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May 5, 1996 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, it would appear that preparations for the 80th Indianapolis 500 on May 26 are proceeding much as they have in past years. The track opened Saturday with the usual pomp and ceremony befitting the world's biggest single-day sporting event. The mayor had his welcoming breakfast, the rookie drivers were given an introductory ride with three-time winner Johnny Rutherford and everyone was wondering how high speeds might climb on a newly paved track.
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October 31, 2012 | By Jim Peltz
The series that runs the famed Indianapolis 500 and other races featuring Indy-style cars this year enjoyed one of its most exciting seasons. It was capped by a dramatic finale at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, where the title was decided on the final lap in favor of driver Ryan Hunter-Reay, the series' first American champion in six years. But six weeks after the season ended, all that is being overshadowed by the drama, yet again, within IndyCar's leadership. The directors who control the Izod IndyCar Series on Sunday parted ways with the series' chief executive, Randy Bernard, whom they hired nearly three years ago to reinvigorate the struggling sport.
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SPORTS
May 24, 1990 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The drivers might be getting older in the Indianapolis 500, but management is getting younger. Tony George, grandson of the late Tony Hulman, who saved the Indianapolis Motor Speedway when he bought it in 1945, is the new president of the speedway and, at 30, is younger than all but five of the 33 starters in Sunday's 74th Indianapolis 500. George took over the family-owned Hulman raceway empire in January, shortly after the death of 81-year-old Joe Cloutier in November.
SPORTS
October 28, 2012 | By Jim Peltz
Randy Bernard stepped down as the Izod IndyCar Series' chief executive Sunday after three seasons of trying to revitalize the struggling sport that includes the legendary Indianapolis 500. Bernard's departure came after a special meeting of directors of Indianapolis Motor Speedway Corp., the series' parent that is led by the Hulman-George family, which said both sides agreed "the timing was right to pursue separate paths. " Jeff Belskus, chief executive of Indianapolis Motor Speedway Corp., was named interim chief executive of IndyCar, whose 15-race season this year was capped by a return to Auto Club Speedway in Fontana in September.
SPORTS
July 8, 2009 | Jim Peltz
The IndyCar Series heads to its next race Sunday in Toronto with new leadership after the series' controversial founder, Tony George, was replaced by his family's company. George, 49, had headed the Indianapolis Motor Speedway since 1990 and had created the series and its parent, the Indy Racing League, in the mid-1990s.
SPORTS
September 17, 2012 | By Jim Peltz
Say what you will about the troubled state of IndyCar racing — and there's no shortage of problems to discuss — but the series still can put on a compelling show. That was evident on a hot Saturday night at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, where the Izod IndyCar Series returned for the first time in seven years. The MAVTV 500 was the series' season finale, with drivers Will Power and Ryan Hunter-Reay locked in a close championship battle. So there was a race within the race, with 26 drivers trying not only to win the event but Power and Hunter-Reay trying to finish high enough to capture the title.
SPORTS
May 11, 1996
Tony George's controversial change in qualifying for the Indianapolis 500 [May 5] was an effort to ensure full fields at Indy Racing League events. There were only two races before the 500 and the CART guys could have participated, seeing as this was announced last July. Yes, this would have necessitated a change in CART's 1996 schedule, but they would have made Indy easily and probably shown up the upstart IRL teams. I am not anti-CART, but I agree with Tony George's and the Speedway's position.
SPORTS
May 24, 1996 | JIM MURRAY
There is a gruesome military adage that sometimes it is necessary to destroy a village (or a country) in order to save it. There are those who think this is what Anton Hulman George is bent on doing to the sport of auto racing--or at least the Indianapolis 500, which is only the fountainhead of the sport all over the world.
SPORTS
May 25, 1996
While the L.A. Times sports section is quick to side with the Indy 500 by writing about how many drivers have qualified for CART's U.S. 500 below the Indy 500 minimum qualifying speed of 220 mph, you should have also noted that CART, in the interest of safety for its drivers, every year tries to slow its cars down through changes in regulations and car specs. Tony George says he wants to see Indy cars return to their roots of the old days. Well, those old days also included a lot of mayhem and deaths.
SPORTS
May 18, 1996
As a real racing fan, I am sick and tired of the biased coverage you are giving this year's counterfeit Indy 500. Who cares about a collection of mostly no-names, unknowns and wannabes? Obviously, the huge fall-off in the traditional qualifying-day crowds clearly shows the fans' true feelings. Why does the so-called educated press feed into this sham? When every survey made in the last year is overwhelmingly against Tony George and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway for raping the traditions of America's most historic motor-car race?
SPORTS
September 17, 2012 | By Jim Peltz
Say what you will about the troubled state of IndyCar racing — and there's no shortage of problems to discuss — but the series still can put on a compelling show. That was evident on a hot Saturday night at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, where the Izod IndyCar Series returned for the first time in seven years. The MAVTV 500 was the series' season finale, with drivers Will Power and Ryan Hunter-Reay locked in a close championship battle. So there was a race within the race, with 26 drivers trying not only to win the event but Power and Hunter-Reay trying to finish high enough to capture the title.
SPORTS
October 3, 2011 | By Jim Peltz
IndyCar racing is struggling to overcome several problems that include weak attendance and television ratings and the decision by Danica Patrick, perhaps its most popular driver, to bolt for NASCAR stock car racing next year. But say this about the Izod IndyCar Series: It can still put on a thrilling race besides its crown jewel, the Indianapolis 500. For the last 20 laps in Sunday's Kentucky Indy 300, little-known Ed Carpenter raced side by side with reigning series champion Dario Franchitti at more than 200 mph. Round and round they went only a few feet apart on the 1.5-mile Kentucky Speedway oval, with neither driver willing to cede the lead to the other.
SPORTS
July 8, 2009 | Jim Peltz
The IndyCar Series heads to its next race Sunday in Toronto with new leadership after the series' controversial founder, Tony George, was replaced by his family's company. George, 49, had headed the Indianapolis Motor Speedway since 1990 and had created the series and its parent, the Indy Racing League, in the mid-1990s.
SPORTS
September 21, 2002
I was amazed to see an article by Shav Glick on CART ["Andretti to Put IRL before CART," Sept. 18]. It's not the week of the Long Beach Grand Prix or Fontana, so it must be an opportunity for him to act in his other capacity, de facto spokesman for Tony George and the IRL. The IRL was supposed to be a breeding ground for American drivers, yet of the three drivers announced switching over to the IRL, two are foreigners, as were both of Roger Penske's...
SPORTS
September 18, 2002 | SHAV GLICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Andretti, the winningest driver in CART history, announced Tuesday that he was taking fellow CART drivers Dario Franchitti and Tony Kanaan with him to the Indy Racing League next year as part of the new Andretti Green Racing team. It is the latest blow to CART, the older of the two open-wheel racing sanctioning bodies, which has been troubled by a lack of teams and drivers for this season's races and the loss of two of its engine suppliers next year.
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October 12, 2001 | JONATHAN FREEDLAND, Jonathan Freedland is a columnist for the Guardian newspaper and the author of "Bring Home the Revolution" (4th Estate, 1998)
There's a new star on the world stage since Sept. 11, a new No. 2 in the global world order: Britain's prime minister, Tony Blair. Putting aside the 50 years when Britain was seen as a middle-ranking country off the coast of continental Europe, Blair is conducting himself as George W. Bush's co-star. He has made the key diplomatic missions to Moscow, Islamabad, New Delhi and Oman.
SPORTS
September 21, 2002
I was amazed to see an article by Shav Glick on CART ["Andretti to Put IRL before CART," Sept. 18]. It's not the week of the Long Beach Grand Prix or Fontana, so it must be an opportunity for him to act in his other capacity, de facto spokesman for Tony George and the IRL. The IRL was supposed to be a breeding ground for American drivers, yet of the three drivers announced switching over to the IRL, two are foreigners, as were both of Roger Penske's...
SPORTS
June 5, 1999
A.J. Foyt's victory as a car owner at Indianapolis last weekend must, without question, be considered hollow. When I watch the Winston Cup NASCAR races, I know I am watching the best cars and best drivers in that class. The same thing applies to the NHRA dragsters and Formula One race cars. Tony George rolls out the publicity machinery, using Foyt as his mouthpiece, and continues to proclaim the Indianapolis 500 as the greatest spectacle in racing. It is not, nor will it ever be, as long as the IRL continues to exclude superior technology and superior drivers.
SPORTS
October 1, 1999 | SHAV GLICK
Hopes that Championship Auto Racing Teams and the Indy Racing League, the country's feuding open-wheel racing organizations, were about to reach unification in 2001 or 2002 apparently have been dashed by Tony George, who opened the schism when he formed the IRL four years ago.
SPORTS
June 5, 1999
A.J. Foyt's victory as a car owner at Indianapolis last weekend must, without question, be considered hollow. When I watch the Winston Cup NASCAR races, I know I am watching the best cars and best drivers in that class. The same thing applies to the NHRA dragsters and Formula One race cars. Tony George rolls out the publicity machinery, using Foyt as his mouthpiece, and continues to proclaim the Indianapolis 500 as the greatest spectacle in racing. It is not, nor will it ever be, as long as the IRL continues to exclude superior technology and superior drivers.
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