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Tourism California

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BUSINESS
April 29, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE and CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The travel slump brought on by the recession and the Gulf War shows signs of easing in California, just in time for the all-important summer travel season. Lured by discounts on hotel rooms, air fares and attractions, consumers are booking vacations at near-normal levels, travel industry executives say, giving a much-needed boost to the state's $48.5-billion tourism industry.
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BUSINESS
October 31, 2008 | David Pierson, Pierson is a Times staff writer.
Jong Min Kang's South Korean relatives are exactly the kind of travelers American hospitality and retail businesses are yearning for during this time of financial despair -- free-spending foreigners on vacation. Members of his large family -- there are 70 cousins altogether -- have vacationed in Australia, Cambodia and China. But they've never come to the United States because they dreaded the long lines, interminable waits and nosy interviews required to get a visa.
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NEWS
September 4, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
A blistering midday sun shimmered eerily in all directions across the vast emptiness here at one of the hottest places on Earth. Despite the 120-degree heat, people poured from rented cars and chartered buses at Badwater--282 feet below sea level, the lowest place in the Western Hemisphere. Steady streams of men and women walked up and down the short steep trail from the parking lot to Zabriskie Point for a dramatic overview of Death Valley's spectacular mountains and weird desert formations.
TRAVEL
November 4, 2001 | EILEEN HANSEN, Eileen Hansen is a freelance writer in Marin County
There was a time when I rode a bike every day. Granted, it had a purple-flowered banana seat, and I was riding the pancake-flat streets of Omaha, Neb. But isn't biking one of those once-learned, never-forgotten skills? So when my husband proposed a weekend of biking on Mt. Tamalpais, a 2,572-foot peak in Marin County and a mecca for mountain bikers and hikers, I blithely agreed. "You know," I said, "I used to balance one-legged like a ballerina on the seat of my Schwinn."
BUSINESS
April 24, 1998
As California's third-largest employer, the state's tourism industry raked in about $61.2 billion in 1997. About one out of six dollars in travel spending nationwide landed in California, where visitors spent about a quarter of their travel budget on retail shopping. Despite this, only 13.5% of the state's 673,000 tourism jobs were in retail sales.
TRAVEL
June 11, 2000 | VICKI TORRES, Vicki Torres is a former Times staff writer who runs a Web-site content company
One evening months ago, my housemate and I were in the den surfing the TV when we clicked on skydivers leaping from planes. "Would you ever do that?" Diana asked me. "Sure," I responded, without a thought. That's why on a beautiful spring afternoon, I redeemed a gift certificate from Diana and found myself dressed in a jumpsuit, harnessed to an instructor and kneeling at the bay door of a plane at 12,500 feet, ready to jump out for 55 seconds of free fall over Lake Elsinore.
NEWS
November 5, 1988 | CHERI RAE WOLPERT
Drivers regularly zip right through the Interstate 15 corridor between Barstow and the state line, giving little thought to what pleasures might be found just off the highway. They may stop for fuel or fast food, but usually they just enjoy the 65 m.p.h. speed limit, ignoring exit signs for Zzyzx, Calico and Yermo. Those road signs are probably overshadowed anyway by the glitzy Las Vegas billboards advertising hotels, casinos and coming celebrity appearances.
TRAVEL
December 6, 1998 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
Here's one way to start a ski season on a merry note. On the same early November weekend that Mammoth Mountain resort opened its doors for winter, a sudden storm dumped about 18 inches of new snow. And so, while workers raced to complete $25 million in resort renovations and additions, three lifts lurched into service and a few hundred skiers and boarders, myself included, got to play in a little powder.
NEWS
August 13, 2001 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Travel and tourism in California are showing surprising strength this summer, proving to be a reliable economic engine that is helping to keep the cooling economy from stalling. Despite worries that this would be the stay-home summer of the decade, state officials now expect vacation travel this season to increase slightly from last year's brisk pace.
NEWS
May 26, 1999 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Restaurant smoking bans have not hurt tourism in California and other states or cities that adopted tough restrictions, according to a new study disputing a key tobacco industry argument against such laws. The report by two UC San Francisco researchers, to be published today in The Journal of the American Medical Assn., found that hotel revenue in about half the states and cities actually jumped after strict smoking laws were enacted.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2001 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Business and labor leaders Friday urged Gov. Gray Davis to consider a wide-ranging array of tactics to spur the state's slumping economy by boosting tourism, home building and other sluggish industries. The proposals were raised at the governor's first "economic summit," featuring a powerhouse roster of business executives that included co-hosts Michael Eisner, chairman of Walt Disney Co., and San Francisco real estate magnate Walter Shorenstein.
NEWS
October 7, 2001 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and EVELYN IRITANI and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California's strong recovery from its economic plummet in the early 1990s survived the Asian flu financial crisis, the dot-com collapse and even this year's rolling blackouts. But now the state's eight-year business expansion finally appears to have met its match. Amid the economic havoc created by the terrorist attacks, business forecasters increasingly are saying that California is joining the rest of the nation in sinking into a recession or near-recession.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Among the unseen casualties of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks are California cities, which are bracing for cuts in services because sales and hotel bed-tax revenues are declining as shopping and travel spending craters. And beyond short-term worries over tourism, there is the specter of further trouble because the state of California's budget is going into deficit--and that will spell cutbacks for all cities and counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2001 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Gray Davis announced Saturday that he has earmarked $5 million for an ad campaign urging Californians to don their tourist hats and take a vacation in the Golden State. "If you take a trip and invest money in our economy, it is literally an act of modern-day patriotism," Davis said while standing on Fisherman's Wharf, where tourism is markedly down. Since the Sept.
TRAVEL
September 30, 2001 | LORA L. CROMMETT, Lora L. Crommett is a freelance writer in Banning, Calif
My husband and I wandered through the apple orchard, taking turns carrying a bushel basket and steadying the ladder for each other as we followed instructions on how to pick the ripe fruit: Push up and lift off so the branch isn't damaged. Our basket of apples tipped the scale at 23 pounds, a sizable haul and, at 85 cents a pound, a bargain too.
TRAVEL
August 26, 2001 | SHARON BOORSTIN, Sharon Boorstin is a freelance writer based in Beverly Hills
Napa and Sonoma have been the toast of wine aficionados for years, but one of the oldest wine regions in California lies to the southeast, in Livermore Valley. Vineyards here have deep roots too, producing award-winning vintages as early as 1889, when Cresta Blanca won a gold medal at the Paris International Exposition. A century later, despite creeping suburbanization, Livermore wine country is thriving, offering tours and tastings at more than a dozen places.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
It is one of the most scenic highways in the world, a winding ribbon of asphalt wedged between the mountains and the sea. The stretch of California 1 at Big Sur cuts through dramatic landscape that has been celebrated by generations of writers. Poet Robinson Jeffers called the area "the greatest meeting of land and water in the world." Longtime Big Sur resident Henry Miller wrote, "This is the face of the Earth as the Creator intended it to look."
NEWS
February 23, 1990 | JOEL SAPPELL and CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The search for the last of seven people who drowned in this frozen Sierra lake was suspended Thursday to allow divers to rest and organizers to bring in more equipment. But as the recovery efforts quieted, a debate began over what, if anything, officials can do to guard against future tragedies. Recovery efforts were curtailed after the Truckee, Nev.
TRAVEL
August 19, 2001 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having learned a little something about traveling with two children, ages 3 and 1, my husband and I keep our vacation expectations realistic. In place of relaxation, Richard and I seek survival. And so we planned a simple summer weekend in Ventura: charming Main Street, cool old pier, historic mission and lots of lovely beach.
NEWS
August 13, 2001 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Travel and tourism in California are showing surprising strength this summer, proving to be a reliable economic engine that is helping to keep the cooling economy from stalling. Despite worries that this would be the stay-home summer of the decade, state officials now expect vacation travel this season to increase slightly from last year's brisk pace.
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