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Toni Morrison

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NEWS
March 25, 2004 | From Associated Press
Soprano Jessye Norman has joined mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves for a production of "Margaret Garner," a collaboration between composer Richard Danielpour and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Toni Morrison. Michigan Opera Theatre and opera companies in Philadelphia and Cincinnati commissioned the opera, scheduled to premiere at the Detroit Opera House in May 2005.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Call it, if you will, the virtual literary event of the year. Or of February at least. Toni Morrison, the grande dame of American letters, is holding what's billed as a "first-of-its-kind digital book signing" Wednesday at noon PST (3 p.m. EST). Google and Morrison's paperback publisher, Random House division Vintage Books, are teaming up for the event, which will be held at Google's New York office and will stream live on various websites. "Using a Wacom tablet, Morrison will sign digital versions of her newest national bestseller, 'Home,'" says a Random House news release.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Home A Novel Toni Morrison Alfred A. Knopf: 148 pp., $24 I've long admired Toni Morrison as a moral visionary, but her fiction, not so much. Of her nine novels, three - "Song of Solomon" (1977), "Beloved" (1987) and 2008's "A Mercy" - are masterpieces, yet the others, particularly the post-Nobel books "Paradise" (1997) and "Love" (2003) can be so stylized as to veer dangerously close to self-parody. Anyone who's read her in any depth may understand what I'm referring to: those stentorian rhythms, the biblical cadences, the characters who function more as archetypes than flesh-and-blood.
OPINION
June 14, 2012 | MEGHAN DAUM
It's been a month since President Obama announced his support for same-sex marriage and was declared, on the cover of Newsweek, "the first gay president. " That's an eternity in politics, but Obama's swing through California last week, which included a Beverly Hills fundraiser sponsored by the LGBT Leadership Council and a $25,000-per-plate dinner hosted by "Glee" creator Ryan Murphy, got me thinking about his gayness all over again. Make that his ungayness. It's not just that the president was clueless enough to overlook the possibility that a joke about his wife "not going down all the way" when competing against Ellen DeGeneres in push-ups would be interpreted as a dirty double-entendre.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Call it, if you will, the virtual literary event of the year. Or of February at least. Toni Morrison, the grande dame of American letters, is holding what's billed as a "first-of-its-kind digital book signing" Wednesday at noon PST (3 p.m. EST). Google and Morrison's paperback publisher, Random House division Vintage Books, are teaming up for the event, which will be held at Google's New York office and will stream live on various websites. "Using a Wacom tablet, Morrison will sign digital versions of her newest national bestseller, 'Home,'" says a Random House news release.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2003 | From Associated Press
Nobel Prize-winning novelist Toni Morrison is collaborating on an opera based on the life of an escaped slave who tried to kill her family to avoid returning to captivity. Michigan Opera Theatre and opera companies in Philadelphia and Cincinnati commissioned the work by Morrison and American composer Richard Danielpour. It's scheduled to premiere at the Detroit Opera House in May 2005. "Margaret Garner" is based on Garner's flight from Kentucky to the free state of Ohio in 1856.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Praising her as "a literary artist of the first rank," the Swedish Academy awarded Toni Morrison the 1993 Nobel Prize in literature Thursday for accounts of the black experience written "with the luster of poetry." Morrison became the first black American woman to win the Nobel Prize and only the second American woman to receive the award, following novelist Pearl S. Buck by 55 years.
MAGAZINE
January 16, 1994 | Wanda Coleman
Gather into the mind Over a hundred years of a people Toiling against climate Working against prejudice Growing within an alien framework Cramped, but stretching its limbs And staring against the sun. --A.J. Seymour At last! Goshdarnit!" When Toni Morrison was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature last fall, I greeted the news with mixed emotions, plus a little envy. But any ruefulness on my part was overshadowed by a grudging satisfaction.
BOOKS
August 30, 1987 | John Leonard, Leonard is a novelist and critic living in New York
Toni Morrison's masterwork is a ghost story about history. At the center of its circle is an act as awful as anything imagined in the Old Testament or Greek mythology. Inside this circle of space-time--spellbound, dream-dazed--the living and the dead talk to and lay hands upon each other. Madness and memory cohabit. It's as if history were our collective unconscious, and the dead, like the repressed, return. Remember slavery? Morrison does.
BOOKS
April 19, 1992 | RICHARD EDER
"Jazz" is a half-waking dream on a lumpy corncob mattress. Its voices shift, almost in a single sentence, from down-to-earth to intensely poetical. It alternately asserts, and transforms what it asserts. Each shift--each page, virtually--begins with a tangible jolt of discovery, and dissolves, making way for the next shift and dissolution. It can be difficult to follow, yet immensely exhilarating.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Home A Novel Toni Morrison Alfred A. Knopf: 148 pp., $24 I've long admired Toni Morrison as a moral visionary, but her fiction, not so much. Of her nine novels, three - "Song of Solomon" (1977), "Beloved" (1987) and 2008's "A Mercy" - are masterpieces, yet the others, particularly the post-Nobel books "Paradise" (1997) and "Love" (2003) can be so stylized as to veer dangerously close to self-parody. Anyone who's read her in any depth may understand what I'm referring to: those stentorian rhythms, the biblical cadences, the characters who function more as archetypes than flesh-and-blood.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
It may be impossible for an author to achieve more acclaim than Toni Morrison, now 81, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1993. Her work is "characterized by visionary force and poetic import," the Nobel Committee wrote, and we'll get more of it May 8, when her 10th novel is published. "Home" is the story of an angry African American veteran of the Korean War who returns, unhappily, to the Georgia community where he was raised. She's not the only Nobel Prize winner returning to shelves.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2010
The J. Paul Getty Trust is being told once more that its money ? this time $44.9 million ? may be no good in Great Britain, where authorities have blocked the sale of a prized landscape painting of Rome by J.M.W. Turner that the Getty appeared to have bought in a July auction in London. Britain's culture minister, Ed Vaizy, announced Wednesday that the required export license for "Modern Rome ? Campo Vaccino," which Turner painted in 1839, will be held up through Feb. 2, and possibly until Aug. 1, to give potential buyers who want to keep the painting on British soil a chance to match the Getty's bid. The Getty bid for the Turner knowing the sale could be negated, as happened in 2004, when the National Gallery of London was able to match the $46.6-million price the Getty had agreed to pay two years earlier to buy Raphael's "Madonna of the Pinks" from the Duke of Northumberland.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2009 | Associated Press
The setting was divine: a duplex on the Upper East Side. The featured speaker: Nobel laureate Toni Morrison. The subjects: sex, violence and profanity. In other words, the stuff that books are banned for. Some 50 publishers, writers and other 1st Amendment supporters gathered Wednesday night to launch the Free Speech Leadership Council, an advocacy arm of the National Coalition Against Censorship, a nonprofit founded in 1974. Morrison, 78, has long experience with censorship.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2009 | Janet Kinosian, Kinosian is a freelance critic.
If Nobel laureate Toni Morrison edits a collection of famous writers on the subject of censorship and the power of the written word, wouldn't you expect a firecracker read? After all, what better lightning-rod topic exists for writers than the threat of shutting off their computers?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2008 | Judith Freeman, Freeman's most recent book, "The Long Embrace: Raymond Chandler and the Woman He Loved," has just come out in paperback.
In the introduction to an edition of "Beloved" published after she won the Nobel Prize in literature, Toni Morrison notes that in 1983, she decided to quit her job as an editor at a New York publishing house in order to focus solely on her own work. By then, Morrison had already published four novels, and she felt it was time to "live as a grown-up writer," off royalties and writing alone. As it turns out, this was a wise decision, if also an unsettling one.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2008 | Judith Freeman, Freeman's most recent book, "The Long Embrace: Raymond Chandler and the Woman He Loved," has just come out in paperback.
In the introduction to an edition of "Beloved" published after she won the Nobel Prize in literature, Toni Morrison notes that in 1983, she decided to quit her job as an editor at a New York publishing house in order to focus solely on her own work. By then, Morrison had already published four novels, and she felt it was time to "live as a grown-up writer," off royalties and writing alone. As it turns out, this was a wise decision, if also an unsettling one.
BOOKS
January 11, 1998 | RICHARD EDER
The vigilantes drive through predawn darkness to a decrepit mansion in the Oklahoma countryside. A tiny community of women, mostly black or of mixed blood, lives there, and rumors of weird and perverted practices have infuriated the right-thinking people of Ruby, the nearest town. Equipped with rope, a palm-leaf cross, handcuffs, Mace, sunglasses and "clean handsome guns," the men blast open the front door. "They shoot the white girl first. With the rest they can take their time."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2008 | Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Last winter, Nobel laureate Toni Morrison received a phone call from Sen. Barack Obama, then the underdog to Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton for the Democratic presidential nomination. Obama had contacted Morrison to ask for her support. But before they got into politics, the author and the candidate chatted about literature.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2005 | Mike Householder, Associated Press
Margaret Garner will come alive Saturday on the stage of the Detroit Opera House, a century and a half after the escaped slave tried to kill her children rather than see them live in bondage. The highly anticipated production is the first foray into the world of opera for Grammy-winning composer Richard Danielpour, who created the music, and Nobel Prize-winning novelist Toni Morrison, who wrote the libretto and whose 1987 novel "Beloved" was inspired by the Garner story.
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