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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
Just about a year ago, author Craig Johnson was riding high. The premiere of "Longmire," the A&E TV series based on his Walt Longmire mystery novels, was the highest rated scripted drama in the network's history and he had just started his book tour for "As the Crow Flies," the eighth book in the series. He had stopped at a diner in Red Lodge, Mont., and as he was paying the cashier for his meal, he noticed an older woman staring at his hat -- a cap bearing the logo of his fictional Absaroka County Sheriff's Department.
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OPINION
March 4, 2014
Re "A mixed bag of food labels," Editorial, Feb. 28 Contrary to The Times' editorial on the Food and Drug Administration's proposed new label requirements for packaged foods, the inclusion of added sugars represents a positive shift toward providing consumers with the information they need to make healthier purchases. Foods heavy in added sugars often have a low nutritional profile. The Times notes that the body responds to added and natural sugars in the same way, but too many added sugars mean more empty calories and less nutrition.
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NEWS
August 1, 2001 | Chris Erskine
Here's what happened, I'm pretty sure. I'm dreaming the sweet dream, the one with Katharine Ross at Super Bowl VII. Midway through the second quarter, I call timeout and marry her on the spot. No tux. Just me in my Vikings uniform and her in that cotton thing she wore in "Butch Cassidy." It's a pretty common dream. Most men have it. When suddenly, some kid awakens me from this dream and climbs into bed with us. Me and my first wife. The kid and her stupid teddy bear. "What's wrong?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | By Jason Wells
A rare whale known for its saber-like teeth and preference for frigid subarctic waters washed ashore in a highly unlikely place Tuesday night: Venice Beach. The female Stejneger's beaked whale - also known as the Saber-toothed whale - was loaded onto the bed of a truck early Wednesday and taken for an autopsy that will give scientists a rare glimpse into the lives of the elusive mammals. So rare, in fact, it sent Nick Fash, an education specialist for Heal the Bay, pedaling his bike down to the site "as fast as I could.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
NEW  YORK -- The hounds-tooth check is turning out to be a trend with some serious legs this season. After first gathering steam at the Milan and Paris men's ready-to-wear shows (at Calvin Klein, Paul Smith  and Versace, among others), we first spotted it running wild  this side of the Atlantic at the Tommy Hilfiger men's runway show in a range of sizes and colors.  (That's where we also learned, thanks to the screens flanking the exits streaming real-time social media reactions, that the Spanish equivalent of hounds-tooth is “la pata de gallo,” which translates as “crow's foot.”)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2009 | Kevin Thomas; Robert Abele
Russell Brown's hilarious, acutely knowing "The Blue Tooth Virgin" takes its title from a screenplay an aspiring screenwriter, Sam (Austin Peck), has given to his friend David (Bryce Johnson), a successful magazine editor, to read. David finds the script terrible, a murky business about a troubled young woman with an urge to morph. David tries to let Sam down easy, but Sam, who did write a well-received TV series that ran one season, can't take criticism. Returning to his apartment, Sam is further dismayed to discover that his wife (Lauren Stamile)
HOME & GARDEN
October 21, 2004 | Lisa Boone
When her daughter lost her first tooth, Julie Kentera felt uncomfortable playing the role of a cash-doling tooth fairy. "It just felt wrong that the celebration for such a milestone had become -- cash," says Kentera. "Where's ceremony or sentiment in that?" The incident inspired the stay-at-home mother of two to create DreamPearls for Girls, a handcrafted bracelet made of Swarovski crystals and sterling silver.
SCIENCE
October 4, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
The duck-billed dinosaurs called hadrosaurids sported hundreds of bewilderingly complex teeth that were optimized for grinding away at the fibrous plants they ate, according to a new study. The hadrosaurids' teeth are made of six distinct materials, according to the report, published Thursday by the journal Science. That makes the teeth far more complex than humans', which are primarily made of two materials, enamel and orthodentine. They are even more complex than the teeth of horses and buffalo, which are made of four materials and also evolved to grind away at plant matter. The hadrosaurids have what scientists call a "dental battery," meaning they have hundreds of teeth that work together when they eat, with new teeth "erupting" into the mouth all the time.
SCIENCE
July 15, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
The Tyrannosaurus rex of "Jurassic Park" fame chases any prey that moves, then devours it with a bone-crushing gnash of its enormous jaws and serrated teeth. But paleontologists don't necessarily back Steven Spielberg's portrayal of T. rex , with some saying it may have simply scavenged the remains of dead animals it happened to find. Now scientists have unearthed what they say is the first direct evidence that the dinosaur king hunted its prey, further supporting its reign at the top of the Cretaceous food chain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1985
Thank you for the provocative essay by Hughes. Such concern needs frequent utterance, but courage to set it forth is rare. There is reason to doubt that human beings will ever get beyond the eye-for-eye, tooth-for-tooth stage of morality. Yet we occasionally meet persons who try to live and work without hate or recrimination. Supporting them are teachings and examples from history's choicest souls. Supporting them too, I hope, is a rising tide of concern for merest human survival, which depends ultimately on a morality of mutual trust and good will.
OPINION
September 9, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Federal efforts to protect growers of sugar beets and sugar cane epitomize everything that's wrong with U.S. farm programs. At times they've artificially raised the price of sugar, costing consumers billions of dollars; at other times they've stuck taxpayers with the bill for the surplus sugar production they've promoted. The fact that the sugar program is likely to survive the latest rewrite of the farm bill unscathed is a testament to how limited the bill's "reforms" are. Sweeteners are ubiquitous in processed foods, and sugar is the most popular by far. There are two primary sources in the United States: sugar beets, which are grown in parts of California (mainly in Imperial County)
SCIENCE
July 18, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian
Dinosaurs almost bankrupted the tooth fairy. New research shows that the lumbering plant-eaters called sauropods produced new teeth as often as twice per month and had up to nine backup teeth in a single tooth socket. While the fearsome Tyrannosaurus rex is known as the king of the dinosaurs, the sauropods were the real royalty. These creatures, including the childhood favorite Apatosaurus (previously known as Brontosaurus ), were the largest animals that ever lived on land.
SCIENCE
July 15, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
The Tyrannosaurus rex of "Jurassic Park" fame chases any prey that moves, then devours it with a bone-crushing gnash of its enormous jaws and serrated teeth. But paleontologists don't necessarily back Steven Spielberg's portrayal of T. rex , with some saying it may have simply scavenged the remains of dead animals it happened to find. Now scientists have unearthed what they say is the first direct evidence that the dinosaur king hunted its prey, further supporting its reign at the top of the Cretaceous food chain.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
Just about a year ago, author Craig Johnson was riding high. The premiere of "Longmire," the A&E TV series based on his Walt Longmire mystery novels, was the highest rated scripted drama in the network's history and he had just started his book tour for "As the Crow Flies," the eighth book in the series. He had stopped at a diner in Red Lodge, Mont., and as he was paying the cashier for his meal, he noticed an older woman staring at his hat -- a cap bearing the logo of his fictional Absaroka County Sheriff's Department.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
Beware of pizza you can chip a tooth on.  Four varieties of California Pizza Kitchen and DiGiorno frozen pizzas have been pulled from grocers' freezers after complaints of plastic fragments in the pies. These aren't bits of plastic wrap but clear, brittle, sharp-edged pieces of plastic, according to the Associated Press. As the Los Angeles Times' Ricardo Lopez reported earlier, it was a voluntary recall by Nestle USA . The products are CPK's crispy thin-crust white pizza and its limited-edition grilled chicken with Cabernet sauce.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2013 | By Alana Semuels, Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Andrew Tangel
BOSTON -- Eight-year-old Martin Richard was a bright, sunny boy who loved to ride his bike and went “wild” when he played offense on his soccer team, scoring the winning goal in a championship game last year. Krystle Campbell was the vivacious assistant manager of local steakhouse, the first to backstop fellow workers by running plates from the kitchen. She could instantly smooth over diners' complaints with her smile. They were both cheering on the sidelines of the Boston Marathon on Monday when two bombs went off with a thunderous boom and cloud of white smoke, claiming them as the first victims of the blast.
SPORTS
March 3, 2003
"I felt like it was kind of like David fighting Goliath--and Goliath was able to use a weapon." Jalen Rose, Chicago guard Jalen Rose, who got a chipped tooth from a Michael Jordan elbow during the Bulls' 101-93 loss to Washington on Saturday night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1991
Given the resources of the State Department, officials could have rewritten the history of civilization in eight months, let alone Glaspie's explanation of her memos to Saddam. I prefer the truth to the tooth fairy. MAX SHULDINER, Los Angeles
SCIENCE
April 3, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
The shark tooth weapons were the kind of cool stuff that drew marine conservation biologist Joshua Drew to the Field Museum of natural history in Chicago. The postdoctoral researcher was admittedly a bit burned out from a job search and the demands of a newborn child.  So Drew and his colleagues went down a floor to check out the collection of menacing swords and knives laced with dozens of shark's teeth, which once were used to hack enemies to death in the Central Pacific's Gilbert Islands.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2013 | By Shan Li
Even the tooth fairy is feeling more generous as the economy recovers. The average amount that the tooth fairy (or parents, for those who scoff at Santa and the Easter bunny) gave to kids jumped 15.2% to $2.42 last year, up from $2.10 in 2011, according to an annual poll conducted by Delta Dental. Quiz: How much do you know about California's economy? Dubbed the Original Tooth Fairy Poll, it surveyed more than 1,200 primary caregivers for the average gift bestowed upon a child who lost a tooth.
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