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July 13, 1988 | from Times Wires Services
Canadian Steve Bauer retained the overall lead of the Tour de France bicycle race Tuesday as Jean-Paul van Poppel of the Netherlands won the 10th stage from Belfort to Besancon. Bauer held onto the yellow jersey, worn by the overall leader, with a 14-second margin over France's Jerome Simon. Most of the riders finished in a pack Tuesday with little effect on the overall standings. Bauer placed 57th and, like the rest in the pack, was credited with the same time as Van Poppel.
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SPORTS
July 20, 2010 | Reuters
Andy Schleck vowed to exact revenge on Alberto Contador after finishing behind the defending champion following a mechanical problem in Monday's 15th stage of the Tour de France. The Saxo Bank rider started the day with the race leader's yellow jersey, but his chain jumped off shortly after he launched an attack near the end of the 12-mile ascent to the Port de Bales. He was passed by Contador, who eventually gained 39 seconds after riding flat out with fellow Spaniard Samuel Sanchez and Russian Denis Menchov to take the yellow jersey by eight seconds.
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NEWS
July 24, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
In one of the most dramatic finishes in the history of the Tour de France bicycle race, American Greg LeMond defeated heavily favored Frenchman Laurent Fignon in a gritty, heart-stopping sprint through the streets of Paris on Sunday. With a huge lead going into the final day of the 23-day, 2,030-mile race that is a national passion, Fignon was France's Bicentennial hope on a steamy afternoon.
SPORTS
July 9, 2010 | Diane Pucin
A day after smashing his bike to the ground in a fit of frustration after losing yet another Tour de France sprint stage, Mark Cavendish found redemption Thursday at the end of the 116.5-mile Stage 5 from Epernay to Montargis. The 24-year-old Cavendish, whose Columbia-HTC teammates led him out perfectly through the tricky finish — where the road narrows and roundabouts suddenly appear — won in 4 hours, 30.50 minutes. Another American team, Garmin-Transitions, was also at the front of the sprint pack, trying to sneak out an emotional victory for Tyler Farrar, who is riding with a broken bone in his wrist.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When doctors told Lance Armstrong three years ago that his 5-foot-11 frame was riddled with cancer, with 15 tumors as large as marbles and golf balls in his lungs alone, he was terrified. But he was also determined not to give up. "I've always been a fighter, always," Armstrong said Friday night in a small hotel in this hot-springs town of south-central France. "Always something of a scrapper."
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the last rider struggled up the steep grade to the finish line, the disappointment of the large crowd and, indeed, France itself, seemed to roll up the mountain with him. "He has lost the yellow jersey! Ronan Pensec has lost the yellow jersey!" a cacophony of broadcasters announced from loudspeakers and hundreds of hand-held radios that lined the route. Pensec, his weathered face pale as snow, dropped to the ground and slumped against the base of the winner's platform.
SPORTS
July 25, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Already beset by injuries and illness, Greg LeMond was further distressed last year because he feared his team, PDM of the Netherlands, would try to improve his lagging performances by tricking him into using a banned drug, the American cyclist's attorney said Monday. Although LeMond's break with PDM, the sport's dominant team, was primarily the result of a financial dispute, Ron Stanko of Reading, Pa.
SPORTS
July 17, 2001 | From Associated Press
Lance Armstrong arrived at the foot of the Alps, where he began to take command in winning the Tour de France the last two years. The Texan finished in 32nd place Monday in the ninth stage, 24 seconds behind winner Sergei Ivanov of Russia. Armstrong is 23rd in the overall standings, 35 minutes 19 seconds off the lead held by Stuart O'Grady of Australia. But his strength--the steep mountain climbs--awaits. Armstrong still holds a 27-second lead over his main challenger, Jan Ullrich of Germany.
SPORTS
July 15, 2001 | From Associated Press
A man plowed his car into a crowd at the finish line of Saturday's stage of the Tour de France, injuring four, one seriously, race officials said. The driver was denied entry at an area for accredited personnel when he tried to greet French star Laurent Jalabert after his victory, officials said. Then the man returned to his car, drove at high speed and smashed through several barriers into a group of people, said Patrice Clerc, president of the company that owns the Tour de France.
SPORTS
July 8, 1999 | From Associated Press
In the town where Joan of Arc plotted her attack on the English at Orleans, Mario Cipollini of Italy won the fastest stage in the history of the Tour de France on Wednesday. Coming off a stone bridge spanning the Loire River, the Italian surged past Germany's Erik Zabel in a photo finish to win the 121-mile fourth stage of cycling's showcase race. A favorable tailwind, cool weather, a relatively straight course and wide, flat roads all contributed to the record average speed of 31.
SPORTS
July 21, 2009 | Associated Press
The tension with Lance Armstrong is all but gone in the crisp mountain air, and the line of authority is clear. Now, Alberto Contador wants to concentrate on those teams intent on seizing his Tour de France lead. The Spaniard used Monday's rest day to lay out his plan of attack to keep the yellow jersey he won by capturing the first stage in the Alps a day earlier.
SPORTS
July 28, 2008 | From the Associated Press
PARIS -- Spain's Carlos Sastre won the Tour de France on Sunday, with cycling's showpiece event again unable to escape the shadow of doping. Minutes after the victory, it was announced a rider from Kazakhstan used a banned stimulant. Dmitriy Fofonov tested positive for a "very heavy dose" of heptaminol after Thursday's 18th stage, said Pierre Bordry, the head of France's anti-doping agency. Fofonov was immediately fired by his Credit Agricole team.
SPORTS
July 27, 2008 | From the Associated Press
SAINT-AMAND-MONTROND, France -- Carlos Sastre handled his latest test, and is one step from the Tour de France title. The 33-year-old Spaniard all but locked up victory by holding off Cadel Evans of Australia and other contenders in a decisive time trial in Stage 20 on Saturday, a day before cycling's showcase event ends in Paris. Worn down by an onslaught from Sastre's powerful CSC team during the three-week race, Evans couldn't muster the leg power he needed to erase a 1-minute 34-second deficit, and was caught off guard by the Spaniard's skill.
SPORTS
July 26, 2008
Friday's stage: A 102.8-mile mostly flat stage from Roanne to Montlucon that favored sprinters. Winner: French rider Sylvain Chavanel took the stage in a sprint finish with countryman Jeremy Roy, who was second. Both completed the distance in 3 hours 37 minutes 9 seconds. Germany's Gerald Ciolek was 1:13 behind in third place. Yellow jersey: Spanish rider Carlos Sastre kept the overall lead, topping Team CSC teammate Frank Schleck of Luxembourg by 1:24.
NEWS
July 26, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and JENNY E. HELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Less than three years after vanquishing cancer, U.S. cyclist Lance Armstrong beat the world's best at his grueling craft Sunday, rolling over the sun-warmed cobblestones of this capital to capture the 1999 Tour de France with the fastest overall speed in history. "I never expected to be here. I never expected to win," said the 27-year-old Texan, who finished more than seven minutes ahead of his closest competitor. "I'm in shock," Armstrong said--three times.
SPORTS
May 26, 2007 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Danish hero Bjarne Riis on Friday became the first Tour de France champion to admit that he used performance-enhancing drugs to win cycling's most prestigious race, a development that prompted mixed reactions from the sport's insiders. The confession was lamented by some as the latest significant punch in a series of hits to the sport's credibility, but greeted by others as evidence of healing and hope. Riis' comments -- "I have taken doping.
SPORTS
July 22, 2008 | From the Associated Press
CUNEO, Italy -- New Tour de France leader Frank Schleck and his CSC team were given a surprise doping test after the 15th stage ended in Italy. No results were announced in a race in which three riders have been ousted for drugs. As many as six riders were tested at CSC's hotel, the Italian Olympic Committee said Monday. Labs usually require several days to analyze doping tests. Fifteen more surprise tests were carried out on unnamed teams Monday.
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