Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsToxic Air
IN THE NEWS

Toxic Air

FEATURED ARTICLES
SCIENCE
February 20, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
When UC Davis scientists collected air pollution particles in Fresno and then exposed laboratory mice to them, they found that one of the most toxic sources was the backyard grill. Along with particles from vehicle and wood-burning emissions, particulates from residential cooking had the greatest measurable impacts on mice lung function.   “That was like, wow!,” said Anthony Wexler, the study's coauthor and director of the Air Quality Research Center at UC Davis. “It's not that you're cooking; it's how you're cooking.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Meat is murder, as the singer and animal activist Morrissey reminded us earlier this week. It's also incredibly bad for the environment. Livestock is among the causes of greenhouse gas emissions , which is responsible for global warming. (Watch this incredible video , and if you only have a minute to spare, fast forward to the 9-minute mark.) If that's not bad enough, a new study from the Air Quality Research Center at UC Davis shows that grilling is responsible for toxic air pollution.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1988
South Coast Air Quality Management District officials will address the Burbank City Council on Tuesday about the city's status as a "hot spot" for toxic air contaminants that could cause cancer. The state officials will offer tips on how the city can reduce pollutants, city officials said. The discussion will take place during the council's regular meeting at 7 p.m.
SCIENCE
February 20, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
When UC Davis scientists collected air pollution particles in Fresno and then exposed laboratory mice to them, they found that one of the most toxic sources was the backyard grill. Along with particles from vehicle and wood-burning emissions, particulates from residential cooking had the greatest measurable impacts on mice lung function.   “That was like, wow!,” said Anthony Wexler, the study's coauthor and director of the Air Quality Research Center at UC Davis. “It's not that you're cooking; it's how you're cooking.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite growing national efforts to reduce toxic air pollution, Orange County industries have had little success in weaning themselves from chemicals that emit hazardous fumes or damage the Earth's protective ozone layer. A Times analysis of 1990 toxic emissions reports filed by local manufacturers shows that most have failed to reduce the tons of pollutants they release into the air.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1991 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County manufacturing companies last year legally emitted more than 860,000 pounds of toxic chemicals that may cause cancer or birth defects or damage the Earth's protective ozone layer, a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency report says. For the fourth year in a row, the 3M Co. in Camarillo topped the county's list of 27 companies that emitted toxic pollutants into the air.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Manufacturing firms in Southern California legally put about 50 million pounds of toxic compounds into the air in 1990, 10% less than a year earlier, according to reports filed by the companies. The materials include chemicals that contribute to smog, deplete the Earth's protective ozone layer and are suspected of causing cancer and reproductive harm. In 1990, 110 manufacturers emitted at least 100,000 pounds each. Eighteen discharged more than 500,000 pounds, the company reports to the U. S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1999 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Cancer risks from breathing toxic air pollution are excessive throughout the Southland, but residents of southeastern and central Los Angeles County face the worst threat, according to a report to be released today by the South Coast Air Quality Management District.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | From United Press International
Through talks designed to avert lengthy legal wrangling, industry, environmentalists and government officials have agreed on rules cutting toxic air emissions from factories, the Environmental Protection Agency said Monday. In the first negotiated rule-making under the new Clean Air Act, the EPA said it has agreed with all interested parties on a plan for reducing leakage of 149 toxic pollutants from more than 450 types of industrial facilities, mostly chemical plants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2009 | Amy Littlefield
Two studies released Wednesday have linked toxic air pollution in Southern California to high cancer rates and complications with birth. Exposure to traffic-generated pollution increased the risk of major complications and premature birth, a report published in Environmental Health Perspectives online concluded. By measuring pregnant women's exposure to chemicals emitted by local traffic, the researchers concluded that the risk for preeclampsia, a condition that can lead to maternal and perinatal death, increased by as much as 42% at the highest exposures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2009 | Amy Littlefield
Two studies released Wednesday have linked toxic air pollution in Southern California to high cancer rates and complications with birth. Exposure to traffic-generated pollution increased the risk of major complications and premature birth, a report published in Environmental Health Perspectives online concluded. By measuring pregnant women's exposure to chemicals emitted by local traffic, the researchers concluded that the risk for preeclampsia, a condition that can lead to maternal and perinatal death, increased by as much as 42% at the highest exposures.
OPINION
March 20, 2009
Re "Hybrid vehicle sales go from 60 to 0 at breakneck speed," March 17 Nowhere in The Times' otherwise thorough article is even passing mention given to the environmental benefits of increasing the number of hybrid vehicles on the road. Like many other early adopters, I chose to get my first hybrid almost a decade ago because of the vastly cleaner emissions and lower environmental impact. Somewhere along the way, however, fuel consumption trumped cleaner air as the news peg for hybrids.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2008 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
Cancer risk from Southern California's air pollution has declined 17% over the last seven years but remains dangerously high across the region, particularly near ports and rail yards, along truck-laden freeways and in parts of the Inland Empire, according to a study released by regional air regulators Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2006 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Despite two decades of cleaning up carcinogenic fumes from cars and factories, Californians are breathing some of the most toxic air in the nation, with residents of Los Angeles and Orange counties exposed to a cancer risk about twice the national average. A nationwide, county-by-county snapshot of the cancer threat posed by air pollution provides a troubling portrait of California, revealing that many potent chemicals still pose an excessive risk. New York tops the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2006 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
The California Air Resources Board voted unanimously Thursday to declare secondhand smoke a toxic air contaminant, opening the door to possible additional regulation of cigarette smokers in coming years. Banning smoking in cars with passengers, particularly children, was recommended by the lone speaker at the hearing, Paul Knepprath of the American Lung Assn. He also called for smoking bans in hotels, motels and apartment buildings.
NATIONAL
February 11, 2003 | Gary Polakovic, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration is proposing to relax measures that curb toxic emissions from a variety of industries, including pulp mills, auto factories, petrochemical plants and steel mills. Under a new set of rules drafted by the Environmental Protection Agency, the businesses could opt out of the current requirement to reduce toxic fumes from their plants to the maximum extent possible.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
Meat is murder, as the singer and animal activist Morrissey reminded us earlier this week. It's also incredibly bad for the environment. Livestock is among the causes of greenhouse gas emissions , which is responsible for global warming. (Watch this incredible video , and if you only have a minute to spare, fast forward to the 9-minute mark.) If that's not bad enough, a new study from the Air Quality Research Center at UC Davis shows that grilling is responsible for toxic air pollution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2002 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A report by a Washington, D.C., environmental group says that children in California are at greater risk of contracting cancer from inhaling toxic air pollutants than adults. The study, which was to be released today and focused on five areas of the state, maintains that a 2-week-old baby in the Los Angeles region has already been exposed to more pollution than the federal government deems acceptable over a lifetime.
OPINION
February 17, 2002
Many thanks for "Finally Tackling L.A.'s Worst Air Polluter" (Feb. 10). While it is stunning enough to realize that the ships calling in the harbor produce as much air pollution as 1 million cars, the health risks of diesel pollution are much greater than those of an equal number of cars. Diesel exhaust has been declared a toxic air contaminant and carcinogen by the state of California. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's goal for cancer risk being increased due to toxic air contaminants is one part per 1 million of population.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|