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Tourism Australia

TRAVEL
March 26, 2006
AIRPORTS were open and some tours resumed last week after Australia's most powerful cyclone in decades wrecked hundreds of homes and businesses Monday in mainly rural areas on the eastern coast. Some resorts and roads remained closed in Queensland state after Cyclone Larry, a Category 5 storm, struck the Innisfail area south of Cairns especially hard.
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TRAVEL
September 24, 2000 | ARTHUR FROMMER
After years of occupying a fairly secondary position in the world of tourism, Australia finally steps to center stage as a result of the Olympics. The media coverage is sure to add "Oz" to every insatiable traveler's wish list. If Australia is in your plans, there are some basic mistakes to avoid. First, don't assume you can drive everywhere you want to go.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1989 | From Reuters
Australia's tourist industry, starved of domestic airline services for the past week, is facing ruin because of widespread cancellations by nervous overseas visitors, operators said today. Resorts and hotels reported a slump in occupancy rates since the weekend when travelers realized that the dispute, which has grounded all domestic airlines since Thursday, was set to continue for some time.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1989 | From Reuters
Australia's tourist industry, starved of domestic airline services for the past week, is facing ruin because of widespread cancellations by nervous overseas visitors, operators said Wednesday. Resorts and hotels reported a slump in occupancy rates since the weekend, when travelers realized that the dispute, which has grounded all domestic airlines since last Thursday, was set to continue for some time.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2010
NBC to challenge 'Idol' NBC is banking on some reality show royalty to create a new singing competition to challenge Fox's "American Idol. " The network said Monday that it will debut "The Voice of America" in the spring. Its format is based on a popular show in Holland where celebrities are paired with amateur singers in competition. The twist is that the celebrities must pick their teams based solely on hearing their voices without seeing what the contestants look like. "Survivor" producer Mark Burnett and "Big Brother" producer John De Mol will work together on the series.
TRAVEL
January 17, 1988 | MICHELE GRIMM and TOM GRIMM, The Grimms of Laguna Beach are authors of "Away for the Weekend," a travel guide to Southern California.
Our faces were as red as the rock we were climbing, but pesky black flies kept us from opening our mouths to gulp extra air. On the pretense of enjoying the view, we sat down to catch our breath. We still gripped the thick metal chain that was our lifeline for an ascent that seemed straight up. Looking down the slippery mountainside, we recalled what a park ranger had said when we asked whether it was easy to climb Ayers Rock. "There have been 18 deaths we know about," he said.
TRAVEL
June 3, 1990 | JENNIFER MERIN
At first glance, you wonder why anyone other than kangaroos would live in this isolated outback town. The answer: opals. Coober Pedy is one of the world's opal capitals. Australia produces about 95% of the world's supply of the fiery gemstone, and much of it comes from Coober Pedy. On the town's outskirts, the parched terrain of opal fields is pockmarked by probably 100,000 mine shafts sunk into sand and rock, and dotted by piles of rubble that have sprouted around the mines.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When Bruce Schroffel paid $185 to check into the Biltmore hotel in downtown Los Angeles last year, he didn't really expect to be checking out with its $500,000 advertising business. Schroffel, after all, knew that his tiny ad agency, Schroffel & Associates, was going head-to-head for the account with several of the largest ad agencies in Los Angeles.
TRAVEL
August 13, 1989 | MARTI GERDES, Gerdes is a free-lance writer living in Portland, Ore
Except for the first 10 minutes of the 2 1/2-hour flight from Broken Hill, New South Wales, the route to this tiny town had been over barren desert. As we descended, the outlines of a horse racing oval emerged dimly from the terrain of red sand dunes and scrub. A closer look showed dust tufts kicked up by running horses--and about 2,000 people standing around watching. We buzzed the town in about a second.
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