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Tourism Canada

NEWS
January 13, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Never mind all those collapsing trade barriers, the hoopla over the North American Free Trade Agreement and the race for global commerce. Seattle and other U.S. port cities are fast aground on the barnacles of a 19th-Century protectionist statute, unable to rise to one of the tantalizing economic booms of the age: the explosion of cruise ship tourism. This year, hundreds of thousands of Americans will arrive at Seattle's Sea-Tac airport, bound for an Alaska cruise.
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BUSINESS
August 13, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Evidence of how Asia's sickly yen, won and other currencies have infected Canada abounds in this postcard-perfect setting in the northern Rockies. The tour buses that once delivered visitors by the hundreds from Tokyo and Seoul, fueling a boom that transformed this village into a resort with visions of rivaling Aspen, are fewer and fewer.
TRAVEL
May 17, 1998 | VANI RANGACHAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Rangachar is news and graphics editor for the Travel section
My daughter and I are sitting in a sidewalk cafe on Robson Street, nursing cups of cappuccino and eating croissants on a sunny, crisp spring morning. I am watching Meera, verging on 16, cast an appreciative glance at an "incredibly fine Canadian man" walking past our table. We are here because of a whim and a Web deal, an air fare so good that I feel I'm saving money even as I spend it: $99 round trip per person, plus taxes, from LAX on Alaska Airlines.
NEWS
August 31, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bezal Jesudason keeps his table set for 15, here on remote Cornwallis Island high in the Canadian Arctic archipelago. He never knows who may be dropping in for dinner. There were the New Agers from Winnipeg, on their way by sledge to the magnetic North Pole, where they hoped to beget a super-baby. There was the Japanese film crew making a movie called "Antarctica"; because they were at the wrong end of the globe, they had to use stuffed penguins as props.
TRAVEL
September 12, 1999 | COLETTE O'BRIEN, Colette O'Brien is a freelance writer in Mill Valley, Calif
The old steamboat appeared on the horizon, smoke rising from its single red stack to dust the sky. It would take away another batch of families and the leftovers from their summer as "cottagers" here on the Muskoka lakes. From across the water a lone loon called. An answer followed. It was early morning on the lake. The water was flat, a perfect mirror for the blue sky and the trees' fall colors that flashed across the surface like dancing flames, yellow, orange, crimson.
TRAVEL
May 21, 2000 | BETSY BATES FREED, Betsy Bates Freed is a writer living in Santa Barbara
Dusky rays of sun slipped through the stone corridors of 17th century Vieux (Old) Montreal as our carriage driver welcomed us in a lilting French accent. Speaking over the hollow clop of horseshoes on cobblestones, he asked what brought a family of four from California to this island city where the St. Lawrence and Ottawa rivers meet.
TRAVEL
July 23, 2000 | SHARON WATSON, Sharon Watson is a freelance writer in the Washington, D.C., area who specializes in theater and dining
This quiet and beautifully preserved 19th century village on Lake Ontario would be worth a visit just for its atmosphere: very Canadian-British in sensibilities, American in history and language. But it's also a destination for theater lovers, with its May-through-November Shaw Festival. Theater sets this Niagara apart from tourist magnet Niagara Falls, 20 miles down the road.
TRAVEL
May 6, 2001 | LINDA WARREN
Yoho means "awe inspiring" in Cree. As we drove our rented SUV over the 4,000-foot elevations in Yoho National Park, I hoped the name was accurate and that Yoho would translate for us into "less crowded than Banff National Park." A week before, as we drove west into Banff on the 90-minute trip from Calgary International Airport, our family had talked about our wish lists for our first visit to the Canadian Rockies.
TRAVEL
December 7, 1997 | JAMES T. YENCKEL, WASHINGTON POST
To really serious skiers, what I'm going to say is heresy. But the newly revamped French Canadian village that is emerging at the base of the venerable Tremblant ski resort in Quebec Province is so irresistibly charming, it very well could tempt you away from the slopes.
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