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Tony Kushner

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July 31, 1994 | PATRICK PACHECO, Patrick Pacheco is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Prominently displayed in the foyer of playwright Tony Kushner's sprawling new apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side is a striking work by Kukuli Valarde, a South Bronx artist. In a votive box, a masked figure of an Aztec woman stands flanked by angels with large phalluses; the subject is Malinche, an interpreter for the Spanish conquistadors. A delivery boy from Kushner's local takeout had another interpretation. "He thought it was a god," Kushner says. "And, after looking around and observing to me that it appeared I was doing rather well, he wanted to know where he might get one."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By David Ng
Singer k.d lang will bring her singular brand of pop-country music to the annual Hammer Museum gala, set for Oct. 5. Ann Philbin, the museum's director, confirmed in an interview that lang will perform at the fundraising dinner.  The Hammer will honor artist Robert Gober and playwright Tony Kushner at its 11th annual gala. The event is being chaired by Rita Wilson and Tom Hanks, along with Tomas Maier. Among the scheduled speakers will be Viola Davis and artist Charles Ray. The museum said the evening includes a viewing of current exhibitions and cocktails followed by a seated dinner.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | By Patrick Pacheco, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Among the many issues in "Angels in America," Tony Kushner's millennial epic about gay men coping with the AIDS pandemic in Ronald Reagan's America, is that overused word in the national lexicon: "Change. " The play offers an answer to the question: "How do people change?" ? from a talking "dummy," the mother figure in a western diorama: "God splits the skin with a jagged thumbnail from throat to belly and then plunges a huge, filthy hand in ?. " If that sounds painful. It's meant to. Nearly two decades after writing the passage, Kushner says that change, personal or political, hasn't become any easier.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By David Ng
The Hammer Museum in Westwood will honor artist Robert Gober and playwright Tony Kushner at its 11th annual gala, scheduled to take place Oct. 5. Tom Hanks and his wife, Rita Wilson, are co-chairing this year's fundraising benefit for the museum, which will also feature an appearance by actress Viola Davis, who will toast Kushner. Both Gober and Kushner live in New York, but neither is a stranger to Los Angeles. Gober was in the local spotlight in 1997 at the Museum of Contemporary Art, where he presented a large-scale installation at the Geffen Contemporary.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Randee Dawn
Tony Kushner had a decade's worth of plays behind him when his epic two-part masterpiece, "Angels in America," exploded in the mainstream in 1992, going on to win the Pulitzer Prize, two best play Tonys and a clutch of other stage awards. In adapting the play with Mike Nichols for cable TV, he discovered a fresh way to tell stories; "Angels" eventually won 11 Emmys for HBO in 2004. Since then, the playwright has added screenwriting to his credits with 2005's "Munich" and this year's "Lincoln" (both for director Steven Spielberg)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
"Lincoln" has been a big hit in movie theaters, and on Jan. 22 Tony Kushner's screenplay for Steven Spielberg's film will arrive in book form, to be followed in late February by another new Kushner book -- the revised script for "Angels in America," the early 1990s stage drama that established him as a leading playwright. Kushner's longtime publisher, Theatre Communications Group, is issuing both volumes -- the film script about Abraham Lincoln's struggle to push the constitutional amendment abolishing slavery through Congress during the waning days of the Civil War, and the epic, seven-hour play about gay men trying to cope with the AIDs crisis during the 1980s.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As almost no American play has ever done, Tony Kushner's "Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes" has been a rapid triumph in Los Angeles, San Francisco, London and Broadway, with a Pulitzer Prize and multiple Tony Award nominations in the process--and all on the uncompromising terms of its maker.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Tony Kushner's landmark achievements have been “Angels in America,” the epic 1992 stage play that showed humanly flawed gay men loving, honoring and cherishing each other amid the fear and horror of the 1980s AIDS crisis, and the screenplay to Steven Spielberg's acclaimed 2012 film “Lincoln,” a memorably taut depiction of American democracy bucking, churning and grinding to right a historic wrong. Kushner spent Wednesday morning sitting on the couch with his husband, Mark Harris, in their Manhattan home, watching and waiting for the U.S. Supreme Court to rule on matters that brought thematic strands from those two dramas together.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Tony Kushner is writing a new play that will premiere at the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis in the spring of 2009. The Guthrie commissioned Kushner, who wrote the epic AIDS drama "Angels in America," to write a play that he is tentatively calling "The Intelligent Homosexual's Guide to Capitalism and Socialism With a Key to the Scriptures," Guthrie director Joe Dowling said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1996
Tony Kushner's article (Opinion, May 19) on gay marriage was most interesting, not so much for its ideological content, but rather for what it reveals about the tunnel vision that afflicts much of the politically organized gay community these days. Kushner makes the assertion that the virtues of gay marriage are "unarguable, unless you are crazy and stupid," which is a rather odd position to take. It is an anthropological given that all societies throughout human history have constructed marriage to conform to the dictates of human biology.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Tony Kushner's landmark achievements have been “Angels in America,” the epic 1992 stage play that showed humanly flawed gay men loving, honoring and cherishing each other amid the fear and horror of the 1980s AIDS crisis, and the screenplay to Steven Spielberg's acclaimed 2012 film “Lincoln,” a memorably taut depiction of American democracy bucking, churning and grinding to right a historic wrong. Kushner spent Wednesday morning sitting on the couch with his husband, Mark Harris, in their Manhattan home, watching and waiting for the U.S. Supreme Court to rule on matters that brought thematic strands from those two dramas together.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Anna Deavere Smith, famed for creating one-woman, documentary theater pieces about taut social issues in which she portrays multiple people she's interviewed, has won the $300,000 Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize, one of the most lucrative awards in the arts and literature. The annual career-achievement award, initiated in 1994 when Los Angeles architect Frank Gehry was the first recipient, is for “an outstanding contribution to the beauty of the world and to mankind's understanding and enjoyment of life.” It was created under the will of Lillian Gish, whose long career -- including roles alongside her younger sister, Dorothy -- began as one of Hollywood's first superstar actresses.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Randee Dawn
Tony Kushner had a decade's worth of plays behind him when his epic two-part masterpiece, "Angels in America," exploded in the mainstream in 1992, going on to win the Pulitzer Prize, two best play Tonys and a clutch of other stage awards. In adapting the play with Mike Nichols for cable TV, he discovered a fresh way to tell stories; "Angels" eventually won 11 Emmys for HBO in 2004. Since then, the playwright has added screenwriting to his credits with 2005's "Munich" and this year's "Lincoln" (both for director Steven Spielberg)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
"Lincoln" has been a big hit in movie theaters, and on Jan. 22 Tony Kushner's screenplay for Steven Spielberg's film will arrive in book form, to be followed in late February by another new Kushner book -- the revised script for "Angels in America," the early 1990s stage drama that established him as a leading playwright. Kushner's longtime publisher, Theatre Communications Group, is issuing both volumes -- the film script about Abraham Lincoln's struggle to push the constitutional amendment abolishing slavery through Congress during the waning days of the Civil War, and the epic, seven-hour play about gay men trying to cope with the AIDs crisis during the 1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
In December 2001, the original production of Tony Kushner's globe-trotting drama "Homebody/Kabul" opened at a small New York theater. Kushner, author of "Angels In America" and the script for Steven Spielberg's heralded epic "Lincoln," had written the play several months before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and the subsequent U.S. invasion of Afghanistan. Yet the themes of "Homebody/Kabul" - global politics, human upheaval and the historically tortured relationship between Afghanistan and the West - were so timely that it seemed as if Kushner had been gazing into a crystal ball or the collected writings of Nostradamus.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" is a historical biopic more concerned with depicting the 16th president's log-rolling politics than his log-splitting childhood. "Lincoln," one of many high-profile films this season based on real events, has been warmly embraced by critics and audiences. But there's another group whose opinion matters - historians. "There have been other movies about Lincoln," said James McPherson, a Civil War historian, Lincoln biographer and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "Battle Cry of Freedom," in a recent interview after seeing the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"Ours is a time of connection," says a British woman, about to disappear inside a surreal version of Afghanistan, in Tony Kushner's "Homebody/Kabul." The new play is scheduled to open in December at the New York Theatre Workshop. "The private, and we must accept this, the private is gone. All must be touched. All touch corrupts. All must be corrupted." These words of bittersweet globalism carry an especially acidic tinge after the Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2010 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times
The American Stage Writing on Theater From Washington Irving to Tony Kushner Edited by Laurence Senelick Library of America: 850 pp., $40 Talk about not catching a break: Eclipsed by movies on the pop culture front, the theater also gets shunned at literary functions. Now the Library of America has thrown salt in the wounds with "The American Stage," a mishmash of more than 200 years of theater writing. A grab-bag sensibility is probably unavoidable, but by including not just criticism but also memoir, journalism and other varieties of scribbling, editor Laurence Senelick — a professor of drama at Tufts — practically ensures the book's lack of usefulness.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
In the spring of 2011, Steven Spielberg received a hand-addressed package at his office on the Universal Studios lot, marked ominously with a skull and crossbones. The director, who was months from starting production on his next movie, "Lincoln," closed his door, opened the package and removed an old pocket cassette recorder. "I literally for 10 minutes was afraid to turn it on, because I expected that whatever I heard on that tape was going to be my film, my entire film," Spielberg said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Twenty years ago this week, the stage lights went up on "Angels in America" at the Mark Taper Forum, and audiences immediately heard an aged rabbi in the Bronx proclaim that "great voyages in this world do not anymore exist. " The theatrical journey ended seven hours later with playwright Tony Kushner's AIDS-stricken protagonist, Prior Walter, assuring the audience that it wasn't so: "You are fabulous creatures, each and everyone. And I bless you. More Life . The Great Work Begins.
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