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Tom Soto

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2003 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
The son of a state senator billed water agencies and cities thousands of dollars last year for work that included writing speeches, organizing Senate hearings and arranging "photo opportunities" for his lawmaker mother. Tom Soto, president of the Santa Monica public relations firm PS Enterprises and son of state Sen. Nell Soto (D-Pomona), was hired by two San Bernardino County cities and two water districts in June 2002 after Sen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Paul Pringle
Opposition is mounting to a plan to take money-making parking spaces away from the California Science Center and give them to USC as part of a deal to have the private school operate the taxpayer-owned Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. The Science Center's fundraising foundation and Sen. Curren D. Price (D-South Los Angeles) have joined the ranks of critics who say the parking plan would damage attendance and programs at the center and its Exposition Park neighbor, the California African American Museum.
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BUSINESS
November 11, 2007 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
The political business was in his blood, but Tom Soto's heart was drawn to protecting California's natural beauty. So he has made his living melding the two. Soto, the son of Assemblywoman and former state Sen. Nell Soto (D-Pomona) and the late state Sen. Phil Soto, has spent nearly two decades jumping among political appointments, business ventures and antipollution causes.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2007 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
The political business was in his blood, but Tom Soto's heart was drawn to protecting California's natural beauty. So he has made his living melding the two. Soto, the son of Assemblywoman and former state Sen. Nell Soto (D-Pomona) and the late state Sen. Phil Soto, has spent nearly two decades jumping among political appointments, business ventures and antipollution causes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1990
Tom Soto's thoughtful article, "Ecological Issues Come in All Colors" (Commentary, Oct. 8), articulated a vital but little understood fact: that environmental matters are not exclusively the domain of the wealthy or of backpackers. While minorities have not been joiners of traditional environmental organizations, our environmentalism is personal and cultural. Our cultures value nature and respect the land. We are taught to venerate our elders, whether it's our grandparents or ancient trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1989
The Times article regarding the City Council's decision to delete the Office of Air Quality from my proposed 1989-90 budget and set aside the funds for creation of a Department of Environmental Quality grossly misrepresented my position on this matter (Metro, May 16). I do not "strongly oppose" creation of an Environmental Quality Department. What I did oppose was the idea of delaying implementation of the Air Quality Office by diverting the funds I set aside for this purpose. Realistically, it is likely to take six months, perhaps a year, before the Department of Environmental Quality can begin operation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Paul Pringle
Opposition is mounting to a plan to take money-making parking spaces away from the California Science Center and give them to USC as part of a deal to have the private school operate the taxpayer-owned Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. The Science Center's fundraising foundation and Sen. Curren D. Price (D-South Los Angeles) have joined the ranks of critics who say the parking plan would damage attendance and programs at the center and its Exposition Park neighbor, the California African American Museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1993 | TOM SOTO, Tom Soto of Santa Monica is president of the Coalition for Clean Air.
This Earth Day, as on the first, the roster of the nation's worst hazardous waste sites is also a canticle of places that house the nation's poorest people of color: Warren County, N.C.; Talequah, Okla.; West Harlem, N.Y.; Brownsville, Tex.; Southeast Chicago, Ill.; East Los Angeles. Only the names change; the residents' faces stay the same.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1992
Mary Nichols and Tom Soto attack the smog emissions market proposed by the AQMD as costly and uneconomical ("Smog Trade-Offs: Devil Is in Details," Commentary, March 12). In truth , they are simply blinded by love for the current system of rigid air quality regulations. According to Nichols and Soto, market-based programs encourage fraud because they lack strict controls. The free market is too free. The development of an emissions market to replace the current system will allow the very flexibility needed to achieve our emission-reduction goals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2000 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmentalists are calling the state Coastal Commission's unanimous approval of a scaled-down development at Bolsa Chica marsh a victory of grass-roots activism over politics. "It was like a Frank Capra movie, 'Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,' " said Marinka Horack of Huntington Beach, a Bolsa Chica Land Trust member. The land trust would like to buy the acreage and preserve it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2003 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
The son of a state senator billed water agencies and cities thousands of dollars last year for work that included writing speeches, organizing Senate hearings and arranging "photo opportunities" for his lawmaker mother. Tom Soto, president of the Santa Monica public relations firm PS Enterprises and son of state Sen. Nell Soto (D-Pomona), was hired by two San Bernardino County cities and two water districts in June 2002 after Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1993 | TOM SOTO, Tom Soto of Santa Monica is president of the Coalition for Clean Air.
This Earth Day, as on the first, the roster of the nation's worst hazardous waste sites is also a canticle of places that house the nation's poorest people of color: Warren County, N.C.; Talequah, Okla.; West Harlem, N.Y.; Brownsville, Tex.; Southeast Chicago, Ill.; East Los Angeles. Only the names change; the residents' faces stay the same.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1990
Tom Soto's thoughtful article, "Ecological Issues Come in All Colors" (Commentary, Oct. 8), articulated a vital but little understood fact: that environmental matters are not exclusively the domain of the wealthy or of backpackers. While minorities have not been joiners of traditional environmental organizations, our environmentalism is personal and cultural. Our cultures value nature and respect the land. We are taught to venerate our elders, whether it's our grandparents or ancient trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1989
The Times article regarding the City Council's decision to delete the Office of Air Quality from my proposed 1989-90 budget and set aside the funds for creation of a Department of Environmental Quality grossly misrepresented my position on this matter (Metro, May 16). I do not "strongly oppose" creation of an Environmental Quality Department. What I did oppose was the idea of delaying implementation of the Air Quality Office by diverting the funds I set aside for this purpose. Realistically, it is likely to take six months, perhaps a year, before the Department of Environmental Quality can begin operation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1988 | From United Press International
Shoppers at a Ralph's supermarket in West Los Angeles were greeted Saturday for the second day by protesters who sought to discourage them from buying table grapes in support of a fast by United Farm Workers leader Cesar Chavez. About 15 protesters gathered outside the Wilshire Boulevard market, chanting, "Boycott grapes," while a half dozen members of another group wound up a 24-hour sit-in in the store's produce section.
OPINION
July 13, 1997
"MTA Probes Charities Promoted by Alatorre" (July 7) is a despicable example of power usurpation and nonprofit mismanagement. Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre and his wife Angie contend no wrongdoing, yet numerous examples prove the contrary. Eventfully Yours [an event-planning firm] operated without a license and continued doing so even after receiving a letter stating the expiration date of the extended license. Angie Alatorre drew a $36,000 annual salary for "part-time" work.
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