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SPORTS
April 20, 1989
Three former University of South Carolina assistant football coaches were indicted by a South Carolina grand jury Wednesday for allegedly providing athletes with anabolic steroids, and a fourth was charged with importing the muscle-building drugs into the state. James W. Washburn, Thomas E. Gadd and Thomas Kurucz were charged with conspiring to conduct a program of illegal steroid use, according to the indictment. The coaches allegedly encouraged and monitored the progress of the athletes using steroids, the indictment said.
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SPORTS
April 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
Four former South Carolina assistant football coaches were indicted today following an investigation into the alleged illegal use and distribution of "thousands of dollars" worth of anabolic steroids at the university. Thomas E. Gadd, James W. Washburn and Thomas Kurucz were charged with conspiring to "conduct a program of illegal steroid use by members of the athletic community and particularly by the university's football team." The grand jury also charged the three with importing steroids into South Carolina and distributing them without prescription.
SPORTS
April 20, 1989
Three former University of South Carolina assistant football coaches were indicted by a South Carolina grand jury Wednesday for allegedly providing athletes with anabolic steroids, and a fourth was charged with importing the muscle-building drugs into the state. James W. Washburn, Thomas E. Gadd and Thomas Kurucz were charged with conspiring to conduct a program of illegal steroid use, according to the indictment. The coaches allegedly encouraged and monitored the progress of the athletes using steroids, the indictment said.
SPORTS
April 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
Four former South Carolina assistant football coaches were indicted today following an investigation into the alleged illegal use and distribution of "thousands of dollars" worth of anabolic steroids at the university. Thomas E. Gadd, James W. Washburn and Thomas Kurucz were charged with conspiring to "conduct a program of illegal steroid use by members of the athletic community and particularly by the university's football team." The grand jury also charged the three with importing steroids into South Carolina and distributing them without prescription.
SPORTS
March 27, 1989 | SALLY JENKINS, W ashington Post
Tommy Chaikin no longer seeks to alter his person by artificial means. In retrospect, he views his experiment with steroids as the height of stupidity. He gained 50 pounds of muscle, became a starting defensive end for South Carolina, and ended up in a state of mental and physical collapse and legal controversy. He says he knows now what a self-obsessed act of gall it was, to attempt to redefine his essential matter and muscle. "I was an arrogant . . .," he said.
SPORTS
June 20, 1989
Tom Gadd, former South Carolina assistant football coach, went on trial in Columbia, S.C., on charges that he conspired to distribute steroids to athletes at the school. Gadd, an assistant at South Carolina from 1982 to 1986, was charged with conspiring to conduct a "program of prohibited steroid use by members of the South Carolina athletic community and particularly its football team." In a related trial, John L. Carter of Bethesda, Md., pleaded guilty in federal court to giving steroids to former Gamecock football player Tommy Chaikin.
SPORTS
August 10, 1989 | From Associated Press
Three former South Carolina football coaches were sentenced today to terms ranging from three months to six months in a halfway house for their convictions stemming from the use and distribution of steroids in the athletic department. U.S. District Judge G. Ross Anderson also sentenced a Maryland man convicted of similar charges to a three-month term at a community security facility.
SPORTS
March 27, 1989 | SALLY JENKINS, W ashington Post
Tommy Chaikin no longer seeks to alter his person by artificial means. In retrospect, he views his experiment with steroids as the height of stupidity. He gained 50 pounds of muscle, became a starting defensive end for South Carolina, and ended up in a state of mental and physical collapse and legal controversy. He says he knows now what a self-obsessed act of gall it was, to attempt to redefine his essential matter and muscle. "I was an arrogant . . .," he said.
SPORTS
May 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
Four former South Carolina football coaches were arraigned today on charges stemming from a probe of alleged steroid use at the university and illegal distribution of the drug statewide. The four men, who were indicted April 19 by a federal grand jury, pleaded innocent to the charges. U.S. Magistrate Charles Gambrell granted $10,000 unsecured bond each and said the men, none of whom live in South Carolina, will be allowed to leave the state. Former Gamecocks coaches Jim Washburn, Tom Gadd and Tom Kurucz were indicted by the grand jury for "conspiring to conduct a program of illegal steroid use by members of the athletic community . . . particularly by members of the university's football team."
SPORTS
July 26, 1990 | From Associated Press
South Carolina's football program escaped sanctions today as the NCAA announced it found no serious rule violations resulting from a steroid scandal which led to prison terms for three former assistant coaches. However, the NCAA extended by six months the two-year probation for the men's basketball program, which began in 1987 and was to have ended in 1989.The probation was the result of a scheme in which athletes sold complimentary tickets to boosters.
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