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Tourism Hawaii

TRAVEL
March 12, 2000 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
In mountaineering terms, the volcano that created the eastern half of Maui about a million years ago is no Matterhorn. At 10,023 feet, Haleakala is topped by a bone-dry crater instead of an icy pinnacle, and it's easy to reach--by car, no less--from island beach resorts. More than 1.5 million day-trippers annually drive 22 miles up switchbacking Crater Road (Route 378) from the hamlet of Kula to the national park visitors center on Haleakala's rim.
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TRAVEL
March 1, 1998 | JERRY HULSE
It is dawn and save for the sound of ocean waves washing beneath my window, my world is as silent as a shining star. Last evening it rained so that today the sky is as blue as a young girl's eyes. All would be well if only that infernal rooster outside my door would stop crowing at midnight. The bird awakens me with a shrill crow that fizzles to a sputtering stop. It seems exhausted. I think it spent too much time in the henhouse.
TRAVEL
March 1, 1998 | SHIRLEY ASANO, Asano is a Palos Verdes freelance writer
After three sun-washed days on the Big Island, to make up for our self-indulgence, we abandoned our Kohala coast resort when the clouds rolled in and headed south for church in Honaunau. Not for just any church, but for St. Benedict's Painted Church: a charming turn-of-the-century wood structure frosted with murals of Biblical scenes and images. St. Benedict's is the oldest and most renowned of Hawaii's three surviving painted churches--all decorated by Roman Catholic missionaries.
TRAVEL
July 18, 1999 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, Susan Essoyan lives in Honolulu and reports regularly for The Times
When Raymond Kanehailua was a kid growing up in rural North Kohala on the Big Island of Hawaii, he and his buddies would slip off into the mountains and go "fluming." That meant sneaking onto Kohala Sugar Co. land and inner-tubing down man-made channels--or flumes--built to carry water from the wet interior of the Kohala Mountains to sugar cane fields on the dry plains.
NEWS
May 16, 2000 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most governments see tourism as a clean industry, a benign economic engine that produces a huge infusion of cash with little negative effect. In Hawaii, that conventional wisdom now is under attack. The state this year is doubling the money it spends to lure visitors, to a whopping $55 million, as the islands emerge from a long economic slump. But if the Sierra Club has its way, the ambitious marketing campaign could come to an abrupt halt.
TRAVEL
March 11, 2001 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I received my mission shortly after landing on this luscious, 553-square-mile island, a 30-minute puddle-jump west of Honolulu. It was contained in a tourist booklet I picked up at the airport in Lihue, Kauai's main town. The booklet was full of discount coupons for everything from luaus to motorcycle rentals. Particularly well represented were deals on helicopter tours.
TRAVEL
February 4, 2001 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
It spends all its time in Hawaii and is as American as apple pie. At its re-christening last December, it was renamed the Patriot, and Maggie Inouye, wife of Hawaii Sen. Daniel Inouye, broke a bottle of champagne against its side. That's the way cruise ships are welcomed--or re-welcomed--into the world. And in Hawaii, where cruising waned around 1960 as air travel became more prevalent, the Patriot arrived as a bundle of joy, promising to bring jobs and tourist dollars.
TRAVEL
March 7, 1999 | WANDA A. ADAMS, Wanda A. Adams was born in Hawaii; she is a writer and editor in Honolulu
Paul Theroux, as he so often does, said it best. "We're here," he said. "We don't have to go anywhere." "Here" is Hawaii--specifically, his hideaway home on a ridge above Pupukea on the North Shore of Oahu.
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