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Tom Gerard

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NEWS
May 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tom Gerard, the former police officer arrested upon his return from the Philippines in a spying controversy here, was charged with four counts of stealing government documents and one count of conspiracy. Gerard, 50, is to be arraigned Wednesday. He is accused of leaking confidential police intelligence files to Roy Bullock, a longtime investigator for the Anti-Defamation League. The two men also are suspected of selling information to the government of South Africa.
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NEWS
May 28, 1994 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former police officer Tom Gerard, who fled to the Philippines after he was accused of spying for the Anti-Defamation League, pleaded no contest Friday to one charge of illegally accessing police computer records. Gerard's plea brings to a close the spying scandal that rocked the prominent Jewish civil rights group last year and outraged thousands of people and activist groups targeted by the league's private intelligence operation.
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NEWS
May 28, 1994 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former police officer Tom Gerard, who fled to the Philippines after he was accused of spying for the Anti-Defamation League, pleaded no contest Friday to one charge of illegally accessing police computer records. Gerard's plea brings to a close the spying scandal that rocked the prominent Jewish civil rights group last year and outraged thousands of people and activist groups targeted by the league's private intelligence operation.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tom Gerard, the former police officer arrested upon his return from the Philippines in a spying controversy here, was charged with four counts of stealing government documents and one count of conspiracy. Gerard, 50, is to be arraigned Wednesday. He is accused of leaking confidential police intelligence files to Roy Bullock, a longtime investigator for the Anti-Defamation League. The two men also are suspected of selling information to the government of South Africa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1993
Your editorial "A Line Never to Be Crossed" (April 14) with regard to the Anti-Defamation League was, for the most part, right on target. As you correctly noted, "it is no surprise that the ADL has kept close tabs on individuals and groups of all stripes that trade in hate or violence. . . ." Indeed, for decades reports of the Anti-Defamation League have served as background material for The Times as well as countless other journalists, legislators and the public. Where your editorial goes astray is imputing to the Anti-Defamation League the collecting of information on groups such as the NAACP, television station KQED, Times correspondent Scott Kraft, et al. In the frenzy to report allegations and information from an affidavit made public by the San Francisco district attorney's office, few reporters have bothered to distinguish between material from the files of the Anti-Defamation League and that taken from the homes of Roy Bullock and Tom Gerard.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the outside world, Roy Bullock was a small-time art dealer who operated from his house in the Castro District. In reality, he was an undercover spy who picked through garbage and amassed secret files for the Anti-Defamation League for nearly 40 years. His code name at the prominent Jewish organization was Cal, and he was so successful at infiltrating political groups that he was once chosen to head an Arab-American delegation that visited Rep.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thomas J. Gerard, the former San Francisco police officer who fled here after being accused of passing confidential files to the Anti-Defamation League, enjoyed a private prank as he traveled the world for the Central Intelligence Agency. Among the many passports and other fake identity papers that he used as an undercover CIA agent from 1982 through 1985 were five documents identifying him as Thomas P. Clouseau--as in Inspector Clouseau, the bumbling French detective in the Pink Panther films.
NEWS
June 25, 1993 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several Arab-American groups filed damage claims Thursday against police and sheriff's agencies in Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego in connection with allegations that confidential police information was provided to the Anti-Defamation League. The claims are legally required before the groups--including the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee and the National Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1993 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police officials on Wednesday acknowledged that they had disciplined an employee suspected of using a department computer to get information on a relative, and that they are considering tighter restrictions on the use of the computers. Lt. Marc Hedgpeth, the administration bureau commander, said the department may limit the number of people authorized to use the computers and restrict the information employees can get.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen people who claim that an Anti-Defamation League spy network violated their privacy rights, including the wife of former Rep. Pete McCloskey and the son of former Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Arens, filed a class-action lawsuit Wednesday against the group and two undercover operatives.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thomas J. Gerard, the former San Francisco police officer who fled here after being accused of passing confidential files to the Anti-Defamation League, enjoyed a private prank as he traveled the world for the Central Intelligence Agency. Among the many passports and other fake identity papers that he used as an undercover CIA agent from 1982 through 1985 were five documents identifying him as Thomas P. Clouseau--as in Inspector Clouseau, the bumbling French detective in the Pink Panther films.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1993
Your editorial "A Line Never to Be Crossed" (April 14) with regard to the Anti-Defamation League was, for the most part, right on target. As you correctly noted, "it is no surprise that the ADL has kept close tabs on individuals and groups of all stripes that trade in hate or violence. . . ." Indeed, for decades reports of the Anti-Defamation League have served as background material for The Times as well as countless other journalists, legislators and the public. Where your editorial goes astray is imputing to the Anti-Defamation League the collecting of information on groups such as the NAACP, television station KQED, Times correspondent Scott Kraft, et al. In the frenzy to report allegations and information from an affidavit made public by the San Francisco district attorney's office, few reporters have bothered to distinguish between material from the files of the Anti-Defamation League and that taken from the homes of Roy Bullock and Tom Gerard.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the outside world, Roy Bullock was a small-time art dealer who operated from his house in the Castro District. In reality, he was an undercover spy who picked through garbage and amassed secret files for the Anti-Defamation League for nearly 40 years. His code name at the prominent Jewish organization was Cal, and he was so successful at infiltrating political groups that he was once chosen to head an Arab-American delegation that visited Rep.
NEWS
February 26, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A private intelligence network with ties to an American Jewish group and South Africa is under investigation for illegally tapping into police sources and collecting information on the political activities of more than 12,000 people, authorities say. As part of the investigation, San Francisco authorities say they have confiscated files containing personal information on a wide range of political activists, ethnic advocates, writers and other U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1993 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications. and
Partly to offset the bad international publicity surrounding its expulsion of more than 400 Palestinians, the Israeli government is now claiming that Hamas, the Islamic fundamentalist group of which the deported Palestinians were supposedly leaders, is financed from the UnitedStates. On Jan. 27, Ehud Yaari, an Israeli with longstanding contacts with that country's intelligence organizations, published an article in the New York Times alleging the Hamas/Arab-American ties.
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