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Torture Victims

NEWS
April 20, 1994 | Reuters
Authorities have discovered the remains of 15 victims of apparent torture and summary execution buried at least a year ago along Venezuela's border with Colombia, officials said Tuesday. A regional police chief was detained in connection with the discovery on suspicion that he ordered the killings because of the victims' suspected links with Colombian guerrillas, the officials said.
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NATIONAL
July 9, 2003 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge has awarded nearly $1 billion in damages to a group of American soldiers and their families who sued Saddam Hussein, the Republic of Iraq and the Iraqi intelligence service for torture they endured while imprisoned during the 1991 Gulf War. The award -- to 17 former POWs who U.S. District Judge Richard W.
WORLD
January 27, 2007 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Canada's prime minister apologized and offered $8.9 million in compensation Friday to Maher Arar, a Canadian software engineer who, based on incorrect information, was deported by U.S. officials to Syria in 2002, where he was imprisoned and tortured for a year. After being identified by Canadian police as an Islamic extremist in faulty intelligence shared with U.S. authorities, Arar was detained by American agents during a stopover at New York's John F. Kennedy Airport.
NEWS
May 27, 1987 | Associated Press
Klaus Barbie returned to the courtroom against his will Tuesday to face five of his alleged victims, but he refused to respond as each identified him as the man who tortured and deported them during World War II. "I am here illegally and here by force," the pale and defiant former Nazi Gestapo chief of Lyon told the court's three judges and nine-member jury during the 25-minute confrontation. "And, as judicially I am absent, I will not answer."
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles federal judge has frozen $320 million in Swiss and Hong Kong bank accounts that were secretly set up by late Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos. U.S. District Judge Manuel L. Real imposed the freeze last week after lawyers representing Philippine torture victims in a lawsuit persuaded the judge that the money might be spent by Marcos' widow and children before the suit concludes.
WORLD
December 13, 2003 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
A new day dawns over the sleepy neighborhood known as Muhallah 665. The dappled sunlight, pink in the dusty haze, casts long shadows over houses with grandiose touches -- a high arch here, a Doric column there, a balustraded balcony. Before the war, this neighborhood of northwest Baghdad was a well-ordered enclave where favors and privileges went hand in hand with support -- obsequious, often humiliating support -- for Saddam Hussein. An elaborate system of rewards and punishments prevailed.
NEWS
October 30, 1999 | RUTH MORRIS and JUANITA DARLING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A man who posed as a monk or charity worker to gain the confidence of his young victims has confessed to torturing, raping and murdering about 140 children during a five-year, nationwide killing spree in Colombia, authorities said Friday. The confession appears to end an investigation into serial killings that have shocked this nation, despite Colombians' frequent exposure to massacres linked to a prolonged civil war and to slayings related to the illegal drug trade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1999 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 21-year-old man who stabbed a female acquaintance 100 times in her Van Nuys apartment was convicted Wednesday of torture murder, which could send him to prison for life. Deputy Dist. Atty. Jeffrey Boxer said he suspects Travis Bone sneaked into Cindy Fry's house and killed her after a failed rape attempt, but said he could not prove it. Bone, who was living in Sherman Oaks in September 1997 when the attack took place, was dating the sister of Fry's boyfriend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1999 | NANCY WRIDE and PHIL WILLON and NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Richard W. Willsey may have planned to kidnap his estranged wife and her boyfriend from their La Habra rental home and take them to the desert to torture and kill them, authorities said Tuesday. Instead, the 60-year-old trucker ambushed them after dawn Monday and gunned them down before he shot himself in their living room, police said.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2010 | By David G. Savage
Barre Yousuf, a Somali businessman living in the state of Georgia, spent much of the 1980s in a small, dark and windowless cell in Somalia. "I was tortured with an electric shock and waterboarded," he said. At other times, military police subjected him to what the Somali regime called the "Mig." He was forced to lie on his stomach with his arms and legs tied behind him, while a heavy rock was placed on his back. In this painful position, the victim's body was said to resemble the swept-back wings of a Mig fighter jet. Yousuf recounted his ordeal Wednesday outside the Supreme Court, where the justices for the first time considered whether victims of torture or state-sponsored murder can sue the responsible officials under a 1991 law designed to give victims and family members a chance to get recompense for their suffering.
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