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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
Tom Anaya is mad about soccer. And he wants to make other people mad, too. He wants children to get as mad about the sport as he is. He wants parents to get mad at the lack of volunteers to teach the kids. As commissioner of the American Youth Soccer Organization's Santa Ana region, Anaya presides over 500 players on 38 teams, a dramatic increase from the 120 players in the league just five years ago.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
Tom Anaya is mad about soccer. And he wants to make other people mad, too. He wants children to get as mad about the sport as he is. He wants parents to get mad at the lack of volunteers to teach the kids. As commissioner of the American Youth Soccer Organization's Santa Ana region, Anaya presides over 500 players on 38 teams, a dramatic increase from the 120 players in the league just five years ago.
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NEWS
November 20, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Fiman, formerly president of a Santa Monica-based advertising group and a top executive of the defunct Cannon Pictures Inc., has died at age 49. Fiman, who moved to Atlanta after Cannon dissolved in 1994, died there Monday of a cerebral hemorrhage. In 1975, Fiman became president of Martin & Benedict, a major media buying and advertising firm with such clients as MGM / UA, Warner Bros., Atlantic Releasing, Transworld Films and Lorimar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1988
With this state's first execution since 1967 likely to be carried out this year, Californians should carefully rethink the logical and ethical premises on which capital punishment is based. In this context, I would like to reiterate the argument against capital punishment set forth by former New Mexico Gov. Tony Anaya in The Times Opinion section on Dec. 14, 1986: 1. If the state executes an innocent person--a very real possibility--there is no redress. 2. Capital punishment is uneconomical because the mandatory appeal procedure costs more than life imprisonment.
OPINION
March 20, 2009
New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson has had his share of setbacks recently. He ran for president and never came close. Then he was considered for a spot in the Obama administration but was forced to withdraw. Those detours sent him home to New Mexico to resume his governorship, and for that we are grateful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1986 | H.G. REZA, Times Staff Writer
The House Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control will hold hearings in San Diego next week to look into the growing problem of drug smuggling from Mexico into the United States, especially California. At last week's meeting in Mexicali between President Reagan and Mexican President Miguel de la Madrid, Administration officials said that Mexico is a major supplier of marijuana and heroin to the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1988 | CLAUDIA LUTHER, Times Political Writer
Orange County Democratic activists say presidential politics have not been this much fun in years. Going into the June 7 primary, Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis and the Rev. Jesse Jackson have active campaigns in the county, where the 2-1 Republican majority usually lends a certain glumness to Democratic politics. "There is something going on in this campaign I haven't seen in a long, long time," said Howard Adler of Lake Forest, a longtime Democratic activist who is backing Dukakis.
NEWS
September 1, 1985 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
Dressed casually, standing in the morning sunshine packing the station wagon for a camping trip with his wife, son, two daughters and the family dog, Dr. Fitzhugh Mullan looks like neither the highest-ranking health official in New Mexico nor a man nearly killed by cancer a decade ago. In reality, Mullan, 43, is both. He oversees 3,300 employees and a budget of $160 million as secretary for health and environment to Gov. Tony Anaya, one of the nation's most controversial state house leaders.
NEWS
April 7, 1985 | JOHN BALZAR, Times Political Writer
California hasn't seen politics like this in a long time: The most important woman in state government, Rose Elizabeth Bird, a champion of unreconstructed liberal idealism, locked in a 20-month, multimillion-dollar election campaign against the mightiest and most determined of California's conservatives. At stake is the future of the state's judiciary, the rule of law, the safety of the streets and the conscience of California--in short, crime and justice. Or so the warring parties say.
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