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Tori Amos

ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2001 | STEVE HOCHMAN
It may seem as if everyone has weighed in on the debate about Eminem, from politicians attacking the Detroit rapper to Elton John singing with him on the Grammys. But when Tori Amos listened to Eminem's " '97 Bonnie and Clyde"--the notorious narrative of a man who has killed his wife--she thought one voice was missing: that of the song's murdered woman. Amos decided to address the issue with her own version of the song, sung in character as the victim.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Divas may be high-strung and demanding, but they earn the right and the title with the intensity and accomplishment of their music. Tori Amos claimed the diva's prerogative to have things her way Friday as she opened a sold-out, two-night stand at the Coach House. Operating under Tori rules instead of the usual house rules, the Coach House was banned from running its bar or offering table service during Amos' performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1998 | SANDY MASUO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When musicians shift from nightclub tours to arenas, it's usually to accommodate an increasing fan base. And although Tori Amos has certainly attracted growing numbers of fans over the past few years, her decision to take the plunge into large venues in support of her current album, "From the Choirgirl Hotel," has as much to do with the expanding horizons of her music as her enthusiastic following.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1992 | ERIK HAMILTON
Apologizing profusely for being tardy for an interview, Tori Amos explained that she's been feeling a bit run down lately. "It's been a bit grueling," the 29-year-old North Carolina native said, referring to the 60-date concert tour she's been on since last October. "From a physical level, I'm beaten. But I'll shake it off. And by show time, I'll be pumping."
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tori Amos, the Princess of Pain on Piano, will fill the Arlington Theater in Santa Barbara on Sunday night. Amos, with the Peg Bundy red hair and a much stronger work ethic, is touring in support of her second album, "Under the Pink." Born Myra Ellen Amos on Aug. 22, 1963, to a strict Methodist minister in North Carolina, she was a child prodigy on piano.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1992 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tori Amos was "sexually and violently violated" seven years ago, but it was only last August that the singer-songwriter was able to confront the experience. It took "Thelma & Louise" to break her through. "Something happened when Susan Sarandon killed (the rapist)," Amos says. "Something incredibly freeing happened. Freeing in the sense that I felt as if she were my voice. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Orange County concert-goers first made acquaintance with Tori Amos six years ago, they met an exacting artist who wouldn't brook any breaches of what she saw as the proper etiquette for a performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2007 | Mikael Wood, Special to The Times
It's unlikely that any major artist has done more to complicate confessional singer-songwriter music than Tori Amos. When she emerged in 1992 with "Little Earthquakes" -- her solo debut following a stillborn effort by a glam-pop group unfortunately named Y Kant Tori Read -- Amos set her tales of sexual alienation against stark piano-based arrangements that emphasized the raw honesty of her writing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1996 | Elysa Gardner, Elysa Gardner is a freelance writer based in New York
You would probably expect a woman who lists Mary Magdalene and Lady Macbeth among her role models to harbor some serious femme fatale fantasies. And if that woman is as intense as Tori Amos, you would expect her to relate those fantasies in a colorful fashion. Discussing her new Atlantic Records album, "Boys for Pele," over dinner in a mid-town Manhattan restaurant, Amos doesn't disappoint.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1994 | CHRIS WILLMAN, Chris Willman is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
If they ever want to do a modern-day remake of "The Piano," Tori Amos is their woman. And not just because she says in all earnestness that through most of her life the instrument has been her "lifeline," or because she proves it repeatedly by packing her old-fashioned instrument back and forth on journeys between her apartment in England and her boyfriend's in New York. It's not so much the packing logistics as the sensibilities--personal intensity, resentment of religion, pride in sexuality, a near-spousal attachment to her 88s--that make it seem as if maybe writer-director Jane Campion picked Amos' brain.
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