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Tori Amos

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2011
MUSIC Using a technique taken from classical music, Tori Amos has created a cycle of repeating musical themes with her latest solo work, "Night of Hunters," a beautiful kaleidoscope of remembering and letting go. Her fans will be delighted to find that "Hunters" marks the return of Amos' piano, which has taken a back seat to the electronically produced fanciness she's favored in the recent past. Here her voice is a crystal bell with only the ivory guiding her. The Orpheum, 842 S. Broadway, L.A. 8 p.m. Sat.-Sun.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2011
MUSIC Using a technique taken from classical music, Tori Amos has created a cycle of repeating musical themes with her latest solo work, "Night of Hunters," a beautiful kaleidoscope of remembering and letting go. Her fans will be delighted to find that "Hunters" marks the return of Amos' piano, which has taken a back seat to the electronically produced fanciness she's favored in the recent past. Here her voice is a crystal bell with only the ivory guiding her. The Orpheum, 842 S. Broadway, L.A. 8 p.m. Sat.-Sun.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1994
Tori Amos' performance did not appeal to Steve Hochman ("Tori Amos: Too Much Drama, Not Enough Song," March 24). He claims she made us count every one of the stars. I wasn't counting any stars. I felt I was welcomed by a warm individual who is very open about her feelings. Very little music can stand up to the test of being performed by a solo vocalist with an instrument. It is a very exposed place. At no point did she "spoil" the effect. She is gifted as a songwriter and a performer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2011 | By Marcia Adair, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Creating something genuinely new in the classical crossover genre is, for many reasons, an endeavor fraught with peril. Classical fans are notoriously unkind to pop artists who want to have a go while pop fans often attack their icons for putting on airs. Those who live full time in the genre — Andrea Bocelli, Il Divo, Blake — sell millions of records by sticking to a strict formula. Songs must have big tunes and, if at all possible, be sung in Italian; the voice must be at least vaguely operatic with lots of vibrato and the singer must be handsome in a floppy-haired, Euro kind of way. "Night of Hunters," Tori Amos' 12th studio album and first to be released on the classical music label Deutsche Grammophon, is everything that a crossover project has the potential to be but usually never is. She'll play material from the album at L.A.'s Orpheum Theater on Dec. 17 and 18. The album began with a phone call from Deutsche Grammophon executive producer Alexander Buhr.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2011 | By Marcia Adair, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Creating something genuinely new in the classical crossover genre is, for many reasons, an endeavor fraught with peril. Classical fans are notoriously unkind to pop artists who want to have a go while pop fans often attack their icons for putting on airs. Those who live full time in the genre — Andrea Bocelli, Il Divo, Blake — sell millions of records by sticking to a strict formula. Songs must have big tunes and, if at all possible, be sung in Italian; the voice must be at least vaguely operatic with lots of vibrato and the singer must be handsome in a floppy-haired, Euro kind of way. "Night of Hunters," Tori Amos' 12th studio album and first to be released on the classical music label Deutsche Grammophon, is everything that a crossover project has the potential to be but usually never is. She'll play material from the album at L.A.'s Orpheum Theater on Dec. 17 and 18. The album began with a phone call from Deutsche Grammophon executive producer Alexander Buhr.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2009 | ANN POWERS, POP MUSIC CRITIC
For veteran artists, staging a triumphant return at South by Southwest has become almost as challenging as making a memorable toast in Times Square on New Year's Eve. The streets and bars teem with humanity, everyone is bent on having the best night ever and the thousand of artists playing are like so much confetti, scattered everywhere, turning the whole scene into a blur.
NEWS
December 19, 2002 | Natalie Nichols, Special to The Times
The old saying goes that if you want to get someone's attention, whisper. But when singer-pianist Tori Amos tried that at the Universal Amphitheatre on Tuesday, she couldn't be heard above the capacity crowd's shouts of admiration. Amos, who offered only a few between-song words throughout the two hours and 15 minutes, appeared to be conserving her voice, which sounded slightly ragged the first time she spoke.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1992 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Like an Olympic diver steadying herself alone on the platform, Tori Amos took two even breaths into the microphone at the piano and prepared to leap into a set of free-falling musical and emotional contortions on Monday at the Roxy. For the next hour the enraptured audience sat breathless as it followed every intricate, practiced twist from the petite Amos as she played complex Kate Bush-Elton John-like piano and sang with psychodramatic dynamics that manifest a soul both tender and tortured.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2005 | Natalie Nichols, Special to The Times
You didn't have to be one of singer-songwriter Tori Amos' adoring fans to be moved by the way she sang her sweetly poignant "The Beekeeper" toward the end of her sold-out show Monday at UCLA's Royce Hall. The title track of her latest album created a palpable sense of worry, perhaps, that one's sleeping child won't awake or one's sick parent won't recover, then vanquished it with a powerful feeling of reassurance.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1996 | Jean Rosenbluth and New albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (excellent). and Where the 'Boys' Are and * To hear samples from "Boys for Pele," call TimesLine at 808-8463 and press *5710. and In 805 area code, call (818) 808-8463.
There are only two possible explanations for the utter indecipherability of Amos' lyrics: (1) She is an enemy spy sending brilliantly encrypted messages to her compatriots in foreign lands or (2) The Cornflake Girl is really just a flake. On her third solo album, Amos has been left almost entirely to her own devices, producing the album as well as writing its 18 songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2010 | By Ann Powers, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Warm sunlight streamed through the windows onto the gently stained wood floors of Sarah McLachlan's West Vancouver home on a recent Thursday morning. The lady of the house was in her kitchen, making truffles. "Organic raw chocolate!" she enthused, pouring the confection into a mold. Later, after saying goodbye to her yoga partner and sharing a few choice hugs with her 3-year-old daughter, Taja, the singer-songwriter would pack those sweets in Tupperware and bring them downtown to a band rehearsal for her summer tour headlining the revived Lilith.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2009 | Margaret Wappler; Mikael Wood; August Brown
Tori Amos "Abnormally Attracted to Sin" Universal Republic Records * * * From the blood-soaked opening thumps of "Abnormally Attracted to Sin," it's obvious that Tori Amos is still the reigning muse for mystic goth girls. The new 17-song collection strikes a balance between Victorian-inspired decadence, mythical pathos and arch camp. For all her theatrics, Amos is also the warm and wise sister-goddess, passing on advice she's learned the hard way.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2009 | Denise Martin
You better talk about: "Glee" Why? It's only the best thing you're going to see on broadcast television all year. Try to resist the story of a group of high school glee club misfits as told by "Nip/Tuck" creator Ryan Murphy. It's more "Election" than "High School Musical" -- the big production number is set to Amy Winehouse's blackout ode "Rehab." (Tuesday) -- You could talk about: "The Girlfriend Experience" . . . if you like Steven Soderbergh. Art-house Soderbergh.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2009 | ANN POWERS, POP MUSIC CRITIC
For veteran artists, staging a triumphant return at South by Southwest has become almost as challenging as making a memorable toast in Times Square on New Year's Eve. The streets and bars teem with humanity, everyone is bent on having the best night ever and the thousand of artists playing are like so much confetti, scattered everywhere, turning the whole scene into a blur.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2007 | Mikael Wood, Special to The Times
It's unlikely that any major artist has done more to complicate confessional singer-songwriter music than Tori Amos. When she emerged in 1992 with "Little Earthquakes" -- her solo debut following a stillborn effort by a glam-pop group unfortunately named Y Kant Tori Read -- Amos set her tales of sexual alienation against stark piano-based arrangements that emphasized the raw honesty of her writing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2007 | Natalie Nichols; Serena Kim; Steve Hochman
Tori Amos "American Doll Posse" (Epic) * * * 1/2 THE singular mind of Tori Amos actually consists of many parts. On her ninth studio album, the singer-songwriter gives voice (and name and affect) to some of them, aiming to inspire all women to reclaim their whole selves rather than be limited to the roles (wife, mother, sexpot, etc.) that patriarchy has imposed for, well, forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1998 | Sara Scribner
Is she a high-boil Kate Bush rip-off or a true renegade--a singer-pianist unafraid to cavort with fairies and howl with wolves? Sometimes Amos is simply both, someone capable of terrific, swooping highs and ungodly, muck-wallowing lows, a woman whose fever either mesmerizes or embarrasses. Before Fiona, there was Tori Amos: strong, passionate, womanly and weird.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1994 | STEVE HOCHMAN
"There are too many stars and not enough sky," sang Tori Amos during her show on Tuesday at the Wadsworth Theater. The line is from "The Waitress," a sketchy song about fighting the urge toward vengeful anger, but it could be a description of the maddening nature of Amos' own artistry.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2005 | Natalie Nichols, Special to The Times
You didn't have to be one of singer-songwriter Tori Amos' adoring fans to be moved by the way she sang her sweetly poignant "The Beekeeper" toward the end of her sold-out show Monday at UCLA's Royce Hall. The title track of her latest album created a palpable sense of worry, perhaps, that one's sleeping child won't awake or one's sick parent won't recover, then vanquished it with a powerful feeling of reassurance.
NEWS
December 19, 2002 | Natalie Nichols, Special to The Times
The old saying goes that if you want to get someone's attention, whisper. But when singer-pianist Tori Amos tried that at the Universal Amphitheatre on Tuesday, she couldn't be heard above the capacity crowd's shouts of admiration. Amos, who offered only a few between-song words throughout the two hours and 15 minutes, appeared to be conserving her voice, which sounded slightly ragged the first time she spoke.
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