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Tourism Australia

NEWS
April 11, 1995 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of 75 Taiwanese tourists obediently standing in line and wearing orange identification discs on their lapels gasped with simultaneous pleasure as a huge rainbow trout gracefully rose to the food being powdered onto the crystal-clear water below. "New Zealand is so clean, so beautiful," said Judy Chen, a banker from Taipei. "In Taiwan we have so much pollution. Here the air is clear. People are not crowded. It is so different from our home. I love it here."
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TRAVEL
September 12, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
Before the gunfire rang out, the harbor lay pretty as a picture on a Sunday afternoon, boat sails snapping in the wind, ferries chugging under the tall harbor bridge and looping around the great white opera house. A few children lingered at the Double Bay wharf, scanning the watery horizon. Then bang bang bang. The staccato sound carried far and fast across the water.
MAGAZINE
September 19, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, Formerly The Times' Manila Bureau chief, Bob Drogin now reports from Johannesburg, South Africa. His last article for this magazine was on the 1992 Philippines elections.
It is almost dusk. Soon purple and gold will swirl across the tropical sky, and the ocean will change. Sunset means feeding time and a changing of the marine guard. Sharks and other pelagic predators step up the hunt. Moray eels with needle-sharp teeth slither out of coral crevasses. Lobsters and crabs scuttle from their holes. Even some plankton-eating corals, dull brown by day, blossom into brilliant yellow starbursts at night. I wanted to see it.
MAGAZINE
October 13, 1996 | DEIRDRE BAIR, Deirdre Bair has written biographies of Samuel Beckett, Simone de Beauvoir and Anais Nin. She is currently writing about the life of C.G Jung
I've been going to australia almost every year for the past 15, but I didn't discover Adelaide until 1994, when I was invited to speak at Writers' Week, part of the biennial Adelaide Festival. Since then my visits to Australia have taken on a new pattern. As soon as I finish with business, I head for Adelaide for a bonza (good) time. Once there, I dine, shop and immerse myself in Australian art, culture and history.
TRAVEL
August 12, 2001 | BETTY L. BABOUJON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arriving in the Whitsundays on a Monday seemed like the right thing to do. After all, that's what Capt. James Cook apparently did when he discovered the islands in 1770. Cook thought he had arrived on the seventh Sunday after Easter--called Whitsunday, or Pentecost--so he named these 70 or so islands between the Australian mainland and the Great Barrier Reef the Whitsunday Group.
TRAVEL
October 24, 1999 | MARGO PFEIFF, Margo Pfeiff is a writer and photographer based in Montreal
I have to put the Norfolk Island telephone directory aside because I'm laughing so hard. For the past half hour I have been curled up on my cottage sofa with a cup of tea, perusing the pages of Buffetts, Coopers, Christians and Quintals of Norfolk Island. There are so many members of a handful of families here that their nicknames are included in the directory listing: Buffett, Allen (Puddles, Esq.); Christian, Les (Lettuce Leaf); Cooper, R. (Smudgie); banker Bernie (Slow Bern) Fraser.
TRAVEL
September 24, 2000 | MICHAEL D. MOSETTIG, Michael D. Mosettig is a writer in Washington, D.C
There's only one thing that could get a city slicker like me--one whose idea of a perfect vacation is sitting in a cafe--to sleep on the ground in some rural wilds. That one thing is a horse. I've been riding and loving it since age 6, spending summers as a kid on a New Mexico ranch. I never imagined that I could repeat the thrill of 20 years ago, when I raced across the Egyptian desert on a magnificent Arabian horse with the Pyramids as my backdrop.
TRAVEL
February 28, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
Away in the outback, north of Nurrari Lakes and south of the Tanami Desert, lies a big red stone that some people call Uluru and others call Ayers Rock. Occasionally you catch a kangaroo waiting in its shade. At dusk the dingos sing, and tourist-bearing camels plod through the bush, single file. And each day, facing this marvel shortly after dawn, hundreds of travelers find their inner Edmund Hillarys yearning to be freed.
TRAVEL
November 30, 2008 | Catharine Hamm, Hugo Martin, Jane Engle and Mary Forgione
Andaz's wrap artist The much-anticipated Andaz West Hollywood hotel, once known as the Riot Hyatt for the bad-boy pranks of its rock-star guests, was expected to have hung a 190-by-86-foot piece of art over the facade of the 14-story, 257-room hotel (see photo) by late last week. The vinyl wrap by Brian Cairns asks the question, "What is your Andaz?" (The quick answer: a new hotel flavor from Hyatt.) The WeHo Andaz, expected to open just after the first of the year, will be the first one in the U.S. Two more are expected in New York and one in Austin, Texas.
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