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Tomio Yamamoto

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BUSINESS
June 22, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's agriculture minister said Thursday that he is prepared to resign, if necessary, rather than lift his country's ban on rice imports as part of a round of multilateral trade negotiations that end in December. Speaking at the Japan National Press Club, Tomio Yamamoto also rejected an American demand that Japan end its subsidies to farmers. He said he is "resolved to assume responsibility" if agricultural negotiations in the so-called Uruguay Round of trade talks "fail to go smoothly."
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BUSINESS
June 22, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's agriculture minister said Thursday that he is prepared to resign, if necessary, rather than lift his country's ban on rice imports as part of a round of multilateral trade negotiations that end in December. Speaking at the Japan National Press Club, Tomio Yamamoto also rejected an American demand that Japan end its subsidies to farmers. He said he is "resolved to assume responsibility" if agricultural negotiations in the so-called Uruguay Round of trade talks "fail to go smoothly."
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BUSINESS
July 6, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Japanese Cabinet decided today to cut by 1.5% the rice price paid to farmers for the 1990 crop from 1989 levels, Agriculture Minister Tomio Yamamoto told reporters. Japan faces mounting international criticism for its refusal to end a ban on all commercial imports of rice, which it has said is needed to protect local farmers from cheap imports and to ensure self-sufficiency in Japan's staple food.
NEWS
May 21, 1990 | From United Press International
Agriculture Secretary Clayton K. Yeutter said today that Japan is acting inconsistently and unfairly if it truly expects to exempt its rice policy from world trade reform efforts. "We just cannot conduct international trade policy in this manner," Yeutter said in a sternly worded letter to Japanese Agriculture Minister Tomio Yamamoto. Yeutter said he is troubled by published remarks in which Yamamoto accused the United States of meddling in Japanese affairs.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu said today that Japan will maintain a ban on rice imports to protect domestic growers despite U.S. demands for improved market access. "Rice and rice cultivation have a special significance for our country and in light of this we will continue to adhere to the basic policy of self-sufficiency," Kaifu told legislators in an upper house session. Trade Representative Carla Anderson Hills recently called on Japan to gradually open up its rice market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1990
On the testy issue of international trade in rice, the Japanese people are far ahead of their government. Consumers want cheaper rice. This means opening up their market to imported rice. But Tokyo keeps insisting that they pay two to three times more for their rice than shoppers around the world. It has long characterized rice as the cultural core of the country. The Japanese rice manifesto, long held, bans virtually all imports of the grain.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1990 | From Associated Press
U.S. Agriculture Secretary Clayton K. Yeutter today gave his Japanese counterpart two bags of California rice and expressed optimism that Japan will act this year to end its ban on imports of the grain. Japan's refusal to open its rice market is one of the stickiest trade disputes between the two economic superpowers, and Yeutter received no promises today.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1990 | From Reuters
The Japanese Cabinet decided Friday to cut by 1.5% the price the government will pay farmers for the 1990 rice crop, Agriculture Minister Tomio Yamamoto said. Japan faces mounting international criticism for its refusal to end a ban on commercial imports of rice, which it has said is needed to protect farmers from cheap imports and to ensure self-sufficiency in Japan's staple food. The reduction, to an average of 83 cents a pound, was recommended by a ministry panel on Wednesday.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan on Monday again rebuffed a plea that it remove its ban on rice imports, but Agriculture Secretary Clayton K. Yeutter predicted that it would agree to do so before year-end. "Rice may be an item of interest to the United States, but it is a matter of life and death to Japan," Agriculture Minister Tomio Yamamoto told Yeutter, ruling out even partial liberalization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1990
The Japanese insistence that rice is the symbol of their nation's heart and soul has made the grain a staple not only of the nation's tables, but also of its contentious trade relations. Tokyo's refusal to lift a controversial ban on rice imports poses a major obstacle to winding up current multilateral trade talks. The United States wants the ban abandoned by the end of the year. Japanese Agriculture Minister Tomio Yamamoto says he's prepared to resign rather than liberalize rice imports.
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