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SPORTS
February 2, 1990
Tommy Gioiosa began serving a five-year prison sentence Thursday for transporting cocaine and claiming Pete Rose's race track winnings, and he reiterated one of the most serious accusations against the former manager of the Cincinnati Reds. Gioiosa, who lived with Rose for five years, said in a broadcast interview that he had been present when Rose bet on baseball games, including those of the Reds.
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SPORTS
February 2, 1990
Tommy Gioiosa began serving a five-year prison sentence Thursday for transporting cocaine and claiming Pete Rose's race track winnings, and he reiterated one of the most serious accusations against the former manager of the Cincinnati Reds. Gioiosa, who lived with Rose for five years, said in a broadcast interview that he had been present when Rose bet on baseball games, including those of the Reds.
SPORTS
June 27, 1989
Excerpts from the report on Pete Rose submitted to the commissioner of baseball May 9 by investigator John Dowd. The report was made public Monday. INTRODUCTION . . . Pete Rose has denied under oath ever betting on major league baseball or associating with anyone who bet on major league baseball. However, the investigation has developed evidence to the contrary. The testimony and the documentary evidence gathered in the course of the investigation demonstrates that Pete Rose bet on baseball, and in particular, on games of the Cincinnati Reds baseball club, during the 1985, 1986, and 1987 seasons.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
A special investigator's report to major league baseball on Pete Rose's alleged gambling, made public Monday by a Cincinnati judge, accuses the Cincinnati Reds' manager of betting not only on major league games but on his own team's games as well, from 1985 to 1987. Lawyers for Rose won a temporary restraining order Sunday, preventing baseball from conducting a hearing with Rose--one was scheduled for today--until at least July 6. But the Ohio Supreme Court, responding to a suit filed Monday by the Cleveland Plain Dealer, ordered Judge Norbert A. Nadel of Hamilton County Common Pleas Court to release the report or explain why. Nadel, the same judge who Sunday had issued the temporary restraining order, complied reluctantly with the court's order.
SPORTS
June 27, 1989
Excerpts from the report on Pete Rose submitted to the commissioner of baseball May 9 by investigator John Dowd. The report was made public Monday. INTRODUCTION . . . Pete Rose has denied under oath ever betting on major league baseball or associating with anyone who bet on major league baseball. However, the investigation has developed evidence to the contrary. The testimony and the documentary evidence gathered in the course of the investigation demonstrates that Pete Rose bet on baseball, and in particular, on games of the Cincinnati Reds baseball club, during the 1985, 1986, and 1987 seasons.
SPORTS
August 8, 2001 | Bill Plaschke
It used to be the nickname of a superstar. Now it is the dance of the doomed. The Charlie Hustle. I'm sick of watching it. Sick of brushing up against it. Sick of stepping around the goop that falls from it. Pete Rose was perhaps the greatest hitter in baseball history. But he is becoming perhaps the biggest blemish. Twelve years ago, Rose was banned from baseball for misconduct relating to gambling.
SPORTS
March 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
Pete Rose won a big bet on the 1988 Super Bowl and bought a Porsche the day after winning a lot of money at baccarat, according to a longtime friend. Tommy Gioiosa also said he placed bets for Rose at race tracks. Rose didn't like to go the betting windows in person because he would be bothered by fans, Gioiosa said. "Pete liked to go to the track." he told the Boston Sunday Globe. "He would bet $2,000 or $4,000 or $8,000, maybe between $4,000 and $10,000, but Pete was good at it.
SPORTS
January 7, 2004 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
Former Dodger manager Tom Lasorda heatedly denied an accusation that he'd regularly spoken with Pete Rose during Rose's managerial career with the Cincinnati Reds, unwittingly providing information that Rose used to bet on major league baseball games. "That's a lie," Lasorda said Tuesday. In his forthcoming book, "My Prison Without Bars," Rose recants his stance that he never wagered on baseball but insists he never bet against the Reds and never placed bets from the clubhouse.
SPORTS
August 19, 2001 | DAVE KINDRED, Dave Kindred writes for the Sporting News
One evening with nothing better to do, the television carried pictures of the intrepid reporter Geraldo Rivera conducting an excavation. He was in a basement in Chicago, if memory serves, and the idea was to reveal the contents of Al Capone's secret vault. For two hours--it came to feel like two days--Rivera informed his increasingly stupefied audience of the treasures Capone might have buried during his reign as a gangland king. Finally, we made it inside the vault. And there it was.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
A special investigator's report to major league baseball on Pete Rose's alleged gambling, made public Monday by a Cincinnati judge, accuses the Cincinnati Reds' manager of betting not only on major league games but on his own team's games as well, from 1985 to 1987. Lawyers for Rose won a temporary restraining order Sunday, preventing baseball from conducting a hearing with Rose--one was scheduled for today--until at least July 6. But the Ohio Supreme Court, responding to a suit filed Monday by the Cleveland Plain Dealer, ordered Judge Norbert A. Nadel of Hamilton County Common Pleas Court to release the report or explain why. Nadel, the same judge who Sunday had issued the temporary restraining order, complied reluctantly with the court's order.
SPORTS
March 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Pete Rose won a big bet on the 1988 Super Bowl and bought a Porsche the day after winning a lot of money at baccarat, according to a longtime friend of the Cincinnati Reds manager. Tommy Gioiosa also said he placed bets for Rose at race tracks. Baseball's all-time hits leader didn't like to go to the betting windows in person because he would be bothered by fans, Gioiosa said. "Pete liked to go to the track," he told the Boston Sunday Globe.
SPORTS
April 20, 1990 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pete Rose, the former Cincinnati Red manager who was banned from baseball for life last year because of alleged gambling violations, will plead guilty today to filing false tax returns and could be sentenced to six years in prison and fined $500,000. Documents unsealed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Cincinnati showed that Rose has agreed to plead guilty to two counts of filing false tax returns by failing to report income from memorabilia sales, autograph signings and personal appearances.
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