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MAGAZINE
May 12, 1991
After weeks of anticipation, mere words cannot adequately express how totally underwhelmed I am with your new format. RICHARD V. GROGAN Oceanside
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
Heather Graham - she of Rollergirl fame - is the latest actress to call out Hollywood on its sexism. "Girls" wunderkind Lena Dunham and Oscar winner Cate Blanchett have also made statements on the topic of sexism recently, with the former addressing it in a SXSW panel and the latter bringing it up during her Oscars acceptance speech in March. The "Boogie Nights" star made her fiery statements during a recent Q&A with Esquire magazine that surveyed the actress' characters as of late - roles that cast her as the perennial "sexy mother" in films such as "The Hangover" trilogy (she was in the first and third installments)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1988
I am totally in favor of what the Cultural Foundation intends to build for an Arts Park. Mrs. J.E. METSCHAN Calabasas
BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - It's not difficult to get a bonus if you work for the Internal Revenue Service - even if you haven't paid your own taxes. The IRS handed out a total of nearly $1.1 million in bonuses in a 27-month period to more than 1,146 employees who had been disciplined for failing to pay taxes, according to an inspector general's report. "This is outrageous," said Rep. Sam Johnson (R-Texas). "The IRS is essentially telling its employees: Break the law and we will reward you. " The employees were among more than 2,800 at the agency who received performance awards within one year of disciplinary action, such as suspensions or written reprimands for drug use, filing fraudulent time sheets or other misconduct, the report found.
NEWS
May 1, 1988
In the article "Colorism," statements about the Newell family and quotations attributed to them were taken totally out of context. THE JAMES NEWELL FAMILY Riverside
SPORTS
October 27, 1990
Although the A's were totally outplayed when swept by the Reds, they still insist they are not the second-best team in baseball. I'm in total agreement. The Pirates are the second-best team. At least they made the Reds play six. BERNIE LAMAS Newbury Park
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2001
Thank you for that sobering and incisive assessment of John Ashcroft's nomination for attorney general ("The Conscience of a Pentecostal," by Martin E. Marty, Opinion, Jan. 28). I too am an evangelical Christian committed to scriptural truths and commands. Thus I find it breathtakingly appalling that Ashcroft is so power-hungry he would willingly subscribe to enforcing laws he declares he finds totally unscriptural and abhorrent. Either this means he is intending to change or subvert those laws--or has no moral convictions whatever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1995
Last month I received bad news. I was informed that the U.S.Treasury Department would not allow me to attend the 7th Annual Conference of North American and Cuban Philosophers and Social Scientists, to be held in Havana, June 12-26. My application, complete with my rationale and curriculum vitae, was accepted by the conference. That same application was not accepted by the Treasury Department. When I told numerous friends that the "United States forbids my going to Cuba," they were astounded!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1986
So the Navy has decided to allow its athletic standouts to participate in professional football on a "not-to-interfere" or "no-conflict" basis with their "regular" duties. This is an unfortunate decision--for us taxpayers. These young men, ostensibly screened for their intellect and leadership potential, have been given, at taxpayers' expense, a comprehensive education. This should have prepared and motivated them to serve as totally committed Navy and Marine officers, not as "part time now" and "full time later on" football players.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | ELAINE KENDALL
Fabulous Nobodies by Lee Tulloch (William Morrow: $16.95; 288 pages) Although the editors of this section make a heroic effort to match reviewers to books, sometimes they have to settle for less than perfection. Where do you find a critic in sympathy with idea that "people would be a lot happier if they talked to their clothes more often"--one who could also appreciate the style of a novelist who uses the word frock an average of five times per page? Given these impossible parameters, you might just draw straws.
SCIENCE
April 16, 2014 | Deborah Netburn and Alicia Banks
They came with iPhones, iPads, digital cameras and even some film cameras -- ready to capture the total lunar eclipse known as a "blood moon. " Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles offered a prime view, and hundreds of people were there when the eclipse began at 10:58 p.m. Monday. The full moon was beginning to move into Earth's shadow, leaving the impression that someone had taken a bite out of it. As the minutes passed, the shadow spread across more and more of the lunar surface.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
The crowd packed on the grassy lawn of Griffith Observatory erupted in whistles, cheers and howls shortly before 12:05 a.m. on Tuesday as a darkened moon transformed into an orange "blood moon" for the start of a total lunar eclipse. Visitors scrambled toward the front of the observatory, pointing up at the reddening moon. Telescopes dotting the lawn pointed upward and southward, as the moon hovered above. Around 11 p.m., a "bite" began to spread across the moon as the Earth blocked direct light from the sun, casting a shadow on the moon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By a Los Angeles Times staff writer
  Monday's "blood moon" total lunar eclipse was the first in more than three years to be visible from Los Angeles and uninterrupted by sunrise. Hundreds flocked to Griffith Observatory, cameras, cellphones and iPads at the ready to see the rare event. Some came hours before the lunar spectacle, but a hush fell over the balconies and grassy lawn as the eclipse began and onlookers jockeyed for prime viewing spots.  In Los Angeles , the most impressive part began about 11 p.m. when the first "bite" was taken out of the moon.
SCIENCE
April 14, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Sky watchers, get ready! There is a total eclipse of the moon coming Monday night and you don't want to miss it. A lunar eclipse occurs when the sun, moon, and Earth align so that  Earth's shadow falls across the moon's surface. Monday night's lunar eclipse is a total eclipse, which means  Earth's shadow will cover the moon completely. The moon won't be blacked out by our planet's shadow. Instead, it will take on a reddish hue -- anywhere from a bright copper to the brownish red of dried blood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By A Times Staff Writer
The first total eclipse of 2014 tonight and Tuesday morning is generating much attention. Times reporter Rong-Gong Lin II answers your questions about the so-called blood moon. Q: Will L.A. be able to see this eclipse? It will be the first in more than three years to be visible from Los Angeles and uninterrupted by sunrise. The last one began the evening of Dec. 20, 2010, with the eclipse's peak at 12:17 a.m. Dec. 21, according to the observatory. Q: When is the best time to watch?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Alicia Banks
Officials at the Griffith Observatory are expecting big crowds for the dark red "blood moon," the first total eclipse of 2014 beginning Monday night. The observatory will be open for visitors, who can look up at the eclipse either from the building itself or from the grass and sidewalk areas. Experts will also provide presentations on the eclipse. The hours of operation are 7 p.m. to 1:45 a.m. It is also expected that people will flock to other areas where they can see the eclipse, including mountain and desert areas with less light pollution.
BOOKS
November 12, 1989
It has been my habit since it was first published to pluck the Book Review Section from every Sunday Times, to savor in bed during the precious pre-sleep hours during the week, clipping reviews of appealing books as I go. While I went through October without clipping any reviews, I recently arrived at (oh, joy!) your Oct. 8 issue. My "want-list" from that issue sets a new record. All of the books have common appeals to me: 1. The reviewers enjoyed the books, and wrote with enthusiasm about them.
SPORTS
August 7, 1994 | STEVE WILSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ten years ago, a spunky sprite with a 1,000-watt smile and a girl-next-door name, Mary Lou Retton, vaulted from the Los Angeles Olympics across television screens into the homes of millions of Americans who fell in love with her. Sweet 16, 4-feet-9, a red-white-and-blue, stars-and-stripes ball spinning through the air, she made an entire country cheer on Aug. 3, 1984, when she landed firmly on her feet and flung up her arms, absolutely sure of a perfect 10 that gave her the first U.S.
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