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Toronto Blue Jays

SPORTS
October 21, 1993 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who in the crowd of 62,731 knew what was in store for them on a chilly, rainy, wind-swept Wednesday evening at Veterans Stadium? Who could have predicted it would be a World Series game of bad phones, falling walls, failing bullpens and bloody chins. A 4-hour 14-minute eternity when 24 runs would score through seven innings, and 29 through nine, the most in Series history.
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SPORTS
October 20, 1993 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why it took Toronto Manager Cito Gaston so long to announce if he would play Paul Molitor is anybody's guess. He knew, he said, but he wanted to cause reporter's stomachs to churn, as they make his churn sometimes. What's a manager to do when he has too many good hitters and no place to play them? Gaston told American League batting champion John Olerud that he was benched for Tuesday night's Game 3.
SPORTS
October 19, 1993 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Fregosi lives in a hotel across the street from the ballpark. It's not a fancy establishment by any means, but he has two rooms, a refrigerator, and he gets ESPN. "What more can a person want?" he asks. He eats most of his meals in the hotel coffee shop and normally walks in silence across the vacant parking lot to work. But on this day, a cold, blustery Philadelphia morning, thousands of fans are lined up outside Veterans Stadium to buy tickets to see his team play in the World Series.
SPORTS
October 20, 1993 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Phillies giggled at the commotion created by the Toronto Blue Jays. They snickered at all of the confusion over Who's at first, What's at second, and I don't know at third. Why, with the way the Blue Jays were acting Tuesday, the Phillies wondered if their American League counterparts would even be able to play the game, so despondent were they over not being allowed to use a designated hitter in Philadelphia.
SPORTS
October 21, 1993 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was like a slo-pitch softball game played by overweight men trying to recapture their youth in a Sunday beer league. Losers buy the suds. Winners put up the quarters for the dart game. The only difference Wednesday night was that this was a bona fide World Series game, played allegedly between the best two teams in all of North America, while a nationwide audience sat home with mouths agape.
SPORTS
October 22, 1993 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a parking lot full of mud-stained Jeeps, trucks and Blazers at Veterans Stadium, there is a dazzling red Lamborghini, with every option available to mankind. It stands out like a cold bottle of Heineken sitting on a shelf with cans of Pabst Blue Ribbon. It's like a pin-striped Armani suit on a rack of Sears plaid leisure suits.
SPORTS
October 22, 1993 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The question made Jim Fregosi throw his head back and laugh, and the answer was even better. "Will you use Curt Schilling in Game 5 until his arm falls off?" somebody asked the Philadelphia manager. When he finished laughing, Fregosi answered: "Most likely." Then a pause. "Maybe more." Every game Schilling pitches seems to involve added incentive, and he didn't need any extra Thursday night.
SPORTS
October 22, 1992 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The team that used to wobble under the slightest hint of pressure, led by the manager whose professional head was demanded after he lost the first game of the American League playoffs, moved within one game of its first World Series championship Wednesday.
SPORTS
October 21, 1992 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This was about redemption for the Toronto Blue Jays. The redeemed included third baseman Kelly Gruber, ending a record postseason hitless streak with a game-tying home run; catcher Pat Borders, throwing out an Atlanta runner after watching 25 base stealers run safely by; and left fielder Candy Maldonado, refusing to be embarrassed a third time after two Jeff Reardon curveballs burned him for strikes with the bases loaded and one out in the ninth inning Tuesday night.
SPORTS
October 25, 1992 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Blue Jays drag their weary bodies past a customs officer at the Toronto airport this morning, they will get a question that is asked every minute. They will give an answer they have been working on for 16 years. Anything to declare? "Yes. A World Series championship." After spending more than four hours battling with the Atlanta Braves, after overcoming miracles and avoiding heartbreaks, they can also declare that they deserved it.
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