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Tom Hanks

ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1986 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Give Tom Hanks a prop and he'll give you a performance. Sitting in front of a makeup mirror preparing for a TV appearance, the brash young Hollywood star was seeing what kinds of laughs he could wring from a green foam Statue of Liberty crown. First, he flipped it over and wore it down below his eyes, spikes down. "Look," he exclaimed. "Whoopi Goldberg!" Then he lifted the crown and fitted it around his shoulder. "Aha!" he said. " 'The Road Warrior.' " It's no wonder Hanks was in high spirits.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1995 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By just about any standard you can think of, Peter Scolari is a whopping success. He's been acting on TV for the past 16 years. He's had hit shows and Emmy nominations. He's well paid, has a home in Ojai, a wife and two sons. He has an offer to star in a Broadway musical. His new sitcom, "Dweebs," gets its second airing tonight on CBS. Only there's this one problem--one of his dearest friends, actually: Tom Hanks.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1995 | JOE LEYDON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The moon mission that turned into a nightmare for astronauts Jim Lovell, Fred Haise and Jack Swigert was a dream come true for Tom Hanks. But, then again, the Apollo 13 astronauts were on board a crippled spacecraft that might have burnt to a crisp while re-entering the Earth's atmosphere, or simply drifted into oblivion somewhere in the unforgiving blackness of space.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | CHARLES McNULTY, THEATER CRITIC
In the program for "Lucky Guy," the play Nora Ephron raced to complete before her death last year, there's a note by the author titled "Journalism: A Love Story. " That's a pretty good description of the drama, Ephron's valentine to New York City's smoke-filled, hangover-zonked newsrooms during the fierce tabloid wars of the 1980s and '90s. This was the period when racial tensions were soaring, the crack epidemic was in full swing and the streets were so tough it wasn't always easy to tell the good guys from the bad. Chronicling this tumult were three pugnacious newspapers -- the New York Post, the New York Daily News and the newcomer, New York Newsday -- which fought for readers' attention subway car by subway car, their covers singling out heroes and villains in the town's cast of corkers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1995 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mary Armitage came not for 15 minutes of fame, but 15 seconds. The 38-year-old Yorba Linda social services worker was one of more than 1,000 people Saturday who converged on Garden Grove's Hyatt Regency Alicante hotel for a shot at playing an extra in a new Tom Hanks film. The film, "That Thing You Do," charts the rise of a 1960s rock 'n' roll band from a small town in Pennsylvania to the big time in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1993 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Sleepless in Seattle" (citywide), a real charmer, is a romantic comedy about an ultimate long-distance relationship. Emphasize "romantic." Emphasize "comedy." It delivers both. The "Sleepless" lovers--Tom Hanks as Sam, the insomniac Seattle widower-architect, and Meg Ryan as Annie, the streetwise Baltimore journalist--not only live in different cities on different coasts, they don't even know each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2002 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Although it remained the No. 1 movie, "Men in Black II" got knocked down a peg in its second weekend as a quartet of new films sapped business from the powerhouse sequel, led by Tom Hanks in the period drama "Road to Perdition" and the dragon-slayer film "Reign of Fire" with Christian Bale and Matthew McConaughey.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1996 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The zippy, nostalgic comedy "That Thing You Do!" marks not only Tom Hanks' feature film directing debut. It's also his on-screen reunion with actor Peter Scolari. Hanks and Scolari got their big breaks 16 years ago starring in the ABC comedy series "Bosom Buddies." Scolari's Henry Desmond and Hanks' Kip Wilson were junior copywriters at a New York ad agency who dressed in drag in order to get a room in a women's-only hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a ceremony that was warm, funny, patriotic and sometimes even raucous, Tom Hanks received the American Film Institute's 30th annual Life Achievement Award on Wednesday evening at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The two-time Oscar winner joins the ranks of such Hollywood luminaries as John Ford, James Cagney, Orson Welles, Barbra Streisand, Sidney Poitier, Steven Spielberg, Gregory Peck, Jack Lemmon and Billy Wilder who have previously received the AFI honor over the past three decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1988 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
What makes a person funny? What drives someone to stand in front of a dark and smoke-filled hall, trying to pry laughter out of a sea of strange faces--which together have the power to send a comic home drunk on adrenaline, or leave an ego in shards on a lonely stage? Tom Hanks still doesn't know the answer to the second question. But he does know something about the first.
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