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Toni Collette

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NEWS
January 6, 2010 | By Lisa Rosen
The heroine of "United States of Tara" is not your average wife and mother. Living with dissociative identity disorder (DID), Tara has four alternate identities that pop up in times of great stress, which invariably mess with her life and the lives of her family members. Fortunately for all involved, she's played by Toni Collette, who's not average at anything. (The show's executive producers, Steven Spielberg and Diablo Cody, are no slouches either.) When the Showtime series began last January, Tara had gone off her medication in the hopes of learning the source of the disorder.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
To begin talking about the new indie film "The Way, Way Back," I want to go way, way back. Praise for the movie's excellent cast, anchored by Sam Rockwell, Toni Collette, Steve Carell, Allison Janney and teenage rock Liam James, will come later. As good as the actors are, we must begin with the originality of the screenplay by Nat Faxon and Jim Rash. The writers, who also co-direct and have small roles in the film, take a fairly straightforward story of coming of age in a time of divorce, with all the frictions that arise as kids find themselves dealing with mom and dad's new loves, but they make it feel fresh.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1999 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Known for the offbeat "Muriel's Wedding" (as Muriel) and "Velvet Goldmine," Toni Collette slides toward the mainstream alongside Bruce Willis in the thriller "The Sixth Sense"--if playing the mother of a boy who can see the dead is mainstream. The 26-year-old Australian is back to offbeat in English auteur Peter Greenaway's upcoming "Eight and a Half Women."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Writer-director P.J. Hogan may have based "Mental" on an actual incident from his childhood, but the crazy quilt of a movie that resulted feels anything but real. This strained, shrill effort, set in small-town Australia, revolves around the über-quirky Moochmore clan: "Sound of Music"-obsessed mother Shirley (Rebecca Gibney), absentee dad - and local mayor - Barry (Anthony LaPaglia) and their five off-kilter daughters. When Shirley has a colorful nervous breakdown, Barry sticks her in a mental hospital, then randomly hires screwy, knife-wielding hitchhiker Shaz (Hogan's "Muriel's Wedding" star Toni Collette)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2003 | John Clark, Special to The Times
On a snowy afternoon here, actress Toni Collette is half an hour late for an appointment, prompting her to say, "You've been sitting here so long. You look so bored. Do you want to talk about something else?" Her concern is disconcerting. Actors are accustomed to talking about themselves -- it would seldom occur to most of them to talk about something else. Collette, however, seems open to anything. At least that's the way she comes across during a conversation at a swanky, pseudo-anonymous lower Manhattan hotel lobby.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
WHEN you think about meeting actress Toni Collette, it's natural to think about which Toni Collette you are going to meet. Will it be the put-upon but triumphant Muriel Heslop of "Muriel's Wedding," the desperately worried mother of "The Sixth Sense" or the no-nonsense geologist of "Japanese Story"? Or one of the two wildly different roles the Australian actress has in films debuting at this year's Sundance film festival?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik and John Horn, Los Angeles Times
PARK CITY, Utah - A group of star-driven dramas and comedies, plus a half-dozen documentaries, have caught the fancy of buyers at the Sundance Film Festival, with distributors ponying up nearly $25 million in the last few days for movies they hope will return their investment in spades. Fox Searchlight paid close to $10 million for a Steve Carell movie, and Sony shelled out almost $4 million on a Jane Austen-themed comedy. Relativity Media spent $4 million for a Joseph Gordon-Levitt porn comedy and the Weinstein Co. put up about $2 million for a well-received drama, "Fruitvale.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Writer-director P.J. Hogan may have based "Mental" on an actual incident from his childhood, but the crazy quilt of a movie that resulted feels anything but real. This strained, shrill effort, set in small-town Australia, revolves around the über-quirky Moochmore clan: "Sound of Music"-obsessed mother Shirley (Rebecca Gibney), absentee dad - and local mayor - Barry (Anthony LaPaglia) and their five off-kilter daughters. When Shirley has a colorful nervous breakdown, Barry sticks her in a mental hospital, then randomly hires screwy, knife-wielding hitchhiker Shaz (Hogan's "Muriel's Wedding" star Toni Collette)
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Randee Dawn
Actors and costume designers have a rare relationship on set: They're both involved in building a person, using the actor's body as the raw materials. It's a relationship built on trust and talent, and when everything goes well, clothes really do make the man (or woman). Here's a peek behind the scenes of four such recent partnerships. 'Hitchcock' Toni Collette (as Peggy Robertson) Julie Weiss (costume designer) The character: As Alfred Hitchcock'sreal-life assistant, Collette's outfits had to establish her as a mid-century working woman but never be too flashy, since Peggy always stood in the reflected glow of the master of suspense.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2010
Where You've Seen Her Jacki Weaver says she's a born actress: "I have always loved pretending to be other people. I think my mother said I came out of the womb pretending to be somebody else. " The Australian landed her first professional acting job at 15 in a musical production of "Cinderella. " Her movie heyday came in the 1970s when she appeared in such films as Peter Weir's "Picnic at Hanging Rock" and "Caddie. " More recently, she worked with Toni Collette and Rachel Griffiths in 1996's "Cosi.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik and John Horn, Los Angeles Times
PARK CITY, Utah - A group of star-driven dramas and comedies, plus a half-dozen documentaries, have caught the fancy of buyers at the Sundance Film Festival, with distributors ponying up nearly $25 million in the last few days for movies they hope will return their investment in spades. Fox Searchlight paid close to $10 million for a Steve Carell movie, and Sony shelled out almost $4 million on a Jane Austen-themed comedy. Relativity Media spent $4 million for a Joseph Gordon-Levitt porn comedy and the Weinstein Co. put up about $2 million for a well-received drama, "Fruitvale.
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Randee Dawn
Actors and costume designers have a rare relationship on set: They're both involved in building a person, using the actor's body as the raw materials. It's a relationship built on trust and talent, and when everything goes well, clothes really do make the man (or woman). Here's a peek behind the scenes of four such recent partnerships. 'Hitchcock' Toni Collette (as Peggy Robertson) Julie Weiss (costume designer) The character: As Alfred Hitchcock'sreal-life assistant, Collette's outfits had to establish her as a mid-century working woman but never be too flashy, since Peggy always stood in the reflected glow of the master of suspense.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2010
Where You've Seen Her Jacki Weaver says she's a born actress: "I have always loved pretending to be other people. I think my mother said I came out of the womb pretending to be somebody else. " The Australian landed her first professional acting job at 15 in a musical production of "Cinderella. " Her movie heyday came in the 1970s when she appeared in such films as Peter Weir's "Picnic at Hanging Rock" and "Caddie. " More recently, she worked with Toni Collette and Rachel Griffiths in 1996's "Cosi.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The problem for 13-year-old Esther is not so much fitting in, which she doesn't, but trying not to stand out, which she does, in first-time filmmaker Cathy Randall's quirky coming-of-age comedy, "Hey Hey It's Esther Blueburger." This small Australian indie has become something of a favorite on the film festival circuit, and it's easy to see why. Newcomer Danielle Catanzariti is a delight as Esther, moving from dutiful daughter and diligent student to class-cutting rebel running with a group of tough chicks who maybe aren't so tough at all. Randall sets the stage from Esther's point of view — a typical lunch break at her posh private school where she's the only Jewish student.
NEWS
January 6, 2010 | By Lisa Rosen
The heroine of "United States of Tara" is not your average wife and mother. Living with dissociative identity disorder (DID), Tara has four alternate identities that pop up in times of great stress, which invariably mess with her life and the lives of her family members. Fortunately for all involved, she's played by Toni Collette, who's not average at anything. (The show's executive producers, Steven Spielberg and Diablo Cody, are no slouches either.) When the Showtime series began last January, Tara had gone off her medication in the hopes of learning the source of the disorder.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2009 | Rebecca Snavely
Tara is the typical American woman -- a wife, a mom and a working professional -- you know, totally insane. In Showtime's "The United States of Tara," created by Oscar-winning screenwriter Diablo Cody and based on an idea from executive producer Steven Spielberg, the clashing identities of the title character go far deeper than the norm.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The problem for 13-year-old Esther is not so much fitting in, which she doesn't, but trying not to stand out, which she does, in first-time filmmaker Cathy Randall's quirky coming-of-age comedy, "Hey Hey It's Esther Blueburger." This small Australian indie has become something of a favorite on the film festival circuit, and it's easy to see why. Newcomer Danielle Catanzariti is a delight as Esther, moving from dutiful daughter and diligent student to class-cutting rebel running with a group of tough chicks who maybe aren't so tough at all. Randall sets the stage from Esther's point of view — a typical lunch break at her posh private school where she's the only Jewish student.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2000 | KATHLEEN CRAUGHWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Toni Collette was in town recently prepping for the Academy Awards, she had her two "mums" help her choose a dress to wear to the Oscars--her real mother, who flew in from Australia, and her "screen mum," Jeanie Drynan, who played her defeated, much put-upon mother in the comedy-drama "Muriel's Wedding." "Rachel [Griffiths] comes to visit too," says Drynan, who now lives in West Hollywood. "She was recently here at the Chateau Marmont when she was working on ["Blow"] with Johnny Depp."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
The family comedy has undergone some transformations of late, thanks mostly to cable television and its restless search for buttons and/or envelopes to push.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
WHEN you think about meeting actress Toni Collette, it's natural to think about which Toni Collette you are going to meet. Will it be the put-upon but triumphant Muriel Heslop of "Muriel's Wedding," the desperately worried mother of "The Sixth Sense" or the no-nonsense geologist of "Japanese Story"? Or one of the two wildly different roles the Australian actress has in films debuting at this year's Sundance film festival?
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