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Tom Sherak

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
After the death Tuesday of L.A. film czar Tom Sherak, his deputy, Rajiv Dalal, the last executive to work with him, shared his thoughts on his passing: We grew very close in his waning months, and I feel that there is one story still to be told -- how Tom dedicated the last three months of his life to help the people of Los Angeles. When first we met, Tom was in the early stages of recuperating from what was hoped to be his last chemotherapy treatment.  And while he likely needed more time for recovery, Tom recognized the urgency of being the mayor's newly appointed film czar and charged forth to begin stemming runaway production.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Building "a people mover" to serve Los Angeles International Airport, providing more incentives to help the local film industry thrive and bidding for the 2024 Olympics were among the priorities outlined by Mayor Eric Garcetti during a Sunday morning talk show.  Garcetti acknowledged that these and other priorities, such as water conservation and protecting the environment, pose major challenges but said he is undaunted. "Am I swinging for the fences?" Garcetti said during the KABC-TV Channel 7 interview.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By John Horn
Many years ago, a longtime friend started working at 20th Century Fox. In one of his first meetings in his new job, he was introduced to Tom Sherak, who at the time was senior vice president of Fox Filmed Entertainment, where he worked in marketing and distribution. “He's like the mayor of Hollywood,” the friend said of the gregarious executive. PHOTOS: Highest-paid media executives of 2012 Nearly two decades later, Sherak more or less has become that person.
OPINION
January 30, 2014
Re "Former head of movie academy," Obituary, Jan. 29 You say that Tom Sherak was "best known for the jobs he did for free" and for his long career as a studio executive. What he also did "for free" for about 20 years, after he learned that one of his daughters had multiple sclerosis, was work tirelessly for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. He saw research as so important that he brought together and funded many of the leaders in that field, including those at UCLA. But he also ensured that much of the many millions of dollars he was able to raise was used where needed to ease the lives of patients.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
The death of Tom Sherak, the respected Hollywood executive and recently appointed film czar for Los Angeles, is a blow to the city's film industry. Sherak, the former president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, died Tuesday at his home in Calabasas after suffering a long bout with prostate cancer. His passing comes only four months after he was tapped by Mayor Eric Garcetti to lead his efforts to support the local film industry, which has been buffeted by the exodus of film and TV production to other states and countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti has appointed veteran Hollywood executive Tom Sherak to be his senior film advisor. Sherak, the former president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, will lead Garcetti's efforts to support the local entertainment industry and increase local production, the mayor said in a statement. “The entertainment industry generates more than 500,000 local jobs. Protecting and expanding it is an absolute necessity,” Garcetti said. “Tom will lead our campaign for production incentives in Sacramento and is empowered to work across city departments to make L.A. the best possible location for production.” PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments Sherak, who will also serve as the director of the Mayor's Entertainment Industry and Production Office, will earn a salary of $1 per year.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
The passing of a Hollywood executive is often greeted with pleasant industry remembrances and kind emails. But the death of Tom Sherak at the age of 68 set off a round of intensely warm reactions not just from fellow Hollywood players but also from personalities as wide-ranging as Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and Dodgers general manager Ned Colletti. Their depth of feeling and the breadth of people expressing them underscore a legacy that goes well beyond movies. Sherak, who died Tuesday at his home in Calabasas after a fierce battle with prostate cancer, served as a long-running executive at 20th Century Fox and then Revolution Studios, as an advisor to Marvel Studios and as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Veteran Hollywood executive Tom Sherak has a new role: Los Angeles film czar. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti on Thursday appointed Sherak to be his senior film advisor and help stem the flow of production that has taken a toll on the city's signature film and television business. Sherak, the former president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, will lead Garcetti's efforts to make L.A. more film friendly and persuade state lawmakers to do more to support the state's entertainment industry, the mayor said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2014 | By David Colker
Tom Sherak had a long career as a studio executive and was involved in hundreds of films, including "Black Hawk Down," "Mrs. Doubtfire" and "Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace. " But Sherak is best known for the jobs he did for free or almost free. For three years ending in 2012, he was outspoken president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, , during which he launched initiatives but also had to deal with public controversies, including the replacement of the producer and host of an Oscar show.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2000 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tom Sherak, chairman of 20th Century Fox's Domestic Film Group, is leaving the studio after 17 years to become an equity partner in former Disney Chairman Joe Roth's new venture, Revolution Studios. Sherak was responsible for the roll-out of such high-profile films as "Titanic," "Die Hard," "Alien," "There's Something About Mary" and "Wall Street," among others. This move has been the subject of rumors ever since Roth announced his Santa Monica-based independent film company in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before lobbying for later start times for earnings calls. The Skinny: I had to get up at 4:40 a.m. today to listen to Time Warner Cable's earnings call. How about some consideration for the West Coast when scheduling these things? Forgive the typos. I'm groggy. Today's report includes the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences taking away an Oscar nomination, and Gail Berman ending her production partnership with Lloyd Braun. Also, industry big shots remember movie executive Tom Sherak, who died earlier this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
After the death Tuesday of L.A. film czar Tom Sherak, his deputy, Rajiv Dalal, the last executive to work with him, shared his thoughts on his passing: We grew very close in his waning months, and I feel that there is one story still to be told -- how Tom dedicated the last three months of his life to help the people of Los Angeles. When first we met, Tom was in the early stages of recuperating from what was hoped to be his last chemotherapy treatment.  And while he likely needed more time for recovery, Tom recognized the urgency of being the mayor's newly appointed film czar and charged forth to begin stemming runaway production.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Mayor Eric Garcetti said he was deeply saddened Tuesday over the death of his friend and newly-appointed film czar Tom Sherak. "Everybody feels a strong sense of loss," Garcetti said in an interview. "He was a public servant long before he became a film czar. " In an emotional interview Tuesday evening, Garcetti said he was still coming to grips with Sherak's death after a long bout with cancer. PHOTOS: Tom Sherak's life in the Academy Garcetti picked Sherak to volunteer his services as director of the city's  film office last September, hoping his years as a seasoned Hollywood executive and skills as a consensus-builder would help him serve as a champion for the local film industry.  At the time, Sherak openly acknowledged that he was receiving chemotherapy for prostate cancer, but he was confident his health problems were behind him, a confidence shared by the mayor and many of Sherak's colleagues.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
The passing of a Hollywood executive is often greeted with pleasant industry remembrances and kind emails. But the death of Tom Sherak at the age of 68 set off a round of intensely warm reactions not just from fellow Hollywood players but also from personalities as wide-ranging as Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and Dodgers general manager Ned Colletti. Their depth of feeling and the breadth of people expressing them underscore a legacy that goes well beyond movies. Sherak, who died Tuesday at his home in Calabasas after a fierce battle with prostate cancer, served as a long-running executive at 20th Century Fox and then Revolution Studios, as an advisor to Marvel Studios and as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
The death of Tom Sherak, the respected Hollywood executive and recently appointed film czar for Los Angeles, is a blow to the city's film industry. Sherak, the former president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, died Tuesday at his home in Calabasas after suffering a long bout with prostate cancer. His passing comes only four months after he was tapped by Mayor Eric Garcetti to lead his efforts to support the local film industry, which has been buffeted by the exodus of film and TV production to other states and countries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2014 | By David Colker
Tom Sherak had a long career as a studio executive and was involved in hundreds of films, including "Black Hawk Down," "Mrs. Doubtfire" and "Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace. " But Sherak is best known for the jobs he did for free or almost free. For three years ending in 2012, he was outspoken president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, , during which he launched initiatives but also had to deal with public controversies, including the replacement of the producer and host of an Oscar show.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2009 | Rachel Abramowitz
Tom Sherak never forgets that movies are for the masses. The veteran marketer turned new president of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences started in showbiz driving around states like Maryland and West Virginia, persuading ordinary people to book such Paramount movies as "The Godfather" and "Love Story" into their small-town movie houses. "They were all real people, postal workers or sanitation workers who also owned the one theater in town. I'd go and meet them at their lunch hour and tell them about the movies."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times, This post has been corrected. See note below for details
Tom Sherak never would have been elected president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences if it weren't for the late Frank Pierson and a verbal spat that almost turned physical. It was early 2009, and Pierson and Sherak were at loggerheads at a Board of Governors meeting over a financing issue. The talk was getting contentious, so much so that Sherak said he thought the octogenarian screenwriter "could have beaten the crap out of me. " Then-academy President Sid Ganis threw the discussion to committee to avoid more arguing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2014 | By Michael Finnegan
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti was planning to take off for Utah on Friday for a weekend at the Sundance Film Festival. Garcetti described his visit to the Park City ski resort as part personal, part business. Taxpayers won't be billed, he said, because he's spending a day with friends. “It's on my own dime,” Garcetti said in an interview at Cal State Northridge after an event marking the 20th anniversary of the earthquake. Garcetti said he was also planning to attend a reception for Los Angeles filmmakers at a private home.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Hollywood stakeholders are calling on California to bolster its film and TV tax credit to keep its homegrown industry from permanently leaving the state. Film industry and union officials are mobilizing to back legislation this year that would substantially increase funding for the state's film incentive program and lift some restrictions to make the program more competitive with those offered by New York, Georgia and other states and countries. "The bottom line is, these countries and these states realize what production means to them, and we have to show them [lawmakers]
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