control room, mounted on a huge mechanically maneuverable platform 22 feet above Stage 15's concrete floor. "Full left rudder!" Neill barks, and as he does, there is a quake. A real one, 4.
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BOOKS
August 21, 1994 | John Calvin Batchelor, John Calvin Batchelor's new novel, "Father's Day," will be published this fall
Tom Clancy is America's most wish-fulfilling policy-maker, and in his eighth spectacular and scary novel, "Debt of Honor," he plunges America into a foreign policy that is at once unthinkable and very thrilling--a campaign that the present State and Defense departments can only wish they had the talent to fight. Real war with Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1995 | DANIEL HOWARD CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Giving your book to Hollywood is like turning your daughter over to a pimp," Tom Clancy was quoted as saying more than once during the battles he had with Paramount Pictures over the film adaptations of his best-selling political yarns "Patriot Games" and "Clear and Present Danger." But Clancy's Cold War with Hollywood seems to be ending. His first TV project, the four-hour miniseries "Tom Clancy's 'Op Center,' " airs Sunday and Feb. 27 on NBC.
BOOKS
September 10, 1989 | Penny Lernoux, Lernoux is a U.S. journalist who has lived in Colombia since 1970. Her most recent book is "People of God: The Struggle for World Catholicism" (Viking). and
Although publicists have been known to go to extraordinary lengths to create interest in a new book, all G. P. Putnam's Sons had to do to promote Tom Clancy's latest novel was to let events follow their course in Colombia. The central thesis of Clancy's book, however, a secret invasion of Colombia by elite U.S. troops, is scarcely new. Credit for that ingenuous idea seems to belong to New York City Mayor Ed Koch, who first suggested a "friendly" invasion.
NEWS
June 21, 1994 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His bid for Patriot games fell short, but author Tom Clancy is still in the hunt for a blue-and-gold October--and September, November and December, for that matter. Had former New England Patriots owner James Orthwein not kept his promise to give local investors the first chance to buy his team, Clancy might not be pursuing the Rams today.
BOOKS
August 14, 1988 | Jack Miles
If the Strategic Defense Initiative is so full of holes, then why are the Soviets so eager to stop it? Do they know something we don't know? This leading question was for a long while the best defense of SDI against its many scientific and political attackers. An answer to that leading question is the premise of Tom Clancy's new novel. Yes, the premise goes, the Soviets do indeed know something we don't know.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
Judith Krantz is angry. No, she's madder than angry. Judith Krantz is livid, raging, fuming, and any other adjective you can find to describe her fury. "They keep telling me they feel as bad as I do. Like hell they do," she says peevishly. "Nobody feels as bad as I do." Why is the diminutive, dainty and usually demure Bel-Air author seeming like her evil twin this morning? (Surely, that was a Krantz plot sometime.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Chris Lee
Chris Pine was well aware of his action-hero options. Accepting the lead role in "Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit" - the $60-million thriller that hits theaters Friday - the actor became the fourth man to portray novelist Tom Clancy's iconic CIA super-spy character over the course of a five-film franchise that has spanned nearly a quarter of a century and generated more than $787 million at the box office. As such, Pine's performance could have paid implicit homage to those who came before him. He might have channeled the brisk efficiency of Alec Baldwin's submarine-bound Ryan in "The Hunt for Red October," Harrison Ford's reluctant (and frequently grimacing)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
We all know you can't tell a book by its cover, but can you tell a film by its release date? Where "Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit," is concerned, that becomes a bit of a trick question. A glance at the calendar reminds us that this tale of espionage and derring-do starring Chris Pine as CIA analyst Jack Ryan is coming to theaters in January, the traditional elephant burial ground for major studio releases. But before "The Wolf of Wall Street" dislodged it into 2014, "Jack Ryan" possessed a coveted Christmas slot all its own. So is this film a holiday gem slumming in the low-rent district, or a tawdry impostor stripped of ideas above its station?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1990 | PAT H. BROESKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Will moviegoers rally to a Cold War thriller in the aftermath of the Big Thaw? The question hovers in the air like nuclear fallout, as Paramount Pictures readies to launch its $35 million-plus screen adaptation of Tom Clancy's best-selling novel, "The Hunt for Red October." Starring Sean Connery and Alec Baldwin, and directed by action meister John McTiernan ("Die Hard"), the film surfaces Friday at 1,225 theaters across the country.
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