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Torrance Ca Ordinances

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1996
Missing out on the three Rs just got a little more expensive for students who cut classes in Torrance. The city passed an ordinance last week allowing police officers to detain students found loitering between 8:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on school days in parks, playgrounds, streets, restaurants or public places. If a parent doesn't retrieve them or the students aren't returned to school within one hour, the students or their parents will have to pay a $57 fine. The new law goes on the books May 2.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1996
Missing out on the three Rs just got a little more expensive for students who cut classes in Torrance. The city passed an ordinance last week allowing police officers to detain students found loitering between 8:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on school days in parks, playgrounds, streets, restaurants or public places. If a parent doesn't retrieve them or the students aren't returned to school within one hour, the students or their parents will have to pay a $57 fine. The new law goes on the books May 2.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1995
They've grown accustomed to their tax. Three years ago, Torrance homeowners were up in arms over a $25-a-year tax increase to maintain school property. This week, without so much as a peep from residents, the Torrance Unified School District voted unanimously to extend the maintenance assessment district for one more year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1996
In the past, the price students at Torrance public schools paid for skipping class was primarily educational--missed lectures, labs and perhaps a failing grade. The new price is 57 bucks. Under a new anti-truancy ordinance passed this week by the City Council, police officers will be authorized to cite students younger than 18 who are absent from school without a valid excuse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1988
To applause from area homeowners, the Torrance City Council unanimously denied a Delaware-based company's request to extract 27 million barrels of oil from beneath a southeast Torrance neighborhood. The council late Tuesday rejected the proposal by Kelt Energy Inc. to drill 108 slanted wells from a 2.2-acre site to collect oil beneath an adjoining 560-acre area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1988
Among the strongest images of the year in Los Angeles County were those of furious smokers temporarily banned from Beverly Hills restaurants and a would-be gunman holding what turned out to be a toy gun on consumer reporter David Horowitz during a live broadcast. Both incidents spawned action by local authorities. Here's a sampling of what local legislative boards decided during 1987.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1996
In the past, the price students at Torrance public schools paid for skipping class was primarily educational--missed lectures, labs and perhaps a failing grade. The new price is 57 bucks. Under a new anti-truancy ordinance passed this week by the City Council, police officers will be authorized to cite students younger than 18 who are absent from school without a valid excuse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1995
They've grown accustomed to their tax. Three years ago, Torrance homeowners were up in arms over a $25-a-year tax increase to maintain school property. This week, without so much as a peep from residents, the Torrance Unified School District voted unanimously to extend the maintenance assessment district for one more year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1988
To applause from area homeowners, the Torrance City Council unanimously denied a Delaware-based company's request to extract 27 million barrels of oil from beneath a southeast Torrance neighborhood. The council late Tuesday rejected the proposal by Kelt Energy Inc. to drill 108 slanted wells from a 2.2-acre site to collect oil beneath an adjoining 560-acre area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1988
Among the strongest images of the year in Los Angeles County were those of furious smokers temporarily banned from Beverly Hills restaurants and a would-be gunman holding what turned out to be a toy gun on consumer reporter David Horowitz during a live broadcast. Both incidents spawned action by local authorities. Here's a sampling of what local legislative boards decided during 1987.
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