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Topanga State Park

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1991
In response to your article on the proposed Mulholland Drive "Gateway" Park in the Santa Monica Mountains: Why does this parkland need to be urbanized? The parkland as it now exists is well utilized by hikers, bicyclists and horseback riders without any complaints. Adequate access is currently available from the east portion of the park in addition to the main entrance to Topanga State Park. What possible "improvements" could be made to an already beautiful and unadulterated park?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1992
Councilman Marvin Braude is doing the right thing when he proposes deletion of the road from Mulholland to Sunset. He is opting to protect the residents of his district as well as the interests of the citizens-at-large from being sacrificed to the development goals of outside money. In one fell swoop, the road would facilitate development in both the San Fernando Valley and in Big Wild itself, and that is its purpose. The suggestion that this road is needed to solve local traffic problems is a red herring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1993
Well, well, well, it seems the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy wants to take yet another piece of real estate off the tax rolls and pay for it with our hard-earned tax dollars. For 17 years, I have lived a quarter mile from the property in question--the overlook south of Mulholland at Topanga Canyon Boulevard. This three-acre parcel has been for sale most of those 17 years. This land has not been developed because of an adverse bedding plane which makes building on it prohibitive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2000 | GREG RISLING
About 30 artists will be selling their work this weekend to raise money for the docent program at Topanga State Park. The third annual "Gathering of Arts," sponsored by the park docents and the Topanga Canyon Art Gallery, will offer paintings, ceramics, jewelry, handcrafted furniture and photography. Books on wildlife and hiking trails also will be available. The docents will receive 10% of the art sales and revenue from the $5 parking fee, gallery spokeswoman Nancy Williams said.
NEWS
July 31, 1988
Your story on the Palisades Presbyterian Conference grounds and the differences over what to build at the public entrance to Topanga State Park, once again points up yesterday's vision refusing to see today and tomorrow's needs. (Times, July 17). I attended a teen-age national youth convention at the same facility in 1936. Very little has changed within the conference area. The Temescal Canyon, with its high school, public facilities and easy access to the beach, was but a man-made footpath in 1936.
NEWS
October 7, 1993 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State parks officials and the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy have agreed to a land swap that clears the way for a long-anticipated decision on the future of some prized parkland in Los Liones Canyon. The arrangement calls for a 32-acre parcel on Sunset Boulevard near the Pacific Ocean to be transferred to the conservancy, but gives state parks officials the final say over what is to become of the Pacific Palisades property.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Department of Parks and Recreation completed a $43-million deal Thursday to purchase 1,659 acres in lower Topanga Canyon, extending the reach of Topanga State Park from the San Fernando Valley all the way to the sea. State officials bought the property from LAACO Ltd., owner of the Los Angeles Athletic Club, in an arrangement brokered by the American Land Conservancy in San Francisco. "It's such a wonderful purchase," said Harriet Burgess, the conservancy's president.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A conservation group has decided to buy 1,659 acres in the Santa Monica Mountains for parkland, clearing the way for the largest coastal-area acquisition there in two decades. There are spectacular ocean views in the mountainous parcel and rare species such as the horned lizard and the Santa Monica Mountains dudleya plant. It is also habitat for threatened species such as the California gnatcatcher and Braunton's milk-vetch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1991 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A developer is expected to begin extending Reseda Boulevard into Topanga State Park today despite a last-ditch attempt by state parks officials to halt the work pending an environmental review. Parks officials said Wednesday that they still hope to obtain a court order blocking road construction in the park by Harlan Lee & Associates. The company is building Mulholland Park, a large residential tract in the hills above Tarzana near the state park's northern edge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1993 | CAROL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bitter controversy over a plan to pave a route for commuters through state parkland was resurrected Thursday when advocates questioned a law designed to ban an extension of Reseda Boulevard. More than 100 people packed a Los Angeles Planning Commission meeting in Sherman Oaks, turning the discussion of a technical legal issue into a full-blown debate on the merits of parkland preservation versus traffic relief.
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