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Torture

WORLD
May 24, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
The broad-daylight hacking death of a soldier in London this week was Britain's Marathon Moment. Like the twin bombings at the race finish line in Boston last month, Wednesday's attack by two machete-wielding men spouting venomous threats to avenge Muslim deaths in faraway wars was a sobering reminder that terror now lurks in the hearts of local youth and on ordinary streets and sidewalks. The suspects in both cases are young men accorded the benefits of education and personal freedoms, raising perplexing questions of how seemingly integrated immigrants come to be radicalized to act in the name of a remote, embattled homeland.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer, This post has been corrected. See note below for details.
Two Palmdale parents were being questioned after an 8-year-old boy with injuries consistent with torture was found not breathing, sheriff's officials said Thursday. The L.A. County Sheriff's Department in Palmdale received a call about 11:50 p.m. Wednesday about the residence on the 200 block of East Avenue Q-10, Deputy John Cereoli said. The boy was taken to Children's Hospital Los Angeles, where he was in critical condition. His injuries included burn marks and ligature marks from restraint.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
Spoiler alert! "Scandal" is the most cynical show on television. No seriously, don't read any further if you care about what happened on Thursday night's finale but disobeyed the directive to watch it in real time. Because for weeks now, creator Shonda Rhimes has been warning her "gladiator" fans that if they missed watching the final five minutes in "real time," they'd be kicking themselves all summer. One assumes she is referring to the big "What's Up Doc?" rip-off of a final scene in which Olivia (Kerry Washington)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2013 | By Kate Mather
A Garden Grove woman was found guilty Monday of torture and aggravated mayhem after allegations that she drugged her estranged husband, tied him to a bed, cut off his penis and threw it in a garbage disposal. Catherine Kieu, 50, also was convicted of a sentencing enhancement for the personal use of a knife, the Orange County district attorney's office said. She faces a maximum possible sentence of life in prison and is scheduled to be sentenced June 28. Kieu was arrested the night of July 11, 2011, after she and her 60-year-old husband -- whose name has not been released -- apparently argued about the possibility of a friend staying at their home, prosecutors said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Jean-Luc Godard made his second feature film, "Le Petit Soldat," in 1960, but it was banned until 1963 because of its tough look at the then-current French-Algerian conflict and unblinking portrayal of torture. Opening Friday at the Nuart in a new 35-millimeter print with fresh translation and subtitles, the often-overlooked film provides a lens through which to view the French director's unparalleled streak of provocation and productivity in the 1960s, as well as a startlingly contemporary-feeling counterpoint to recent politically tinged war films such as "Zero Dark Thirty.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is a chilling resonance in watching “Le Petit Soldat,” Jean-Luc Godard's classic story of love and allegiance that begins a special one-week run at the Nuart Theatre in West Los Angeles on Friday with a newly remastered print and enhanced subtitles. Its political intrigues entangled with a love story, Godard used the movie as a way to discuss his own take on the rumors of government torture of those who supported the Algerian insurrection against French occupation. Due to be released in 1960, the politically sensitive film was banned in France until 1963, roughly a year after the Algerian war of independence had ended and the reports of torture of insurgents and innocents alike lingered like a dark shadow over the country.
WORLD
April 21, 2013 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT - Syrian government security forces and paramilitaries killed dozens of people, many of them civilians, in a five-day battle for a Damascus suburb, rebel activists and a pro-opposition nongovernmental organization said Sunday. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, considered close to the opposition, said at least 80 people had been killed in the fighting in Jdeidat al Fadel, a suburb of Damascus, the capital. The British-based organization said the dead included three children, six women and 71 men, of whom 19 were fighters.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
According to a new book about the world of network morning shows, ousted "Today" show co-host Ann Curry described her final days regularly appearing on the show as "professional torture. " An excerpt of the book "Top of the Morning: Inside the Cutthroat World of Morning TV," by New York Times reporter Brian Stelter, appearing in the New York Times Magazine, says the main person behind Curry's ouster was "Today" executive producer Jim Bell, who called his plan to get rid of Curry "Operation Bambi.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - U.S. courts will not be the world forum for lawsuits brought by victims of human rights abuses abroad who seek damages from multinational corporations or deposed tyrants, the Supreme Court declared Wednesday. In a decision welcomed by corporate leaders and decried by human rights activists, the justices said U.S. courts are limited mostly to deciding disputes over conduct that took place on American territory, not on foreign soil. By a 9-0 vote, the high court tossed out a closely watched lawsuit brought by Nigerians against Royal Dutch Petroleum for allegedly conspiring with the Nigerian regime in a campaign of rape, torture and murder in the oil-rich delta in the early 1990s.
NATIONAL
April 16, 2013
NEW YORK - An independent review of the U.S. government's anti-terrorism response after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks found that it was "indisputable" the U.S. engaged in torture and the George W. Bush administration bore responsibility. The report released Tuesday by the Constitution Project, a nonpartisan think tank in Washington, is an ambitious review of the Bush administration's approach to the problems of holding and interrogating detainees after the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon.
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