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WORLD
March 22, 2012 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
French investigators Thursday were trying to establish whether a gunman killed by police after a 32-hour siege had accomplices still at large or was a lone assassin acting out his own bitter agenda. They also want to determine how Mohamed Merah, 23, amassed an arsenal of weapons while reportedly under surveillance by France's intelligence services after he spent time with Islamic extremists in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Merah, who police say confessed to gunning down seven people in a nine-day rampage and told them he was linked to a fringe Al Qaeda group, died late Thursday morning with a shot to the head after battling the French equivalent of a SWAT team.
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WORLD
November 5, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Unknown masterpieces by artists such as Marc Chagall and Henri Matisse, works thought lost to the ravages of war and others deemed "degenerate" or looted by the Nazis form part of the spectacular trove of art discovered by German authorities in the apartment of an elderly recluse in Munich. Two days after news of the find broke, officials in southern Germany revealed Tuesday that the hoard contains 1,406 pieces by masters whose names read like a who's who of Western art of the last 150 years: Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, Gustave Courbet, Oskar Kokoschka, Emil Nolde.
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WORLD
March 21, 2012 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
A standoff with a gunman deemed France's public enemy No. 1 after he claimed responsibility for three shootings that left seven people dead entered its second day Thursday as heavily armed police tried to extricate the suspect from a barricaded apartment in Toulouse. Elite SWAT-style officers had cordoned off the four-story building and spent more than 24 hours trying to persuade 23-year-old Mohamed Merah to surrender after he boasted of a 10-day terrorist rampage that left three Jewish children, a rabbi and three French paratroopers dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2013 | By Hugh Hart
Some 120 years after Toulouse-Lautrec's Moulin Rouge posters surfaced on the lamp posts and kiosks of Paris, street artists reinvigorated by the antique charms of gluepot and paper are dipping into buckets of mix-it-yourself wheat paste to plaster supersized graphics on urban surfaces around the world. The international paste-up revival, documented in "It's a Stick-Up" (Laurence King), features "wheaties" from San Francisco, Los Angeles, London, Berlin, Paris, Beijing, Brooklyn, Turin, Italy, and São Paulo, Brazil.
NEWS
June 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of people were evacuated from southern France and the Pyrenees Mountains over the weekend, after violent rains and snowstorms caused flooding and a bus accident that left at least one person dead Sunday. Rains had mostly stopped Sunday, but hundreds of homes were left without electricity. France's national power company, EDF, was working to restore power to 700 homes in the southeastern Rhone-Alps region.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Airbus, the world's largest maker of commercial aircraft, received 79% fewer orders in September compared with a year earlier amid a slowdown in demand from airlines. Customers signed contracts last month for 29 planes, compared with 141 orders a year earlier. Orders from Jan. 1 to Sept. 30 fell 13% to 737 aircraft, Toulouse, France-based Airbus said. Airbus has a full-year order target of 850 aircraft. Chief Executive Tom Enders said July 12 that as much as 27% of Airbus' backlog might be lost if airlines cancel contracts.
SPORTS
June 20, 1998
FRANCE From L'Equipe, on the ticket scandals: "In this affair where everything is messed up [the swindlers, the black market, tour operators, federations, etc.], one thing seems evident: Despite the numbers cited here or there, no one knows how many supporters were really fleeced. "[Thursday] it was 15,000 tickets and more than 3 million francs that were stolen in Paris from an American tour operator. Tomorrow, it will surely be something else. . . .
NEWS
April 15, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Jean-Baptiste Doumeng, an outspoken Communist who amassed a fortune trading French agriculture products with Eastern Bloc nations, has died at his home in southwestern France, his company reported last week. France's "Red billionaire" was 68. Doumeng joined the French Communist Party as a teen-age farm boy and remained a staunch supporter while building an agribusiness empire, selling massive quantities of subsidized European Economic Community surplus foodstuffs abroad.
NEWS
April 14, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Jean-Baptiste Doumeng, an outspoken Communist who amassed a fortune trading French agriculture products with Eastern Bloc nations, has died at his home in southwestern France, his company reported last week. France's "red billionaire" was 68. Doumeng joined the French Communist Party as a teen-age farm boy and remained a staunch supporter while building an agribusiness empire, selling massive quantities of subsidized European Economic Community surplus foodstuffs abroad.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1992
"In its prolonged romp through the (eighteen-) '80s and '90s, Paris scarcely knew what it was excited about," wrote cultural historian Roger Shattuck in his book "The Banquet Years," published in 1955. "Was it a liberation? A revolution? A victory? A last fling? A first debauch? Amid the externals of funerals and fashions, the city knew only that it was having a good time and making a superb spectacle of itself."
WORLD
November 9, 2012 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
PARIS - The older brother of a French militant who killed seven people early this year before being shot to death by police has spoken out against his family in a new book, condemning what he describes as a childhood of hatred, anti-Semitism and violence. Abdelghani Merah, 36, is the brother of Mohamed Merah, 23, who in the name of Islamic extremism shot to death three Jewish children, a rabbi and three soldiers in and around Toulouse in March. The killings have come to be seen here as part of a broader threat of home-grown terrorism.
WORLD
March 22, 2012 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
French investigators Thursday were trying to establish whether a gunman killed by police after a 32-hour siege had accomplices still at large or was a lone assassin acting out his own bitter agenda. They also want to determine how Mohamed Merah, 23, amassed an arsenal of weapons while reportedly under surveillance by France's intelligence services after he spent time with Islamic extremists in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Merah, who police say confessed to gunning down seven people in a nine-day rampage and told them he was linked to a fringe Al Qaeda group, died late Thursday morning with a shot to the head after battling the French equivalent of a SWAT team.
WORLD
March 21, 2012 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
A standoff with a gunman deemed France's public enemy No. 1 after he claimed responsibility for three shootings that left seven people dead entered its second day Thursday as heavily armed police tried to extricate the suspect from a barricaded apartment in Toulouse. Elite SWAT-style officers had cordoned off the four-story building and spent more than 24 hours trying to persuade 23-year-old Mohamed Merah to surrender after he boasted of a 10-day terrorist rampage that left three Jewish children, a rabbi and three French paratroopers dead.
WORLD
March 15, 2012 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
Three members of a French parachute regiment were gunned down Thursday in a busy town center in southwestern France by an assassin on a scooter. It was the second drive-by shooting of French soldiers in less than a week, leading investigators to fear military personnel were being targeted. The three soldiers, all in uniforms, were standing by a bank ATM machine in the town of Montauban when the gunman opened fire shortly after 2 p.m. Two of the men, 24 and 26 years old, were killed instantly; the third, age 28, was in critical condition in a hospital Thursday night.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Airbus, the world's largest maker of commercial aircraft, received 79% fewer orders in September compared with a year earlier amid a slowdown in demand from airlines. Customers signed contracts last month for 29 planes, compared with 141 orders a year earlier. Orders from Jan. 1 to Sept. 30 fell 13% to 737 aircraft, Toulouse, France-based Airbus said. Airbus has a full-year order target of 850 aircraft. Chief Executive Tom Enders said July 12 that as much as 27% of Airbus' backlog might be lost if airlines cancel contracts.
SPORTS
July 13, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A review of what happened Saturday and a look at what to expect in today's stage: Saturday's stage: A 107.2-mile, mostly flat ride from Figeac to Toulouse, the final part of which took place in heavy rain. Winner: Mark Cavendish of Britain and Team Columbia won his second stage in four days. Teammate Gerald Ciolek of Germany was second, with Jimmy Casper of France third.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Wearing a black gown topped with a provocative pink-and-white-print bodice, pianist Brigitte Engerer, arrived on the Royce Hall stage Wednesday looking stunning. She played stunningly, too, though her concerto was all-too-familiar. As soloist with the touring Orchestre du Capitole de Toulouse, Engerer brought to Saint-Saens' G-minor Concerto all the strength, evenness of technique and machine-gun rapidity it needs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2009 | Larry Gordon
The gray-and-green warehouse in suburban Concord seems an unlikely headquarters for a statewide detective operation, and the fact checkers at work there insist they are not mercilessly probing the lives of California's teenagers. Still, there is an element of hard-boiled sleuthing in the University of California's unusual attempt to ensure that its 98,000 freshman applicants tell the truth about themselves and their extracurricular activities.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2005 | Stanley Meisler, Special to The Times
IN the last years of the 19th century, Montmartre, a poor Paris neighborhood high on a hill, burst into a frenzy of popular song and dance, creative art and decadent high jinks -- a frenzy with wonderful imagery that still lingers in our minds. We owe most of those images to the works of the diminutive and doomed artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Toulouse-Lautrec was a painter and lithographer of extraordinary appeal.
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