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Tom Hanks

ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a ceremony that was warm, funny, patriotic and sometimes even raucous, Tom Hanks received the American Film Institute's 30th annual Life Achievement Award on Wednesday evening at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The two-time Oscar winner joins the ranks of such Hollywood luminaries as John Ford, James Cagney, Orson Welles, Barbra Streisand, Sidney Poitier, Steven Spielberg, Gregory Peck, Jack Lemmon and Billy Wilder who have previously received the AFI honor over the past three decades.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1988 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
What makes a person funny? What drives someone to stand in front of a dark and smoke-filled hall, trying to pry laughter out of a sea of strange faces--which together have the power to send a comic home drunk on adrenaline, or leave an ego in shards on a lonely stage? Tom Hanks still doesn't know the answer to the second question. But he does know something about the first.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1999 | AMY WALLACE, Amy Wallace is a Times staff writer
Steve Martin cornered Tom Hanks at a party a few months ago and asked the two-time Oscar winner the question that has occurred at least once to any perceptive moviegoer. "You've become this great actor," Martin, a fellow funny-man turned actor-director-writer, said to Hanks. "I'm curious what took you there. What did you do?"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1992 | JOE RHODES, Joe Rhodes is a free-lance writer based in Los Angeles
It was not the way Tom Hanks was accustomed to seeing himself on screen. He'd put on nearly 20 pounds to play washed-up big league ballplayer Jimmy Dugan in "A League of Their Own," the story of an all-female professional baseball league formed during World War II.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1998 | Paul Brownfield, Paul Brownfield is a Times staff writer
Tom Hanks comes bounding into a posh suite at the Lowell Hotel, instantly jokey and down-to-earth. It doesn't matter that he's nursing a cold or that he's facing an all-night shoot on the set of his latest movie, the romantic comedy "You've Got Mail."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1995 | Claudia Eller, Claudia Eller is The Times' movie editor. and
'Open the door. Let my people go!" bellows director Ron Howard. As the heavy metal door to Stage 34 at Universal Studios is pried open, the cast and crew of Howard's latest production, "Apollo 13," unleash the kind of applause and unrestrained cheering one would more expect from prisoners sprung free after years of captivity. "Here comes the sun!" "Off with the jackets." "Turn the heat on!" "Yeah! We're going back to movie-making!"
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | LYNN SMITH, Lynn Smith is a staff writer for the Times' Life & Style section
Teen-agers who like to see the underdog come out on top like this movie, some crying and sniffing along with the adults in this poignant role for Tom Hanks. "I thought it was cool to see a guy who supposedly is sub-ordinary become extraordinary," said Peter Goff, 13. "Everybody thought lesser of him, but he became better than them."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
On networks with historical bents, there is always a fair amount of Lincoln-mania this time of year - PBS' "American Experience" just repeated its excellent miniseries "Abraham and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided," - and what with Steven Spielberg's big screen "Lincoln" steadily amassing statuary, it's safe to say, things have reached a fever pitch, putting us well into the counterintuitive stage, i.e., let's have a look at the other guy. "Killing Lincoln,"...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013 | By Patrick Pacheco
- George C. Wolfe is flummoxed. He's describing the gestation of "Lucky Guy," the Nora Ephron play he is directing with Tom Hanks playing an ambitious and cocky New York newspaper reporter. It began, he says, with Ephron asking him: "What's more fun than hanging out with the boys in the bar?" It ended, nine months later, with a phone call from her agent saying she had died. "I didn't even know that Nora was sick until the actual day she died," he says, sitting in a Midtown Manhattan coffee shop on a rainy spring afternoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1993 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Director Steven Spielberg's "Schindler's List" and New Zealand director Jane Campion's "The Piano," both widely lauded by film critics, led the 51st annual Golden Globe Awards nominations announced Wednesday. Each film is nominated in six categories.
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