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Tomiichi Murayama

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BUSINESS
June 30, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Socialist party leader Tomiichi Murayama's election Wednesday as Japanese prime minister places new strains on U.S.-Japan trade relations and may derail Tokyo's efforts to carry out economic reforms.
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NEWS
January 17, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tomiichi Murayama, who abruptly resigned as Japan's prime minister last week, overwhelmingly won reelection as Socialist Party chairman Tuesday to face the daunting task of averting his party's annihilation in national elections later this year. Murayama trounced Tadatoshi Akiba, a U.S.-trained mathematician and liberal challenger in what was billed as a battle for the party's soul.
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NEWS
July 1, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's this? A party at the helm of Japan controlling only 14% of the seats in the lower house of Parliament? Radical left-wingers supporting a coalition with the old conservative stalwarts? Or, most unlikely of all, a Cabinet in which three potential prime ministers hold down the most important posts under a Socialist?
NEWS
January 6, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama, who triggered a political furor by abruptly resigning along with his Cabinet, said Friday that he did his best in a 555-day tenure plagued by disasters and crises.
NEWS
June 30, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's wild politics took a stunning turn Wednesday as Socialist Tomiichi Murayama withstood the vigorous opposition of two former prime ministers and won this nation's top job--with the support of his party's archenemies. Murayama's election as prime minister--he is the first Socialist to hold the position since the postwar poverty and confusion of 1947--sent shocks through the Japanese business world and was expected to raise alarm in Washington as well.
NEWS
June 1, 1995 | Associated Press
Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama indirectly threatened Wednesday to quit if hawks in his coalition block a resolution to apologize for Japan's World War II atrocities. Murayama appeared to raise the stakes in the battle over the resolution, which has come to occupy center stage as Japan considers how to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the war's end.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1996 | From Reuters
Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama said in a New Year's message issued today that he is convinced that the nation's economy will start recovering in 1996 after four years of recession. "We will make utmost efforts to achieve full-fledged economic recovery in 1996," Murayama said.
NEWS
November 22, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After waiting fruitlessly for two months for a recalcitrant governor to cooperate, Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama on Tuesday launched a legal process to compel landowners to renew leases on their property in Okinawa for use as American military bases. The action appeared to ensure the continued legality of U.S. use of the land. But it did nothing to placate Gov. Masahide Ota, who has used the Sept. 4 rape of a 12-year-old Okinawa girl, in which three U.S.
NEWS
September 12, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama's ruling coalition suffered an unexpectedly severe defeat in the first Parliament-level test of its support Sunday as an opposition candidate won by a landslide in a by-election for a seat in the upper house. Yuzuru Tsuzuki, 43, a former Labor Ministry section chief who was backed by six opposition parties, won 43% of the ballots cast for seven candidates in Aichi prefecture. Ruling coalition candidate Jiro Mizuno, 48, a former U.N.
NEWS
September 4, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama won approval Saturday for a historic reversal of his Socialist Party's pacifist policies, but the victory dealt a severe blow to party unity. A special party convention backed Murayama's declarations supporting the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty, recognizing Japan's armed forces as constitutional, accepting nuclear power generation and acknowledging the national anthem and national flag.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama abruptly resigned the nation's top post today, throwing the political world into uproar amid predictions of another major realignment. Murayama, who has long indicated his desire to resign, was cornered into the decision by today's deadline for entering his Socialist Party's presidential race. After his announcement, his entire Cabinet resigned.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1996 | From Reuters
Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama said in a New Year's message issued today that he is convinced that the nation's economy will start recovering in 1996 after four years of recession. "We will make utmost efforts to achieve full-fledged economic recovery in 1996," Murayama said.
NEWS
November 22, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After waiting fruitlessly for two months for a recalcitrant governor to cooperate, Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama on Tuesday launched a legal process to compel landowners to renew leases on their property in Okinawa for use as American military bases. The action appeared to ensure the continued legality of U.S. use of the land. But it did nothing to placate Gov. Masahide Ota, who has used the Sept. 4 rape of a 12-year-old Okinawa girl, in which three U.S.
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | From Reuters
Asian nations welcomed Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama's apology Tuesday for World War II actions, but some governments, veterans and victims of Japan's aggression demanded more to ease their painful memories. Murayama's apology, issued on the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II, followed a parliamentary resolution in July that expressed only "deep reflection."
NEWS
July 25, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As business people here fired a barrage of criticism at the government, Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama and his coalition partners today failed to agree on whether they will form a new Cabinet to try to energize an administration supported by only 20% of Japanese voters. Whether to name new ministers will be decided after Aug. 4, when the current Cabinet fixes a ceiling for requests for next year's budget, Chief Cabinet Secretary Kozo Igarashi said.
NEWS
July 24, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama early today offered to resign but then changed his mind, after Japanese voters pushed to the forefront a new opposition conservative party and handed his own Socialists and his left-right coalition a severe blow in an upper house election Sunday, the 71-year-old leader said this morning. Murayama acknowledged his momentary misgivings after formally declaring that he and his two coalition partners had agreed to continue their alliance under his leadership.
NEWS
January 17, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tomiichi Murayama, who abruptly resigned as Japan's prime minister last week, overwhelmingly won reelection as Socialist Party chairman Tuesday to face the daunting task of averting his party's annihilation in national elections later this year. Murayama trounced Tadatoshi Akiba, a U.S.-trained mathematician and liberal challenger in what was billed as a battle for the party's soul.
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | From Reuters
Asian nations welcomed Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama's apology Tuesday for World War II actions, but some governments, veterans and victims of Japan's aggression demanded more to ease their painful memories. Murayama's apology, issued on the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II, followed a parliamentary resolution in July that expressed only "deep reflection."
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like two drivers hurtling toward each other in a contest of "chicken," President Clinton and Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama eyed each other warily Thursday but kept their nations on course for a monumental trade collision. With the United States and Japan racing toward a June 28 deadline imposed by Clinton for reaching an agreement to open the Japanese market to U.S.-built automobiles and auto parts, the two leaders made no apparent progress toward easing their dispute.
NEWS
June 1, 1995 | Associated Press
Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama indirectly threatened Wednesday to quit if hawks in his coalition block a resolution to apologize for Japan's World War II atrocities. Murayama appeared to raise the stakes in the battle over the resolution, which has come to occupy center stage as Japan considers how to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the war's end.
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