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Tourism Hawaii

BUSINESS
November 1, 1994 | Jack Searles
If tourism is any indicator, Ventura County is staging a modest economic comeback, while Southern California and the nation as a whole are doing considerably better than that. Travel executives at the county's hotels and resorts report revenue gains of 5% to 10% over 1993. Encouraging as that may be for innkeepers, it pales in comparison to what's happening at Westlake Village-based Pleasant Travel Service.
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BUSINESS
August 2, 1994 | Jack Searles
The recession is but a fading memory as far as Westlake Village-based Pleasant Travel Service is concerned. Thus far this year, sales of the firm's Pleasant Hawaiian Holidays tour packages have increased at least 40% over the same period last year, spokesman Ken Phillips reports. "Our business has improved dramatically in all parts of the country, but the most significant turnaround of all has been in Southern California, which is our No. 1 market," he said.
NEWS
March 28, 1994 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Passengers clad in short-sleeve shirts, shorts and thongs pressed their faces to the portholes of the submarine as it glided 100 feet beneath the surface. What they saw was a reef swarming with marine species. Moray eels skimmed over the deck of a sunken ship and peered from cubbyholes stern to prow.
NEWS
August 3, 1993 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not far off the coast of Waikiki, where thousands would splash in the surf the next day, a series of meat hooks baited with freshly killed tuna dangled beneath the night sea. Hawaii had reluctantly embarked on another shark hunt, hoping to catch nothing and put an end to persistent claims--mostly from surfers--that tiger sharks had become a menace off the heavily populated south shore of Oahu.
SPORTS
July 21, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The archer, stalking his quarry, creeps around a rock, draws his bow, takes aim, releases and scores a perfect shot on . . . a fish? It isn't hunting, and it really isn't fishing. It's bowfishing, Hawaiian style. Bowfishing isn't unknown elsewhere. In California, for instance, archers may shoot skates, rays and sharks and many non-game fish, including carp.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1993 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The tread of Hurricane Iniki still shows in the boarded-up buildings, wrecked homes and blue tarps covering many a roof here on Kauai. But houses are being rebuilt, utilities have been restored and about a third of the tourist-oriented condominiums and hotels have reopened. And the landscape that earned Kauai its "Garden Island" designation has made a remarkable comeback since its whipping by Iniki's 160-m.p.h. winds. Sugar cane stands tall, feathery tassels nodding to each other in the breeze.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1992 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the full fury of Hurricane Iniki struck the island of Kauai, the storm's shock waves also swept through the Westlake Village headquarters of Pleasant Hawaiian Holidays. Workers at the largest Hawaiian tour company have been showing up at 6 a.m. to find telephone switchboards already jammed with incoming calls from concerned Kauai-bound travelers, who now have no place to stay on the island. About 3,500 Pleasant Hawaiian customers were to visit Kauai this week.
NEWS
September 15, 1992 | VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Ida Alkire and her family moved last month from their Seattle home to this place they call the Garden Island, she thought little of hurricanes. This was her slice of paradise. Then she met Iniki. For several terrifying hours last Friday, Alkire and her son coiled under a bathroom sink. Her husband and two other children huddled beneath mattresses in a bedroom closet. They were 10 yards apart but could not hear each other shout in the howling wind.
NEWS
September 14, 1992 | SUSAN ESSOYAN and VICTOR MERINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tourists fled the once-plush hotels of this resort town in chartered boats and helicopters Sunday as food and water supplies dwindled on the hurricane-devastated island of Kauai. Because the island remained without electricity or running water two days after Hurricane Iniki hit, those left behind used buckets of water from swimming pools and the ocean to flush their toilets.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Hurricane Iniki swept through the popular resort island of Kauai on Friday night, it leveled buildings, severed communications and may have blown away travel promoters' chances of boosting Hawaii's already sagging tourism industry. Hawaii could lose $250 million of tourism revenue projected for the remainder of the year, Paul Lawler, spokesman for the Honolulu-based Hawaii Visitors Bureau, said Saturday.
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