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Tommy Zbikowski

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SPORTS
March 11, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Leverage is everything, and for Baltimore Ravens safety Tommy Zbikowski, that means boxing for a living should the NFL season not happen. The 25-year-old former Notre Dame star is preparing to earn $10,000 for no more than 12 minutes of work Saturday night. With a restricted free-agent tender deal from the Ravens on the table, Zbikowski will return to the pro boxing ring at MGM Grand in Las Vegas against 35-year-old Richard Bryant in a four-round heavyweight fight. Zbikowski is back in the ring after a five-year hiatus, necessitated by his NFL preparation.
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SPORTS
March 12, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Reporting from Las Vegas Football's loss may be boxing's gain. With the NFL in labor limbo, Baltimore Ravens safety Tommy Zbikowski returned to pro boxing Saturday and produced a first-round technical knockout over a flabbier foe, Richard Bryant. The 25-year-old Zbikowski pounded a left hook to Bryant's belly, and the 235-pound man lost his breath and slumped to the canvas. Bryant was so out of wind that referee Russell Mora stopped the fight at the 1:45 mark of the first round.
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SPORTS
March 12, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Reporting from Las Vegas Football's loss may be boxing's gain. With the NFL in labor limbo, Baltimore Ravens safety Tommy Zbikowski returned to pro boxing Saturday and produced a first-round technical knockout over a flabbier foe, Richard Bryant. The 25-year-old Zbikowski pounded a left hook to Bryant's belly, and the 235-pound man lost his breath and slumped to the canvas. Bryant was so out of wind that referee Russell Mora stopped the fight at the 1:45 mark of the first round.
SPORTS
March 11, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Leverage is everything, and for Baltimore Ravens safety Tommy Zbikowski, that means boxing for a living should the NFL season not happen. The 25-year-old former Notre Dame star is preparing to earn $10,000 for no more than 12 minutes of work Saturday night. With a restricted free-agent tender deal from the Ravens on the table, Zbikowski will return to the pro boxing ring at MGM Grand in Las Vegas against 35-year-old Richard Bryant in a four-round heavyweight fight. Zbikowski is back in the ring after a five-year hiatus, necessitated by his NFL preparation.
SPORTS
March 11, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Miguel Cotto understands the value of redemption, and to get there requires a successful title defense Saturday night against Nicaraguan madman Ricardo Mayorga. Should he do the expected as an 8-to-1 Las Vegas betting favorite and keep the World Boxing Assn. super-welterweight belt in a pay-per-view bout at MGM Grand, Puerto Rico's Cotto (35-2, 28 knockouts) has agreed to make his nemesis, Antonio Margarito, his next opponent in July. "Miguel has taken some horrific beatings, but he's always retained his dignity and the thing I always talk to him about is the importance of signature fights," said Emanuel Steward, Cotto's Hall of Fame trainer.
SPORTS
June 11, 2006 | Chris Dufresne, Times Staff Writer
It was over in a New York minute -- 49 seconds. Making his professional boxing debut, with raucous teammates chanting from ringside, Notre Dame safety turned heavyweight Tommy Zbikowski did a summer job on Robert Bell of Akron, Ohio, on Saturday night, scoring a first-round technical knockout at Madison Square Garden. Referee Arthur Mercante Jr.
SPORTS
April 28, 2011 | Staff and wire reports
Big Ten Conference Commissioner Jim Delany might have acted differently toward five Ohio State football players who were allowed to play in the Sugar Bowl despite NCAA violations had he known the information that has since been uncovered. The players were permitted to wait until this fall to begin serving five-game suspensions for accepting money and tattoos from the owner of a Columbus tattoo parlor. It was not until more than a week after the Buckeyes' 31-26 victory over Arkansas that school officials realized Coach Jim Tressel had known about the violations for more than nine months.
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