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Tournament Of Roses Parade

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NEWS
January 2, 1987
The following floats also won prizes at the 98th annual Tournament of Roses Parade: Sweepstakes Trophy, most beautiful float: Carnation Co., "A Garden Full of Wonders." Queen's Trophy, most effective use of roses: City of St. Louis, "Summer Faire in the Valley of the River Clyde." Mayor's Trophy, most originality: Security Pacific National Bank, "Wonders in the Wind." Pioneers' Trophy, best portraying California tradition: City of Santa Ana, "Folklorico."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2013 | Laura J. Nelson and Christine Mai-Duc and Louis Sahagun
Rose Parade spectator Miriam Pazz was snapping photos of a float honoring military dogs when it came to an abrupt halt. A man bounded off the platform in combat boots and fatigues. It was her husband, who she thought was still in Afghanistan. The crowd leaped up in a standing ovation as 4-year-old Eric Pazz II dashed from the sidewalk and into the arms of his father, Army Sgt. 1st Class Eric Pazz, 32. Moments later, the family locked in an embrace seen by hundreds of millions of parade viewers around the world.
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NEWS
January 2, 1986
The following floats also won prizes at the 97th annual Tournament of Roses Parade: Sweepstakes Trophy, most beautiful entry; Singapore Airlines-Singapore Tourist Promotion Board; "Singapore Celebrates the Legend of the Monkey God Festival," featuring the Monkey God and his primate minions against a background of fans. Directors' Trophy, excellence of craftsmanship; City of St. Louis; "Comedie," Clydesdale horses pulling a Renaissance-era wagon with stages where life-sized marionettes danced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2010 | By Christopher Goffard
Even as idyllically warm weather greeted huge crowds in Pasadena on Saturday, it also was busy hastening the demise of what they had come to marvel at: 42 flower-festooned floats. In response to the oft-asked question -- What happens to all these roses when it's over? -- some of the white-suited volunteers gave the standard, reassuring answer: They will be donated to hospitals and other worthy places. But that seemed increasingly unlikely a day after the 121st Rose Parade as temperatures in the mid-70s lingered during the winter afternoon and hundreds of thousands of blooms -- nourished by vials artfully concealed on the floats -- imperceptibly began to wilt.
NEWS
January 1, 1986
Pasadena's annual Tournament of Roses parade, held on Jan. 1, draws more than a million spectators. The two-hour parade begins at 8:20 a.m. along a 5 -1/2 mile route from South Orange Grove Boulevard, east on Colorado Boulevard to Sierra Madre Boulevard, where the public may view the floats after the parade. Some grandstand seating is availabvle by reservtion, but most viewers simply try to reserve a piece of sidewalk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2010 | By Cara Mia DiMassa and Jessica Garrison
The 121st Rose Parade offered up a message befitting the bright, sunny skies as it celebrated heroes of all kinds, from the steely nerved pilot who guided a US Airways plane to a safe landing in the Hudson River to a troop of soulful-eyed pack mules that helped train U.S. Marines to survive in the mountains of Afghanistan. After a tough year that left many wishing for uplifting news and more champions, spectators along the Pasadena parade route said they appreciated the presence Friday of so many role models -- some in the flesh and some made of poppy seeds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2010 | By Cara Mia DiMassa and Nicole Santa Cruz
The annual run-up to this morning's Tournament of Roses parade unfolded Thursday like a finely tuned ritual along Pasadena's Colorado Boulevard and inside cavernous float-decorating venues. Tourists passed the end of 2009 with sleepovers along the five-mile parade route; and cheery, glue-stained volunteers feverishly applied finishing touches to the parade's 41 floats. As the midnight hour approached, the chilly air wasn't dampening spirits in Old Town Pasadena. Cotton-candy sellers traversed Colorado Boulevard carrying pastel-colored wares, while men in dark jackets leaned against boarded-up storefronts, hawking Rose Parade T-shirts and toy horns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2009
The 121st Rose Parade steps off Friday at 8 a.m., led by grand marshal Capt. Chesley B. "Sully" Sullenberger, who famously landed a US Airways jet safely in the Hudson River last January. The theme of this year's parade in Pasadena is "A cut above the rest." General information Call (626) 449-ROSE or (877) 793-9911. Visit tournamentofroses.com or visitpasadena.com or ci.pasadena.ca.us. Some spectator rules Overnight camping along the parade route is permitted on the night before the parade only.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2009 | By Anna Gorman
Last week, Pasadena resident John Kendall donned a Santa suit and delivered toys to needy families. This week, he has a new outfit and a new position -- as a volunteer with the Pasadena Police Department's "Parade Watch" program. Wearing a cap and a bright-yellow jacket bearing the words "Pasadena Police Volunteer," Kendall is traveling the parade route and reaching out to RV and motor home drivers lining the streets around Colorado Boulevard. He and roughly 50 other volunteers are asking the drivers to pay attention to their surroundings and to call police if they see anything suspicious.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2009 | By Corina Knoll
Night has fallen, so they work by streetlamp light. Matt Rodriguez reviews the route with the driver. "Basically, same as last time," he says, pulling on the bill of his cap. "Use your radio." His wife, Katie, untangles an electrical cord, her brow furrowed and eyes focused. Behind them rises an enormous bald eagle, whose 17-foot wingspan serves as a backdrop for two fighter planes frozen in midair. Fashioned from foam, steel and a fanciful imagination, the eagle will land soon on a Pasadena street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2009 | By Ruben Vives
Reg and Maggie Green and daughter Eleanor were hunkered down at a table inside Pasadena's Rosemont Pavilion, staring at a picture of their son and brother, Nicholas Green. It was no ordinary portrait of the 7-year-old, who made international headlines in 1994, when he was shot and killed in a botched highway robbery while vacationing with family in Italy. Seven Italians received his organs, saving or improving their lives. Because it would adorn a float in the Rose Parade, the picture of the smiling little boy was rendered completely in organic materials.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2009 | By MARY McNAMARA, Television Critic
Stories about the impossibly gorgeous floats that fill Pasadena on New Year's Day are as ubiquitous this time of year as holiday gift cards. But a half-hour documentary airing at 3 p.m. Sunday on KTLA is hard to resist. The title says it all: "The Making of the World's Longest Rose Parade Float Featuring Tillman, the World's Fastest Skateboarding Bulldog." If there had been more room on the DVD screener, the producers should have added "Only This Time He Snowboards." Yes, it's true.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2009 | Alicia Lozano
Swathed in a blue and pink shawl, Cloris Leachman waltzed into the Langham Huntington Hotel & Spa in Pasadena earlier this week like a madcap fairy godmother. The Oscar-winning actress is the grand marshal of the 2009 Tournament of Roses Parade this morning. "Never in my most un-lucid moments had I imagined it," she said in between applications of pink lipstick. "I'm a great-grandmother, and I'm shocked they were even aware of me in this regard."
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